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Pattern Welded Seax


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Hey,

 

I've been working on this thing for a little bit, and got it forged into a blade yesterday. I thought I would do it tutorial style ala Tai.

 

I decided I wanted to make a traditionally pattern welded seax out of one bar of mild steel, in preparation for my upcoming projects from my own self made iron.

 

It started out as a roughly 3' bar of mild steel, cut into 4" lengths. Seven were carburized, and four were left alone, four HC bars for the edge, and the core layered with the remainder.

 

Here is the core billet welded and etched.

billetwelded.jpg

 

Here is the whole thing with the cores drawn, twisted, and squared, and the edge welded, drawn and squared. It is ready to be wired and welded. The whole of the work was done by hand; Garret Mcormack helped out with an 8lb sledge.

billetprewired.jpg

 

Here it is forged and profiled. I took the cross peen to the spine to make the blodida pattern more pronounced in places. I want it to look sort of wild and organic.

forgedprofiled.jpg

Edited by Jesse Frank
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Cool! Migration-era blades rule, and doing the carburization thing makes this one even cooler. Can't wait to see one made from your homebrew smelts!

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Nice project. I'm finally building my Viking Age smelter for similar work. :)

 

Let's see that pattern!

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Thanks Tai!

 

I stuck it in a capped pipe filled with charcoal, sealed the other end with satanite, and cooked it at 1950 for 45 minutes.

 

Here it is fresh from the sen

scrapedwsen.jpg

 

Here it is after rough filing

roughfiled.jpg

Edited by Jesse Frank
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Thanks guys :)

 

I got it heat treated last night, waited 'till dark. I tried it in the drum forge, but i'm low on fuel, so could'nt get enough pressure to get it past 1375. Guess how I did it?

 

 

 

STROKIN' :D

 

 

Here it is with a quick etch, still with a file finish

quicketch.jpg

 

I be strokin'......

 

That's what I be doin'....

Edited by Jesse Frank
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Guest German

Very nice blade. When you carburize something like 1018 how deep can you expect the carburization to go? Is that equivelent to the term case hardening?

Edited by German
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Thanks guys :)

 

Jake, the blade is a little over 11". It started slightly larger, but the pattern was a little wonky near the shoulders where I forged the tang, so I brought it up so it wouldn't show.

Edited by Jesse Frank
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That's a handsome piece. I like the Sami style handle construction.

 

Have you seen archeodok's Viking Knives CD?

 

www.arkeodok.com

 

It's a must-have for Seax-ers.

 

...and I'd love to see the results of the diffusion study. It's one of the things I want to figure out about how some of these blades were made. It seems common that the PW spine is softer material than the high-carbon edge, and that the PW is not always differentiated by carbon content. Many things I've read indicate that the PW areas were often iron differentiated by phosphorus. My curiosity was piqued the day I through-hardened a blade made with a 1095/1018 spince & a 1084 edge. It curved like a katana and the edge hardened fine while the spine failed to harden. I believe the culprit could very likely have been manganese, which 1018/1095 combo lacks & the 1084 has aplenty. I have a hunch some of these blades were pretty metallurgically tricky...

Edited by J.Arthur Loose
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I must borrow a word you use most often Jesse. Awesome! It's a shame I can't seem to get away to witness you at work and lend a striking hand. I have found an area where the country dirt roads are lined in those little magnetic rocks.I wonder what the locals are gonna think when they see us sweeping the road. :lol:

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Thanks!

 

Yea, we need to get ore! I found out that it has titanium in it, too ^_^ Don't know if that'll affect it or not...

 

I had read the same thing about the phosphorus, but I think there are just as many differentiated by carbon content, according to Tylecote..... I like this method since I don't have to do two separate smelts for one blade :)

 

I honestly think that a whole lot of the carbon diffusion myths are just that. Sure, it does move around some, but I don't think it happens as fast as some people seem to believe. Of course, there are a whole slew of variables, but this thing is made from one single bar, and still shows a good pattern. It spent way more time at heat, too since we didn't use any power tooling to draw it with. :rolleyes:

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