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Dan O'Connor

Tatara Wall Clay Test

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This video may be like watching paint dry-or more precisely-watching
clay dry. However, I am trying different ideas for filming and learning
my video software. The test in fact was important to me. The first
Tatara worked OK but I felt that the
walls were a bit crumbly and coming off in chunks rather than melting
away. I am still not sure how the wall material helps (or hurts) the
slag in a Tamahagane smelt. Anyway, I ended up with the clay composition
I will use on the next one.

 

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It never hurts to experiment to get a handle on things. I like the box bellows, it looks so effortless. I am curious if you added a decent amount of iron oxide to your clay mix if it will slag away in a controllable fashion?

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I see you too enjoy donning the kilt ;)

Tha' Ah do Laddie. 'Tis quite cool in the heat of Texas and tends to add a certain gravitas to the process. Hard to explain it is.

Maybe it is the Mcleans from ma mothers side a speakin' ta me. I dinna ken.

 

All I know is the combination of a kilt, tenegui , kaji-ba and charcoal really comes together for me. :)

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You may be the most focused and dedicated person I know, when it comes to doing things like this. I don't think "good enough" is in your vocabulary, and I tip my hat to your depth of committment in knowing every part of your process, inside and out, all done by your own hand.

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You may be the most focused and dedicated person I know, when it comes to doing things like this. I don't think "good enough" is in your vocabulary, and I tip my hat to your depth of committment in knowing every part of your process, inside and out, all done by your own hand.

Well thank you very much Chris.

 

Sometimes though I despair at ever actually making something. It is funny-CNC machinery taught me the most about understanding and creating a process.

 

Those things are scary as Sh--. Pushing the button and hoping for the best at the very least ends up with a bad part- at the worst somebody dead. I would get in a groove where all the elements would fit into an elegant solution. When I pushed the go button, I was 99.9% sure I knew what was going to happen.

 

Same with what I call the "Pursuit of Nihonto". All the elements need to fit into an elegant solution. Oh, I agree that there is not always cut and dried solutions. That intuition and feel play a big part. But knowledge and experience go a long way in helping create leaps of intuition.

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