Jump to content

My Forging Press, stages of construction


Recommended Posts

So, after checking out a variety of forging presses and seriously considering buying Kevin Potter's 20 ton press, I decided to save myself a ton of money and build my own. Fortunately, I have a good friend who is an engineer and hobbyist machinist, and he offered to help me. Ultimately, the credit for how this project is turning out belongs to him.

 

This press is based on the now common "mini forge press" that lots of members here have made. But we decided to make it a bit more robust in case I decided to upgrade to a larger hydraulic system in the future. For now I'm going to use a 20 ton air/hydraulic bottle jack, like so many others do, but might want to beef it up later with a true hydraulic system and more tonnage.

 

Anyway, I thought I'd post pictures of the various stages. Maybe they'll give someone here some good ideas.

 

We chose to use 3" square tubing of 1/4" thickness. The vertical posts are 30" tall, and the distance between them (the length of the cross bar) is 12". The base here is only 1/4" plate, but we're going to reinforce it with a platform made of another 1/4" plate welded to a bundle of 1" square tubing. We haven't made the platform yet, so it will appear in a subsequent post. Anyway, here are the upright posts and upper cross bar held together with a bar clamp before we started welding.

 

20141108_112218.jpg

 

The next step was to weld the vertical posts to the base, and then weld gussets at the base of each post.

 

20141108_135313.jpg

20141108_135320.jpg

 

After that, the upper cross beam was welded to the vertical posts, and a gusset was welded between the two on each side.

 

20141108_151327.jpg

 

To further strengthen the cross beam, 1/4" plate was welded over the front and back.

 

20141108_160659.jpg

 

The lower cross beam (the movable one; the one that rides on the bottle jack or hydraulic cylinder) is also made of 3" square tube. Since this lower cross beam isn't welded to the frame and doesn't have to have any structural strength, we decided to use bolts to secure the guides. This will make it so that the movable cross beam can be disassembled and removed entirely from the press when necessary. A 1/4" plate will be welded to the top of this cross beam, and the die-attachment system will be welded to the surface of that plate.

 

20141109_143517.jpg

 

So, here is where we are with the press so far. We still have to weld plates and die-attachment apparatus on the working surfaces of the cross beams; we still have to make a base for the bottle jack to sit on; and we still have to make dies. I will post pictures of each of those steps, but I think it's going to be a couple of weeks before we can get together and finish this up.

 

20141109_164037.jpg

Edited by Dan C
Link to post
Share on other sites

my press cant hit more than 17 tons with out upgrading the system and with the reinforced 3/4 plate that i have for the table with matching thickness gussets has taken a bit of a lean to it over time

Brandon Sawisch bladesmith

 

eagles may soar but weasels don't get sucked in to jet engines

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure I understand.

 

Are you saying I should have gone with a thicker base? I am going to make a base for the jack out of a row of 1 inch square pipe with a steel plate over that, as many others here have done. I just haven't installed the base, yet.

Edited by Dan C
Link to post
Share on other sites

thicker steel were ever you can put it also on the sliding guide the less play that has the better your dies will line up now and latter when its had some abuse

Brandon Sawisch bladesmith

 

eagles may soar but weasels don't get sucked in to jet engines

Link to post
Share on other sites

yeald point on steel most commonly used for tube is about 18 ton per square inch using the roughest math putting you at ok for med term use if you go bigger on the tonnage you might be better off starting over rather than watching the supports bend with time and use

 

when i did mine it was with a reinforced i beem that i used the middle of added steel sheet to the web to get to one inch thick with 12 inches of that thickness below and above the top and base on that alone i should be good for up to 30 tons with constant/hard use if my table holds <_< i need to go gusset some thing excuse me :rolleyes:

Brandon Sawisch bladesmith

 

eagles may soar but weasels don't get sucked in to jet engines

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

LOL. Hmmm. I posted a pic, but it isn't showing up. I'll make a video soon.

 

Edit: Still don't know why the picture isn't showing up.

Here it is as an attachment.

 

20141207_145139_s.jpg

20141207_145139.jpg

Edited by Dan C
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...