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I want to Pattern weld


Justin leonard
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I want to know some good blends for a first time pattern weld im not concerned about having a specific pattern but i just want some know how and someideas on what metals to use on a first try

http://bearclawknives.com/ my mentor and his friends once told me there os no problem that cant be solved with a fine cigar and a pot of coffee

you know some people just need a sympathetic pat.....on the head........with sledge hammer

Seven Points Forge by the Bay

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You can't go wrong with 1084 and 15n20, google New Jersey Steel Baron, you can buy it already cut up into strips for stacking. It's not "junkyard" steel, but to save frustration and gain confidence for a first try, sticking with a known combo is well worth the little bit of money it'll set ya back.

 

 

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Anything 10xx (1095, 1084, 1070, etc.) mixed with 15n20 is a very easy weld and works well under the hammer.

 

Here's a video I did a couple of years ago on the basic process of pattern welding. Hope it helps:

 

Sorry about the sound. It was a test for the Arctic Fire videos and I didn't know that the microphone picked up normal conversational voice even if the ambient noise of the forge required you to yell so others in the shop could hear you.

 

Dave

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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Oh, also, this is before I learned about the wonders of fluxless welding. Do a search on that topic on the forum to see a long-running discussion on how to accomplish this process with no flux (which is a awesome for a number of reasons).

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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I agree with Dave and Zeb, 1084 and 15n20 seem to like each other and show none of the problems some other mixes have. As Dave said, any 10xx steel will work with 15n20, but 1084 has 2 general advantages: the manganese content is high enough that it etches very dark so you get excellent contrast, and the carbon content is close enough to 15n20's that they respond almost exactly the same during heat-treatment... I have had a blade tear itself apart in the quench because two of the steels used had vastly different properties. Also, 15n20 makes an excellent knife all by itself, as does 1084... mix them together and you still get a great blade.

 

If you do not have access to a power hammer or press and will be hand forging, keep your initial billet small... back when I was hand forging them without a power hammer, I'd keep my billets around 1"x 3/4"x 4", this would be enough to get a good hunting-size knife out of after several folds. If I wanted to make a bigger blade, I'd start with 2 or more billets and weld them together after all the folding and drawing was done. I'm not saying this is the only way, but it worked really good for me... there are some guys who can handle hand welding and forging a sword-sized billet, and I am not one of them...:)

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


view some of my work

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ya ive been looking for the whole artic fire series of videos i love the ones ive seen

http://bearclawknives.com/ my mentor and his friends once told me there os no problem that cant be solved with a fine cigar and a pot of coffee

you know some people just need a sympathetic pat.....on the head........with sledge hammer

Seven Points Forge by the Bay

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ya i know im in the process of building a more reliable forge than my ground forge and im trying to convince my wife to let me buy a post anvil

http://bearclawknives.com/ my mentor and his friends once told me there os no problem that cant be solved with a fine cigar and a pot of coffee

you know some people just need a sympathetic pat.....on the head........with sledge hammer

Seven Points Forge by the Bay

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well i figured it is ith so many people doing it

http://bearclawknives.com/ my mentor and his friends once told me there os no problem that cant be solved with a fine cigar and a pot of coffee

you know some people just need a sympathetic pat.....on the head........with sledge hammer

Seven Points Forge by the Bay

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