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Tim Scarlatti

Great! ... for about six months

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Hey Y'all,

Made this darlin' over last summer and I figured it was time for a status report. It started life (or ended one life to begin another) as a file at an antique mall. The birch and cherry were salvage wood. The bolster/guard was the head of a railroad spike and I don't quite recall the origin of the butt plate.

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Pre-assembly and some trial sketches for finishing the handle shape.

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Trial assembly

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Carving in the knot

AND THEN CATASROPHE!

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It got left in the sink and I guess the rear piece of cherry I had added wasn't sealed properly (but it really shouldn't have been in there in the first place). This was maddening to say the least. This is probably my favorite to date in terms of craftsmanship and shear usefulness around the kitchen. So the glue popped, and the pin I put in wasn't nearly as deep as I thought it was. Here's another shot.

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The cherry's dried to the point of shrinking back to the original size, but I'm not sure how I should repair this. I'm might try something to go over the birch a slight bit, but I'd really appreciate whatever ideas you all might have. For now, the knife works, but it's just so heartbreaking to see this handle break.

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I would score deep trenches in the faces of the broken bit and then epoxy the hell out of it. The trenches should give it a bit of bite and make the join stronger...

 

JH

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and this is why you should never rely on glue alone. drill two pin holes through the whole pommel piece slanting inward from top and bottom. locate the pommel on the end of the handle with a spot of superglue, and continue the pin holes at least half an inch into the handle. assemble with epoxy or wood glue, and drive the pins into place with light taps of a hammer - the angled pins will lock everything into place mechanically.4 angled pins is even better, as each one is anchored by the other three and cant work loose.

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and this is why you should never rely on glue alone. drill two pin holes through the whole pommel piece slanting inward from top and bottom. locate the pommel on the end of the handle with a spot of superglue, and continue the pin holes at least half an inch into the handle. assemble with epoxy or wood glue, and drive the pins into place with light taps of a hammer - the angled pins will lock everything into place mechanically.4 angled pins is even better, as each one is anchored by the other three and cant work loose.

Awesome response!

Thanks for the insight and technique.

James

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Or, drive a small screw partially into the handle, drill a clearance hole into the cap

for the head of the screw to fit into, and epoxy the whole thing back together. A

pan head sheet metal screw will grip well and the broad head will give the epoxy

a large surface for bonding.

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