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Tutorial: Forge welding my way


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I've never forge welded and it makes *me* want to try it. :lol:

 

Thanks for the pictures and the advice, Jesus!

 

Brian

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Nice :)

 

Ok I got my powerhammer, other got their hydraulic presses (will build one too)...

however your billet looks rather large for hand-hammer work...

So I guess you use the fly-wheel press?

does that work for drawing work... I always thought they'd be to slow for that purpose??

 

Just being curious :)

 

 

Daniel (who loves online-shoptours of all kind)

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"however your billet looks rather large for hand-hammer work...

So I guess you use the fly-wheel press?"

 

 

Now i'm inspired to try it! I have yet to learn forge welding and will obviously start with scraps first, but in connection with Dan's comment, what would be the ideal billet size for hand-hammered work?

 

...and how does that flywheel press work? just crank on that flywheel and away it goes?

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"however your billet looks rather large for hand-hammer work...

So I guess you use the fly-wheel press?"

Now i'm inspired to try it! I have yet to learn forge welding and will obviously start with scraps first, but in connection with Dan's comment, what would be the ideal billet size for hand-hammered work?

 

...and how does that flywheel press work? just crank on that flywheel and away it goes?

25760[/snapback]

 

Flywheel is simple... you just move/rotate a handle attached to the large flywheel...

so it is not as fast and not as powerfull... and I doubt it would serve well for drawing...

but I never used a flywheel press of that size (used smaller ones for punching jobs).

 

billet hand size?

ok, sure if you are willing to spend a lot of time and "waste" some gas the limitations are less severe.... however generally if I would have to work by hand only I would stick to something like: WxHxD 1.5" x 1.2" x 2.7"... this is a bit of work, especially for the first drawing out run...

after that you have two options... just fold it over and repeat the process or draw it out some more and cut it into several pieces, regrind, restack and weld again... that way the layercount increases faster. but more drawing work at first...

another thing to consider, especially when working by hand: USE SHEET METAL...

that way you can start with many layer and need only to fold a few times to get a decent ammount of layers... saves a lot of work.

 

however, should you want to make a lot of damascus consider at least a rolling mill (cheap to build)... whilst it is not the most versitale machine it will enable you to make longer, larger billets in "no time" and does not make any noise...

 

daniel

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Nice tutorial Jesus, thanks for sharing. That flywheel looks new, is it something you bought off the shelf and if so where?

 

I have been wanting one of them for a while.

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Daniel,

 

The fly wheel can be used for drawing. I am fortunate to have a friend who is a machinist and he made a set of flattening and drawing dies for me. As you can guess it does takes a long time to draw the billet with this press but once you get into the rhythm of using it, it does a pretty good job.

 

 

Don,

 

I purchased the flywheel from Kayne & Son.

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Your tutorial is the best I've ever seen about forge welding. Congratulations.

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  • 1 year later...

i agree...that billit is pretty fricken big! is it common to start with so many layers when making damascus? i was under the impression that you just started with 2 maybe 3 layers of bar stock and welded, cut, cleaned+fluxed and then repeat...iv never tried damascus but i look forward to once my skills are sufficent

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You can start with as many layers as you want, but starting with more tends to give you more layers faster. I would imagine though it can also make things more difficult as you have more layers to weld up compared to say 2.

 

I bought me some thinner stock for when I get around to making a billet.

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I'm trying my first billet now and I'm running into a couple of issues. I'm pounding it out by hand.

I started with 2 pieces of 1x1/8x6 mild and one piece of 1x1/4x6 1095. Daniel's got it right- start with thinner pieces to get a higher layer count.

Starting with such a low layer count it particularly wasteful. I think I'm down to about 2/3 the original mass. Each heat shaves off a layer of scale and hand forging is taking a lot of heats (even with the 4# and 8# hammers).

 

I just tried another cut-n-fold tonight and the billet didn't stick together on the first couple of tries. I'm using borax flux and waiting until the billet is sweaty and the same color as the interior of the forge (vertical Fogg style). The frist two folds were really good. The last was a little iffy and this one just didn't take. Should I just give it up and start over or can I still save this piece?

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Do you think you'll have a very good carbon content since only 1/3 of the billet is high carbon to begin with? Was curious about that. Seems like it'd have been better to go 2 pieces 1095 and one piece mild, but I guess it just depends on what you're going for.

 

Just curious.

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  • 1 year later...

That's an interesting steel mixture you have there Jesus.

How does it look when it's done?

I use 203-E and 1095.

I stack with the 1095 on the outside like you do.

It comes out like this.

IMG_0130.jpg

Edited by Conan_568
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I was just looking at the date of my original post. That was 3 years ago. Time goes by too fast. I had to look at my records to find a picture of the finished billet. My notes say that I took it to about 1600 layers. This is the pic.

 

DSCN2001.jpg

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I was just looking at the date of my original post. That was 3 years ago. Time goes by too fast. I had to look at my records to find a picture of the finished billet. My notes say that I took it to about 1600 layers. This is the pic.

 

DSCN2001.jpg

 

That's a nice pattern for 1600 layers.

I stop at 448 for big blades and 336 for smaller ones because of compression.

I reach 448 layers in 4 welds including the first because after the first 7 layer stack is welded, I quadruple stack it.

 

I double up on the 1095 on the inside of the stack so that when the outside 1095 bars are stacked together for the next weld they double up as well.

I lose very little material to the fire, and I use a metal cutting bandsaw to get a narrow cut.

I do grind the bars clean before I restack them.

 

Thestart.jpg

damascus2007.jpg

barwelded2007.jpg

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  • 11 months later...

This may be a ignorant question, but I have only ever arc welded. Does welding the billet together (and welding on a handle) ruin the steel in those spots by burning the carbon? If not, could I arc weld a billet together to forge weld that way?

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