Jump to content
Brian Dougherty

Questions about my KITH design

Recommended Posts

I have seen a few references on this site where puukkos have a diamond shapped cross section. However, none of the material that I have seen on the net explains this.

 

The pictures and videos I have seen show a substantial width spine, and certainly not something that comes to en edge. Is there supposed to be a slight taper from the edge of the bevel up to the spine?

 

Thanks...

Edited by Brian Dougherty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps if you shared those references, we could put them into context. I've never seen such a thing asserted, and generally assume that the blade could as easily be ground from flat barstock, profiled, and bevels cut in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you Christopher,
One came up today in the design forum. I almost asked this question there, but didn't want to steer too far from the OP.

 

I understand that puukko have a diamond cross section. How thick should they generally be at the spine?

 

 

This second clip is the first post that I saw that made me question my understanding of puukkos. I have spent a lot of time looking at videos and build pictures, but I haven't been able to confirm it one way or the other:

How about this?

  • A minimum of 3 inches blade length. Small blades will allow more people to participate and make the KITH more lively. If someone wanted to go bigger, that would be fine but, it is not required. Puukko do not get very large, in general. If you want to make a big blade... Do a Leuku instead of Puukko, Heck, make a set with Leuku and Puukko. If you do, I hope I get your entry!
  • Stick tang knife with scandinavian grind, i.e. no secondary bevel to the edge other than a micro-bevel. Blade of a diamond cross section with the ridge 1/3 of the width from the spine. No plunge cuts and ricasso, just diamond cross section all the way to the handle. blade ground with 17 degree bevel (per side, 34 degrees included.) Unless you do a Leuku, in which case use classic shape, thickness, and grind.
  • Traditional, leather sheath, with wood insert, is part of the package. A good challenge to develop some new skills.
  • Incorporate as many found, unexpected, or scrap components as possible.
  • Make something that fits the traditional aesthetic with out the requirement of traditional materials. Maybe you have small pieces of scrap micarta that you plan to use in place of a stacked, birch bark, handle. If you want to use traditional materials that would be fine too.
  • Names to be drawn July 31.

~Bruce~

 

I understand that "Puukko" represents a wide variety, however, I didn't want to leave off something that is fundamental to being a puukko.

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When we are talking about handmade puukkos having a "diamond" cross section it means a shape (roughly) like this:

 

Timantti.jpg

 

I also added the edge angle range that is typical.

 

Then again, even we Finns can't agree on a definition for a puukko, so, I think there is going to be a fair bit of wiggle room for artistic expression ;) I for one would love to see imaginative interpretations of a puukko, instead of strict form.

Edited by J.S.Voutilainen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the cross section sketch. Very helpful!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps if you shared those references, we could put them into context. I've never seen such a thing asserted, and generally assume that the blade could as easily be ground from flat barstock, profiled, and bevels cut in.

Most of the ones I've seen were like this, simply shaped from flat barstock with the bevel forged and/or ground in, but my favorites were the 'squashed pentagon' type cross-section, they remind me a bit of katanas, just on a much smaller scale.

 

Then again, even we Finns can't agree on a definition for a puukko, so, I think there is going to be a fair bit of wiggle room for artistic expression ;) I for one would love to see imaginative interpretations of a puukko, instead of strict form.

Agreed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...