Jump to content

Seax from Shear Steel


Recommended Posts

Lately, I have been experimenting with carburizing wrought iron to make shear steel. Here is my first successful result.

 

It is a simple seax in san-mai construction. The cutting edge is medium-phosphorous shear steel made from wagon tires and the jacket is high-phosphorous iron from the Wisconsin globe elevators. Brass, copper and stained hardwood for the hilt. The tang is peened over.

 

0P4A2188.jpg

0P4A2190.jpg

0P4A2188-2.jpg
0P4A2190-2.jpg

0P4A2191.jpg

 

OL: 17in/430mm

BL: 9.75in/250mm

BWAH: 1.5in/38mm

 

The photos are poor since I just snapped them in my office.

 

Let me know what you think.

 

Niels

 

Ps: By high-phosphorous, I mean 0.45% and by medium-phosphorous 0.15%.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice good work, Neils, the steel is amazing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The only "cold" work was straightening around the tip. I used a scrolling fork (with sharp corners) and those left some visible impressions on the blade. Straightening is so much easier when you don't have to fight against hardened steel :-)

 

BTW, I had forgot to mention that Jim Austin was visiting and so we used his carburizing mix for this experiment.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very cool Niels.

 

I've been working with actual historical shear steel lately and have been amazed at how hard it gets. The stuff I've made has never been anything like some of this real stuff that I've been using. I was talking with Randal Graham about that and apparently there is a ton of variation geographically.. and a lot of it has to do with the alloys in the wrought iron used for blistering. I've made some very high carbon stuff that barely hardens.. so apparently I need to find a better parent material.

Link to post
Share on other sites

that is really lovely. I always like to see shear steel, or its refined progeny.

cool.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow - it's beautiful. The textures and colorings hang together so well. The star is obviously the blade, but I think you did an excellent job with the brass/copper/stain complimenting but no competing with the blade.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...