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Tutorial on forging a weather vane


C Craft

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Not sure it this is the right place to post this since it really has nothing to do with knife making.

 

I am looking for a tutorial about forging a weather vane. I had someone approach me with the idea of making them a weather vane. There is some of it I can see in my head about to how to go about the forging but there are some parts that have me scratching my head a little. I could stick weld some parts and still may have to resort to a combination of stick welding some parts but would like to forge most of it.

 

So as requested I am looking for a tutorial or WIP on building a weather vane. Not really looking to copy someones work but looking for ideas on "how to" on the forging of some parts! Can anyone point me in the right direction for help with this one!

C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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Forty-four views and no one knows any info on weather vanes! :(

 

I think I got pretty much everything in my head except for the web on the direction arms. What I am speaking of it this. whatiswv.gif

 

On some the directional's were formed as balls or similar. However some of them them were much more ornate. Such as in this one! Anatomy.jpg

 

The directional arms need to be made so that they pivot and can be locked again, once set on a building to true N, S, E, & W. Then locked off to keep that moving. The lock I got no problem with but the web itself has me scratching my head. I can see how to do it if I use a combination of stick welding and forging and unless I can figure out a little more here, that may be the direction that I will go. The web on the directional arm of some vanes like this one above are quite complex and so that is why I am having a little trouble on grasping how it was done.

 

I also would love to know more about how the balls were formed, I have a idea they were hammered out into a mold or form of sorts, in halves and then soldered together.

 

The figure on top of a vane cane be one dimensional or three dimensional. Personally especially since this is my first attempt at forging one, I am thinking I will do the figure on this one as one dimensional!

 

Any advice, thoughts or links to a tutorial or WIP or similar would be of great interest to me. Stuff like this has always fascinated me as much as knife making and I figure the forging practice can't hurt at all!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Edited by C Craft

C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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Whenever I think of projects like this I think about iforgeiron. Then I get irked because you have to download the pictures, which you can only do as a member, which I avoid because that is a rabit hole I don't need to go down. This one is more than enough for me.

http://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/33166-how-to-make-a-weathervane/

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My weather vane technique is plasma-cut and mig weld, unless you are being payed to do something different. Historic weather vanes are usually a hodge-podge of sheet metal techniques and don't contain a great deal of forging. You could do something in repousee, copper being easy and durable for that; two halves soldered together for a 3D figure. Or just flat m/s sheet plasma cut out, unless you want to chisel/jigsaw it out in the name of futility tradition.

Edited by Dan P.
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OK I appreciate the feedback guys!

C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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