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MLenaghan

Getting those creative juices flowing, Kith 2015

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Since like most of you I'm really not a regular at making Puukko's Might be a good idea to have a bit of a brain storming thread! and since this is befor anyone started the knives yet thought it would be a good place if you guys find and really good W.I.P. or a pic of a puukko that really speaks to you!

 

Came across this old school video, got me really excited about this build now :D

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfxDwsSaDLQ&x-yt-ts=1422411861&x-yt-cl=84924572

 

Happy forging!

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This video has always been a go-to for relaxing and getting some Zen. It goes from raw steel stack to sheathed blade, takes about ten minutes of your day, and has the best sound track behind it I think I've ever heard in a forging/crafting video.

 

 

John Neeman's "The Birth of a Tool- Part III, Damascus Knife" I would post the link but it keeps breaking. Darn phones...

 

 

Edited by John Kruse-Kanyuck

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I might be biting off more than I can chew, but I have always been in love with these horse head pommel puukkos:

anders-22_zpsab5b8872.jpg

I would love to make one of these for my first KITH entry. How difficult is it to get into lost wax casting? I am assuming that would be the best way to make the pommel. Also, anyone have an idea of how these things are attached? Threaded onto the tang maybe?

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It is not incredibly difficult, from an artistic perspective. However, you do need an oven for burn out that can get to, at least, 1600F. If you burn out any lowert than that you tend to form pyrolytic carbon. This is a black sooty residue that manages to not burn off very well at higher temperatures. Anything inside the mold, ends up marring the actual casting.

You use the oven to burn melt and burn off the wax, and then to preheat the mold. A vacuum setup is way nicer, but also pricier. Then, you can use an O/A torch to heat a small alumina or mullite crucible to melt your fitting material. Obviously better with an actual furnace, but doable.

I have only really done small scale artistic castings a few times, but my first job out of school was in a super alloy foundry making air/land based turbine parts. It was all shell mold casting (instead of investment casting, although it is called investment casting... long story). We had to deal with some very picky alloys, and in my experience so far, bronze and silver are a cake walk in comparison.

 

There are guys on here who know way more than I do about artistic castings though, but if you need any help feel free to shoot me a PM.

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I think most of those heads are soldered piece-work, thin sheet pressed to shape left and right, then soldered down the middle and finshed hollow.

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The galleries at Brisa are another good resource for ideas.

 

1.jpg6.jpg17.jpg

 

24.jpg32.jpg

 

29.jpg33.jpg

 

45.jpg52.jpg53.jpg

 

 

Clearly, there are a lot of variations available within the theme. These are my people, and while I voted for Bowie, I'm more than happy to dive into my heritage and see what I come up with here.

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There's 2 tree's in my back yard, but the wife will get mad if I skin them :P

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Would someone be so kind as to post the link to the video in the original post? I cannot get it to load here, browser keeps flipping out.

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Copy and paste this into Youtube

"Kauhava puukko "Финка" "

Edited by DanM

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Thompson's Scandinavian Knife Supply (an affiliate of Brisa in Sweden) has birch bark, it is listed under Other Knife Handle Materials. Also, if you will check the last article from the August 2012 post on Nordiska Knivar - it is about the horsehead puukkos and gives some interesting history.

 

Nordiska Knivar Traditional Nordic Knives is a website which features various puukkoseppa in a blog format. Very inspiring!

 

~Bruce~

Edited by B. Norris

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When I think puukko, this guy's

immediately comes to mind......

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Great topic! I've been meaning to make a puukko for quite some time, but never had the chance. Might have to make a handful...

Does anyone know the difference (cultural, geographic, temporal, etc.) between the sheath patterns? Some come straight to a point, others to a flare, and some to a little disk of leather where the seam ends. Is that just preference?

 

John

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Great topic! I've been meaning to make a puukko for quite some time, but never had the chance. Might have to make a handful...

Does anyone know the difference (cultural, geographic, temporal, etc.) between the sheath patterns? Some come straight to a point, others to a flare, and some to a little disk of leather where the seam ends. Is that just preference?

 

John

 

Just a short infliction, finnish knives is really not in my area of expertise. But the Mukka knife usually had the little lip/disc where the seam begins, at the bottom of the sheath, this was a nice touch for reindeer owners who could cut their earmarks into the bottom of the sheath. It is possible that others had similar intentions in mind as well :)

 

//DQ

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Taisto Kuortti has an excellent article on puukkos that could give you some ideas; http://www.taistokuortti.com/artikkeli1.htm

 

The problem is... apparently there is no english version. However, he has pictures of many traditional models by county or "maakunta" (click on the images to enlarge). I can also translate key areas when necessary.

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Thanks gents!

 

Google does a fair job at translating most of the article B)

Edited by John Page

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Copy and paste this into Youtube

"Kauhava puukko "Финка" "

Great video! He makes it seem so effortless. It's always a pleasure to watch a master.

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This is what inspires me.

 

 

attachicon.giffwC2FnT.jpg

 

Lol! That is hilarious.

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now-kith.jpg

 

Sorry. I couldn't resist.

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