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Brother Seaxes Collaboration


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Hello everyone,

 

A long time ago Karter Schuster and I made the decision to do a collaboration on two brother seaxes. Inspired as I can be, I started drawing a possible design for the seaxes.

Back then I came up with this:

 

post-33853-0-96375700-1390249885.png

 

Then I wanted to make a little alteration on the handle design and designed a sheath for it (which is upside down, i know... :P).

 

post-35759-0-99974000-1390413800-2.png

 

After this we had put aside this project for quite a long time because we were both busy with other stuff. But recently we picked it up again.

Karter got a massive leafspring that will be the steel for the seaxes, he is still determining what type of steel it actually is.

 

IMG_0620.JPG

 

After some more discussions about the design we decided to alter it quite a bit. We wanted a more broken back look on it so we changed the back of the blade. Then I wanted it to have a little more sophisticated handle decorations, so all in all a complete redesign. I will have to design a new sheath for it as well and I'll post that later. In the handle you can see our initials in runes.

 

Here is the final design:

 

Schermafbeelding 2014-08-21 om 00.20.27.png

 

Karter will be forging the blades from now on, so I will have some time to rest until crafting the handles and sheaths. :P

 

We will keep you informed on every step in the process!

 

Cheers.

Edited by JasperDielemans
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Actually I will be testing it tonight, hopefully its 5160.

If its 1050 like it was stated to possibly be, eh that's workable too :P

How are you testing it?

Edited by Caleb Harris
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I have to say that your first design was good but that I definitely like your new concept even better, the new one has more... personality? It feels like its got more character, that's just my opinion. Good luck with forging the knives and be sure to check for cracks in the leaf spring, they can be bad about having those. Also when you quench the blade (and maybe this is something you don't need to worry about) make sure the oil is warm, I had a bunch of knives that failed one time because the oil was too cold, that was during the winter time though.

 

Look forward to seeing the progress and the end results!

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...

Update: I have had several unsuccessful attempts at getting the blades right, on the best one the tang had a crack going all the way down the side :blink:, and then mostly the unsuccess was because of the curving from forging bevels.

what's a good technique for straightening the blade from bevel forging?

Edited by Karter Schuster
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Update: I have had several unsuccessful attempts at getting the blades right, on the best one the tang had a crack going all the way down the side :blink:, and then mostly the unsuccess was because of the curving from forging bevels.

what's a good technique for straightening the blade from bevel forging?

Hit it with a hammer...:)

 

But seriously, before forging the bevels, put a curve in the billet going in the opposite direction, then as you forge the bevels it will straighten itself. Some correction will be needed to get the precise shape you want, but precurving the bar will help get you very close.

illust.jpg

My generic precurve theory illustration.... The top silhouette shows the bar after forging the point (or in the case of a seax, clipped to a point), the second shows the precurve, then the last shows what it looks like when the bevels are forged in and the tang tapered... as I said, some adjustment will be necessary but the precurve will help get you in the ballpark. The thickness x width of the stock x hight of the bevel will determine how much precurve you need, but there is as yet no scientific formula. The other method is to correct as you go (during each heat, or every other heat), before the curve gets out of control.

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What George said. I prefer the correct as you go on every single heat method myself. I always seem to end up with a bowie rather than a sax if I precurve. But, many people do it with success. Practice helps too.

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Alan, I always make my breaks sharp at the corner (break) og the preform, and then convex the tip to end up with the seax shape. So that way it will flatten out as it's stretched, instead of curving like a bowie. Probably makes no sense to read it. lol

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Alan, I always make my breaks sharp at the corner (break) og the preform, and then convex the tip to end up with the seax shape. So that way it will flatten out as it's stretched, instead of curving like a bowie. Probably makes no sense to read it. lol

 

 

Makes sense because that's what I do. A little precurve and a convex clip, and when you forge the bevels, everything falls into place. Its actually really quick and easy.

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That's how I do broken-backs as well, except for the precurve thing. Maybe... I suspect we're actually doing the same thing, just describing it differently, if that makes sense. ;)

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  • 3 weeks later...

The blades look real nice, It'll be even better when they go through the quench and get a little bit of nose dive.
Make sure and round off the transitions, by the way.

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Looking good, Karter! I have never done, or considered a seax before coming to this site. Now after seeing all the great works, I will have to venture to that end if the pool! Can't wait to see your's completed!

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