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ChrisWolf

Finished product Carbon Content question

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Hello All.

 

I am not sure if this question really belongs here or not. I was wondering (very general) how the end product/finished blade, carbon content is determined. I know the Spark test and also that to really figure it out you would end to send it off for analysis. What i am looking for is the super general answer..... for example is it just a straight average (in the case of using 2 dif steels), or is it more complex then that? I know more goes into it like type of forge, fuel source, scale, ect.

 

 

Think that makes Sense basically just is it an average (due to carbon migration) or more complex (cumulative)?

 

 

Thanks all

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If you're welding two different steels together, take the average by weight, assuming you're getting your layers thin enough and heating long enough for full migration to occur. So, 1050 and 1095, in equal thicknesses at 300 layers should be treated like 1070 or so.

 

This assumes your welds are good, your steel is known, and your atmosphere is generally neutral.

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If you're welding two different steels together, take the average by weight, assuming you're getting your layers thin enough and heating long enough for full migration to occur. So, 1050 and 1095, in equal thicknesses at 300 layers should be treated like 1070 or so.

 

This assumes your welds are good, your steel is known, and your atmosphere is generally neutral.

Thank you. I was planning on using some 1095,1084, and some 15n20 and wanted to make sure when i list the specs i get in the ball park

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As a habit, I wouldn't try to list specs as if you're a steel mill after making damascus, just list the ingredients and the layers. That's about as much work as you owe any customer, though I suppose it would be nice to have an intelligent answer if they ask that next question... I just wouldn't put too much weight behind it up front, unless you're getting samples tested, etc.

 

Most customers will probably be more interested in the Rc than the C%, if my own experience is any guide. And the balance on those three is within 0.05% by weight, which is not worth trying to be too specific about. Heat treat per the most difficult steel in the mix, and temper accordingly. The 1084 (if it's from Aldo) is going to have some grain refiners in there that the others won't, so don't treat it quite like a simple steel... and the nickel in the 15N20 will etch brighter than the other two, which will have little variation I think.

 

Good luck!

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As a habit, I wouldn't try to list specs as if you're a steel mill after making damascus, just list the ingredients and the layers. That's about as much work as you owe any customer, though I suppose it would be nice to have an intelligent answer if they ask that next question... I just wouldn't put too much weight behind it up front, unless you're getting samples tested, etc.

 

Most customers will probably be more interested in the Rc than the C%, if my own experience is any guide. And the balance on those three is within 0.05% by weight, which is not worth trying to be too specific about. Heat treat per the most difficult steel in the mix, and temper accordingly. The 1084 (if it's from Aldo) is going to have some grain refiners in there that the others won't, so don't treat it quite like a simple steel... and the nickel in the 15N20 will etch brighter than the other two, which will have little variation I think.

 

Good luck!

thanks again Chris

I was hoping for 2 layers with la very slight difference and one that is very bright

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That is exactly what you'll get. The 1084 will etch a little darker than the 1095 because of the extra manganese. Be sure to do a deep etch so you can then polish the high spots, which will be the 15n20.

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