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Before you have an MRI scan make sure you have never had any metal fragments in your eye.

 

I recently injured my finger in a work incident. The ultra sound showed torn tendons but the Surgeon wanted me to go for a MRI for a better look at what was going on.

 

Anyhow last year I had a metal filing slip under my goggles while angle grinding (lesson learned on cheap goggles) and lodge in my eye. The eye doc got most of it out and said the rest would work its way out over time.

 

Well they will not do an MRI as the strong magnetic force will heat up and move any metal fragment which they say can do all sorts of damage to the eye.

 

I know the saying an eye for an eye but...an eye for a finger...no thanks ..I can live with a damaged finger...hope there are other options.

Edited by Rob Toneguzzo
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Yes, I did know that, and the thought of what might happen with an MRI is a scarey proposition! However they had me to go to an eye doctor in the same building who examined my eyes since I have had steel in both of my eyes several times in my life. What ever the machine is, it looks similar to a regular eye examination machine but, it some how allows them to look deep into the eyeball itself and make sure no steel is present. Once certified I was good to go they went ahead with the MRI. As I lied on the table I kept expecting to have my eyeballs ripped out at any moment, like some horror movie! I was real glad when they said we are done!

 

There are special precautions they can take. I always remind them that I have metal cages screwed into my spine from the spinal fusion I had years ago. The thought of my spine being ripped out doesn't appeal to me either.

Edited by C Craft
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I just don't like the thought of it at all...I still have good movement in my finger so I think I am happy to let it heal the old fashioned way.

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They told me that besides moving the particle about the magnetic field heats it up to a point a small particle can also melt. Not sure what to believe about it all. All in all And thinking about it now I really think the first thing to get is the best eye protection you can afford above anything else.

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Whenever having an MRI, I inform them that I do metalworking and need to have an xray of my eyes prior to the MRI to make sure that there are no metal fragments in my eyes.

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Whenever having an MRI, I inform them that I do metalworking and need to have an xray of my eyes prior to the MRI to make sure that there are no metal fragments in my eyes.

 

Come to think of it that may be what they done with me was an x-ray that was too many moons ago! I just remember that they did something to be able to do the MRI. I never fail to tell them about my back fusion and that I may have steel in my eyes. The thought of what might happen if the steel is effected is scarey as HE double hockey sticks!

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Not having an MRI isn't necessarily a bad thing. It felt to me like being inside of a metal tube while someone beat on the outside of it with a baseball bat.

I couldn't wait to get out.

 

Besides, the machine isn't made for someone 6"2" & 260 lbs. ;) If I have any say in it, I won't go into one of them again.

 

Gary

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Whenever having an MRI, I inform them that I do metalworking and need to have an xray of my eyes prior to the MRI to make sure that there are no metal fragments in my eyes.

 

I had to do exactly that before they MRI'd my spine a few years ago. Never had metal that I knew of in a tight spot, but wanted to be safe, so they shot the film to make sure. I was clean, thankfully, and had no issues with the scan.

 

But yeah, a serious "wait a darn minute..." moment.

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  • 2 months later...

You can still have a CT scan. Nonmagnetic imagery, not as detailed as an MRI but will still go a long way for repair. Hopenthis finds you well and in one piece!

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..... It felt to me like being inside of a metal tube while someone beat on the outside of it with a baseball bat.

I couldn't wait to get out........

 

Hmmm, that explains the two guys holding baseball bats standing next to the "MRI" machine, and explains why the "MRI" machine looked like culvert pipe. :-)

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  • 6 months later...

I had one MRI on my neck a few years ago and they said to removal all metal, so my wedding ring went in a locker at the radiology office. Later I needed another MRI (shoulders/fell off the roof) and they didn't say anything about removing metal I was like "um should I take this off?" The guy said no need. I got talking with the MRI operator and he said that different frequencies are used to see different types of tissue and fluid in an MRI so two scans for different purposes may have completely different effects on the same metal in (or on) a body. So I kept the ring on. I figured what the hay. Turns out, at one point in the scan the ring started buzzing mildly. It wasn't too bad. It was kind of like that feeling when a woman other than your wife hits on you. The ring goes ding-ding, remember me? At least mine does.

 

After the scan, the MRI tech showed me some cool stuff with the machine too. Even when the machine is not scanning it still has a very powerful magnetic field which can create an eddy-current in non-magnetic metals effectively magnetizing them temporarily. He had an aluminum rail off of the side of a gurney that he made hover in mid air in front of the machine. He had me grab on to it and try to move it and it was like I was trying to push a blunt object through jello. It is not hard to imagine that if there was metal in your eye, even non-magnetic metal that such an eddy current could be generated making that metal exert significant force on the surrounding tissue. If it buzzed like my ring did then I think your eye would likely get trashed in short order. It is also not hard to imagine that it could heat the metal to melting especially with a small piece of metal, similar to an induction forge.

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I had this thread firmly in mind when they were about to turn on the claustrophobic humming chamber, thinking "any second now there will be sparks and screaming"..
The doctor that ordered the MRI was told about all the various ferrous shrapnel my eyes had taken, but he just shrugged and said if it was still there there would be inflammation, so no x-ray necessary.
This time at least I had my arms free so I felt I could pull myself out if I freaked out, but if I ever have to go deeper into that darned tube or for more than 30min I'll be having the sedatives.

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