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Last Knife for a While

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I made this one a while ago, and I totally forgot to post it. The design is basically an extended version of the knives I made as groomsmen's gifts for a friend's wedding. The steel on this one is again 1075, and the handle is, starting from the layer nearest the blade, cherry, maple, and bloodwood. I'm getting better at making these, although the handle for this one didn't come out quite like I wanted it to. It ended up thinner than I would have liked due to the holes I drilled in the maple being just a little bit lopsided. The customer was very happy with it, though, and I guess that's what really counts. I left some of the scale marks in from heat treatment, and the finish is a high satin.

 

The reason I say this is my last blade for a while is that I am currently in the process of building a new shop. I'm making good progress there, though, so I expect to be back up and running again by December. I poured the anvil pad yesterday, which was an important milestone. Lots of excitement there.

 

I am still looking for a name for this design, so if you have any ideas, I would appreciate the input.

 

Without further ado, though, here are the pictures:

 

WP_20141012_11_19_19_Pro.jpg

 

WP_20141012_11_18_57_Pro.jpg

 

WP_20141012_11_18_04_Pro.jpg

 

WP_20141012_11_17_33_Pro.jpg

 

WP_20141012_11_17_26_Pro.jpg

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I like the nice clean look it has! Very much the Gentleman's Knife.

 

I'm curious as to what you used in between the three types of wood, it looks like it laminated very well.
Good luck on putting your shop together!

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John, these are super simple to put together. The only thing that you really have to worry about clearances on is the front piece, which you slot just like you would any bolster or guard. The only thing I used to hold them together was two-part epoxy. I put a lot on the tang, and then I filled the cavities in the wood as much as I could. I drilled the cavities for the tang quite a bit oversized. The steel was 1/8" stock, and I drilled the cavities with a 3/16" bit, and just used it as a milling bit to clear out the webbing in between. I pushed them down on top of each other, and squeezed the excess epoxy out the sides. After I push it on, I gently tap the base of the handle (I clamp the blade upright in a vise) with a rubber mallet until it stops moving. It's super important to be gentle with the taps, especially when you're using a very straight-grained wood as the front piece.

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That handle is seriously awesome, I love the simplicity of the shape and the way the colors go together!

 

The only thing I would change is to make the blade continue straight as opposed to having a choil! I like it when the lines of the handle and blade blend together :)

 

-Emiliano

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Emiliano, I actually agree with you halfway about the choil on a lines standpoint, although keeping ergonomics and safety in mind, the choil ended up being the choice to go with. I did a couple of experimental models leading up to this final design (although I unfortunately don't have any pictures) and the first one didn't have a choil. The result was that I nearly cut myself while trying to use it, so the second and final versions had a choil. The choil was actually a toss-up for lines in the design, because I like the kind of interruption of the lines a choil gives. It's to me kind of like saying "okay, here's the blade, and here's the handle." I personally liked it both ways.

Thank you very much for the input, it's very helpful. Also, if anyone wanted to borrow the handle construction method, I would be more than flattered. As this forum always has been, it is a place for sharing techniques and learning as much as showing off.

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Completely agreed! I see what you mean about the choil now, that's one of the things that scares me the most about my seaxes. Since all the lines flow its hard to use them if you aren't really paying attention to what you're doing. Good call on erring on the side of safety!

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