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One hobby lead to another


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Hello to all of you.

I am new to this forum and to bladesmithing.

I'm a 24 year old man from Norway, and is an educated mechanic.

 

As the title said "One hobby lead to another", and here is why.

 

At the very first day of this year I was out swinging my metal detector when I came across a real Viking sword. Which turned out to be parts of the goods of a viking grave. (Archaeologists did the excavation)

And I have to say, that feeling of holding that pice of iron in your hands. Then realizing it is a sword, a weapon of fear that quite possibly have killed men more then a thousand years ago.

And also when holding the sword play with the thought of that the last person that had it in his hand was a Viking.

IMG_2207.JPGIMG_2215.JPGsverd portrett.jpgøks edit_2.jpgøks2.jpgøks og ljå.jpg

 

Then, about 4 months later I discovered another grave! This time from the period before the viking age, Merovingian age. (if that is what it is called in English?)

This time I realized it was a grave before pulling any artefacts out of the ground, The grave contained a sword, spearhead, axe, scythes, arrowheads, and more.

IMG_2495.JPGIMG_2531.JPGIMG_2533.JPGIMG_2547.JPG

 

I also a few days later found a viking age spearhed

IMG_2437.JPGIMG_2438_mindre.jpg

 

 

So now I really want to learn the art of bladesmithing to hopefully be able to replicate my finds.

I do not yet have any tools or furnace, so thet will have to be built and bought first.

 

Thank you for leting me into this forum :)

IMG_2553.JPG

Edited by Bård Gauden
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Thank you for sharing! That is really really REALLY cool.

 

Joining this forum is a great place to start. More firery bearded, viking tool making people than anywhere else on the webs. Search the heck out of this forum. Buy Jim Hrisoulas' The Complete Bladesmith. It has good info.

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Welcome! That is SO cool. Plus I am an archaeologist, so I thank you for sharing your finds with my counterparts in Norge. It really means a lot, truly. That said, I am so jealous of you ( and the archaeologists!) right now!

 

I have only held two Viking swords plus a few axe heads and spear heads, they being rare in my locale for some reason... I have yet to play with Merovingian artifacts.

 

As was said, you have come to the right place. We can teach you how to do much of this work. Thank you for sharing your finds, and I look forward to watching and helping you on this wonderful journey.

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I'm soooo jealous, not only did you get to find these things, but you got to hold them in your hands. I'm also smiling, because I have a sword on the bench that is pretty much a brother to the Merovingian sword in the picture.

 

Thank you for sharing your amazing finds.

 

Geoff

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What an incredible story! I too am seriously jealous of you right now B) I can only imagine what it must be like to even have the possibility of finding things like that, much less happening upon them, and then having it happen multiple times!!Thanks for sharing your finds with us. It's quite a spectacular thing for you to have found these and then to want to pursue recreating them on your own. Welcome to the forum, and I can't wait to hear more as your story develops!

John

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Congratulations ad very welcome!

Fantastic finds- I am very curious to learn more about them.

As I am sure many other on this forum, I will do what I can to help your journey down the blade smithing path to be long and winding.
I could hardly imagine a more inspiring start!

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So, what is the law in Norway regarding finds like this? I am familiar with the British Portable Antiquities Scheme, and here in the US anything on private property is fair game except for graves.

 

In other words, do you get to keep the weapons? ;)

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Velkommen! Good to see some fellow Norwegians here! Oh, and of course like everyone else here: Lucky bastard!

Check finn.no, there are suprisingly many anvils for sale lately, most are well priced too! On recomendations on books, I would recommend Håvard Bergland´s books. They are pricy, but most libraries have them.

 

You´ve started a lovely long road to follow. Which may lead to many a addictions, like scraphoarding, anvil collectiong and... well, generally collecting anything assosiated to the craft :P

 

If you have some time, maybe taking a course at Hjerleid in Dovre is a tought. Its a bit far away, but they have summercourses etc. I´m actually going to study there myself after the summer. =)

 

Oh, and ofcourse. Don´t just tell us that you want to smith, tell everyone! Based on experience people here in Norway are very curious in the craft, and a lot probably have some tools lying around, which they didn´t know are blacksmith-tools.

 

Seems like i got a bit excited and wrote a lot of things down. :P There aren´t that many Norwegians around.

 

PM me if you have questions about where to get things etc. I´ve had a fair bit of experience with making a decent forge with cheaper tools. (example is the forging hammers at Biltema are surprisingly good)

 

And Welcome to the forum!

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So, what is the law in Norway regarding finds like this? I am familiar with the British Portable Antiquities Scheme, and here in the US anything on private property is fair game except for graves.

 

In other words, do you get to keep the weapons? ;)

Afaik. You can´t keep it. Often you have to pay a hefty amount for the excavation if its on your property.

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Thaks for all of the replys :)

 

So, what is the law in Norway regarding finds like this? I am familiar with the British Portable Antiquities Scheme, and here in the US anything on private property is fair game except for graves.

 

In other words, do you get to keep the weapons? ;)

 

No, all objects that dates to before 1537 is to be considered property of the goverment. And all coins that dates to before 1650 have to be handed in as well. :) In some cases the finder will get a finders fee, but that is mostly for gold and silver finds.

 

Afaik. You can´t keep it. Often you have to pay a hefty amount for the excavation if its on your property.

This is just a rumor! If an archaeological object is discovered and the museum want to do a full excavation, the goverment will take the full cost.
If you are going to build your own house on your own land and the archaeologists want to dig before you build starts, the goverment will take the full cost!

 

But if you are going to build a building for business or in some other way use your land to make money off, and an archaeological excavation is needed you will have to take a part of the cost. But I belive the goverment will still take 20-40% of the cost.

The cost of my finds was completely covered by the goverment. My find have costed the goverment probably in the range og 3-400 000 NOK this year (48,456-64,609 USD)

Edited by Bård Gauden
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Thaks for all of the replys :)

 

 

No, all objects that dates to before 1537 is to be considered property of the goverment. And all coins that dates to before 1650 have to be handed in as well. :) In some cases the finder will get a finders fee, but that is mostly for gold and silver finds.

 

This is just a rumor! If an archaeological object is discovered and the museum want to do a full excavation, the goverment will take the full cost.

If you are going to build your own house on your own land and the archaeologists want to dig before you build starts, the goverment will take the full cost!

 

But if you are going to build a building for business or in some other way use your land to make money off, and an archaeological excavation is needed you will have to take a part of the cost. But I belive the goverment will still take 20-40% of the cost.

 

The cost of my finds was completely covered by the goverment. My find have costed the goverment probably in the range og 3-400 000 NOK this year (48,456-64,609 USD)

Achso! Well thats great then =)

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And once again I thank you for supporting archaeology! It would be nice if you could keep some of the swords and things, though. At least you got to find them, which is more than I have the chance to do.

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Not only fantastic finds, but it's so rare that these get properly excavated by archeologists, particularly in recent times using the latest knowledge in how learn as much as we can during the excavation. Therefore any find like that can lead to a lot of new insights. And thanks for sharing it. The single edged sword is particular of interest too. It would be interesting to see if there's any remains of the hilt material trapped in the oxides that can reveal more about the materials used and construction of the hilt.

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What a great way to be inspired to start smithing! I particularly like that beautiful pre-viking age spearhead. Thank you so much for sharing the pictures. I am also new to the world of bladesmithing. And I've learned so much by reading through these forums. And if you pose a question, everyone seems to do their best to help you out. So I think you came to the right place, Bård.

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Wow! Amazing find and story! Welcome! You'll find a lot of assistance and helpfull advice here! And please post any news of your find!

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Wow! Amazing find and story! Welcome! You'll find a lot of assistance and helpfull advice here! And please post any news of your find!

Thank you Miles, I will post more information of the finds when the museum have preserved the objects.

 

I think I will start next week making as many hardie tools as I can. I have access to a large amount of power-tools at my current job in the city of Stavanger, but I am going to quit and move back home to Hardanger next month so I have to work fast :D

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Thank you Miles, I will post more information of the finds when the museum have preserved the objects.

 

I think I will start next week making as many hardie tools as I can. I have access to a large amount of power-tools at my current job in the city of Stavanger, but I am going to quit and move back home to Hardanger next month so I have to work fast :D

If you need an anvil an antique shop in sandnes has an 60kg anvil for 1800kr now. Fairly worn, but still very usable. =)

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If you need an anvil an antique shop in sandnes has an 60kg anvil for 1800kr now. Fairly worn, but still very usable. =)

Cool, I will go check it out next week if it is'nt sold by then.

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Welcome aboard. As someone who was planning on going to school and becoming an archaeologist, after working with the State Archaeologist from New Hampshire for a while before going to college, and who the head of the geology department at my college basically convinced me to NOT be an archaeologist, but to "get a job in a better paying field, and pursue it as a hobby" I am insanely jealous of folks who live in areas where they can use a metal detector and make discoveries, as you have done.

 

As of late I have been living the metal-detectorist life vicariously through some contacts in Estonia and Latvia where their laws are a lot more lax regarding antiquities, and have been building myself a collection of viking era artifacts, mostly viking, some Frankish, Merovingian and Carolingian.

 

I've been studying, through construction details, the period methods of the construction of their blades, axes, spears and the patterns within them. The jewel of my collection right now is a wolfstooth pattern welded spear head almost identical to the famous wolfstooth spear in the National Museum of Finland, Helsinki however mine is in a much more decayed state, exposing at the edges of the spear the wolfstooth clearly as serrations, and giving great insight into the method of their formation, not available in better preserved specimens.

 

Alan, if you're ever in new england, lets hook up and you can play with my collection, get some hands on time with things that are ultra rare this side of the pond =)

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That is a really nice sax blade there...

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