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Hey!

 

So, I don't think I ever updated this project on this forum.

 

For those of you who don't know, I was responsible for all major parts of the fabrication of this cannon, the pattern, the mold flask, the cannonballs, the carraige, I had to reverse engineer all of it. Which is 3000lbs, 10ft long, and fires a 24 pounder solid iron shot 2 miles. Then we fired it, 54 times on a ballistic proving range called Bofors Test Center, at a replica of 16th century warship hull made by the museum, which was 10 tons of solid oak. :D

 

Enjoy!

 

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What was the longest range you shot it?

 

This is truly an achievement. I know you are aware of that, but I just had to say it. This is a career-making level of effort and outcome. I am happy for you. Actually, I am also happy that people have enough interest in these crafts that big works are still commissioned, to keep the tradition and skills alive.

 

outstanding.

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Wonderfully impressive! Would love to see more on how you fabricated such an amazing piece. :)

 

Check out the blog! its in reverse numerical though, from top to bottom, so it doesnt read right but you can get the picture!

 

http://www.vasamuseet.se/Creating-the-Cannon

 

So jealous, I want a project like that :) That's a gorgeous cannon!

 

I got really lucky haha.Very much in the right place at the right time.

What was the longest range you shot it?

 

This is truly an achievement. I know you are aware of that, but I just had to say it. This is a career-making level of effort and outcome. I am happy for you. Actually, I am also happy that people have enough interest in these crafts that big works are still commissioned, to keep the tradition and skills alive.

 

outstanding.

 

Well, the target was only ever at about 100m, and we fired about half of the shots at that, and then they also did half the shots down range, and it was all collected on radar, so I'm assuming that they will have an accuracy cone, this one tended to shoot low and right a little bit, and at 100m, they were grouping them in about 2.5ft. Granted open air on land is not the same as looking out a gun port in a rolling ship during battle, but they were at least fairly accurate weapons.

 

Thanks Kevin! I'm glad I had the oppurtunity, it was an incredibly unique experience! I wish I could work at the museum forever!

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  • 2 weeks later...

A very awesome project! A 2.5' grouping at 100m isn't bad at all when you figure each round is 6" in diameter! If that's not minute of angle accurate, it's certainly good enough for government work! :D

 

Hahah yea, also, I can say that any sort of idea that anyone knew what the fuck was going on during a close quarters sea battle seems nonsense, because theres no way anyone could see anything at all, and the inside of the ship had to be as close to hell as you could get. Also, the relative drop in velocity of a cannonball which when fired from this cannon was around 360m/s, which only dropped to between 325-300 after penetrating 80cm of solid oak. Unbelievable power on these guys.

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