Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I was recently blown away by this dirk by Jud Brennan while researching an iron dirk (athame blade) I'm working on. Jud's dirk (which is incredible) has a habaki-like silver fitting. I was wondering if anybody knew more about how this was made in the context of a Scottish dirk. Is it fit to the blade or soldered to the bolster-plate?

 

jay%2Bdirk%2B009_ret.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the original that I'm pretty sure that dirk is based on doesn't have any metal fittings (there would have been a pommel plate/cap, but it is lost), and I've never seen that habaki type thing on an original (though I have done something similar myself a few times). my guess is that that is thin sheet cold forged onto a steel form the same cross section as the blade, with the top of the form having the same curve as the mouth of the haunches, but it could also be fabricated from sheet, or indeed just soft soldered to the blade - as I say, I don't think there's any direct historical precedent, so any way you can see to do it will be equally valid...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the original that I'm pretty sure that dirk is based on doesn't have any metal fittings (there would have been a pommel plate/cap, but it is lost), and I've never seen that habaki type thing on an original (though I have done something similar myself a few times). my guess is that that is thin sheet cold forged onto a steel form the same cross section as the blade, with the top of the form having the same curve as the mouth of the haunches, but it could also be fabricated from sheet, or indeed just soft soldered to the blade - as I say, I don't think there's any direct historical precedent, so any way you can see to do it will be equally valid...

Okay Jake.... I had a feeling that might be the case as I haven't found any other examples. I believe there are some historical bowies with this feature.. but I guess it doesn't really matter in the project I'm working on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are examples in Western cultures of a "blade collar," not to be confused with Habaki, but serving as a visually similar transition between handle and blade. It's a really easy way to hide an imprecise tang slot in the main guard as well, and done right, adds to the overall look of the piece. What it doesn't do, that Habaki does, is serve a structural purpose in both securing handle to blade, and blade to scabbard.

 

At least that's how I understand them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In another thread on the forum, I linked to A Short Essay about Gaucho Knives. The image below is taken from the article along with the caption. So, this is a practical solution to an engineering or aesthetic problem encountered by cutlers in the past and addressed in a similar fashion?

 

criollo03.jpg

Photo 3. Empatilladura. A reinforcement has been soldered to the handle-crossguard assembly to strengthen the union of hilt to blade. Generally present in long-bladed facones and dagas.

 

~Bruce~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It reminds me a bit of the silver piece seen at the base of these knives. Jud might be the best person to ask as to whether it is a historic thing or artistic license.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...