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My second blade, a large seax


Einar
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This is my second sharp blade, a large broken back seax. Its all stock removal, no forging. 5 inch angle grinder and files were used to shape and grind the blade. (I really really need to get myself a belt sander)


Blade length is 45 cm (17.7 inches)

Hilt is 20 cm (7.8 inches)


It had a 20 inch blade originally, but I ground the fuller too deep and broke through in one spot, so I had to cut away roughly a 2 inch section of the blade. There was cursing. Lots of it.


6 mm thick at the clip, which is the thickest and broadest part of the blade. Its is a full "V" grind from back to edge with a deep fuller.


Its made from Nablo 5026 spring steel. (About the same as 1060)


The grip is birch, wrapped with 0.6 mm steel thread, twisted in a herringbone pattern.


Mild steel bolster and pommel.


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(I have no idea why the pics show up upside down on the forum. They are the other way round in the direct links in my browser)

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Well done! That has a really nice menacing shape to it. Kudos for all that stock removal, I've done the same and so I know what's involved :blink:

I have always thought that one man of tolerable abilities may work great changes, and accomplish great affairs among mankind, if he first forms a good plan....

- Benjamin Franklin

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Well done! That has a really nice menacing shape to it. Kudos for all that stock removal, I've done the same and so I know what's involved :blink:

Thank you. The shape is heavily influenced by a shorter Seax I purchased from Owen Bush.

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I'm not a seax man myself, but dang, that thing is awesome, especially for what you said...your second? It's real clean looking. Also, don't underestimate the ability of files. A belt sander can get you in trouble sometimes. Well done sir!

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Dang! I'm liking that Kentish Notch. That's some impressive profiling for a stock removal seax, or any seax for that matter. I get tired of seeing "seaxes" that look like a box cutter the size of a man's arm. You did great though, love the shape.

Has anyone told you that you have an awesome name? Because I think Einar is a really cool name.

Edited by Collin Miller

“If you trust in yourself. . . believe in your dreams. . . and follow your star. . . you will still get beaten by the people who have spent their time working hard and learning things, the people who weren't so lazy.” ~ Terry Pratchett

 

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I'm not a seax man myself, but dang, that thing is awesome, especially for what you said...your second? It's real clean looking. Also, don't underestimate the ability of files. A belt sander can get you in trouble sometimes. Well done sir!

Thank you, Austin. The point where I really wished for that belt grinder was actually when I was making the 10 mm thick pommel. Getting that thing to follow the shape of the grip with an angle grinder and files really made me wish I could lay it on a platen and get it nice and straight and true. Its a 10 minute job that took me hours.

 

Nice! The profile does show the Kentish Notch characteristic of seaxes produced in the vicinity of modern Welling, Kent...excellent grinding, sir.

Yes, I thought to myself; "What this needs is a Kentish Notch, and thats what I did. I... uhm notched the hell out of that thing... (Goes off to google Kentish notch) Alan, what is a Kentish notch? And thank you for the kind words, sir. :)

 

Dang! I'm liking that Kentish Notch. That's some impressive profiling for a stock removal seax, or any seax for that matter. I get tired of seeing "seaxes" that look like a box cutter the size of a man's arm. You did great though, love the shape.

 

Has anyone told you that you have an awesome name? Because I think Einar is a really cool name.

Thank you, Collin, I was most happy with that kentish notch. (Googles again, finds reference leading back to this very forum with no explanation) Is it the curved slope of the clip you guys mean? Thats one of the things that made me fall in love with Owens seaxes, I just think its a very elegant look.

 

I'm quite happy with my name, thanks. :) My full name means something like Outstanding Warrior Daddy from Thunder Bay, which sounds a lot cooler in english than in norwegian. Its also 100% inaccurate. I dont even have kids.

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This is the Kentish Notch. Right at the break, where most seaxes just have an angled corner, the Kentish Notch is a little bit of a round curved swoop that transitions to the angle, instead of just a corner.

6424637735_9a3980e857_b.jpg

“If you trust in yourself. . . believe in your dreams. . . and follow your star. . . you will still get beaten by the people who have spent their time working hard and learning things, the people who weren't so lazy.” ~ Terry Pratchett

 

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This is the Kentish Notch. Right at the break, where most seaxes just have an angled corner, the Kentish Notch is a little bit of a round curved swoop that transitions to the angle, instead of just a corner.

 

attachicon.gif6424637735_9a3980e857_b.jpg

Aha, thank you, Collin. So is it called that in historical seaxes, or is it a particular style of Owens that I have copied without permission? (Please dont sue me Owen, I have no intention of selling this)

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Aha, thank you, Collin. So is it called that in historical seaxes, or is it a particular style of Owens that I have copied without permission? (Please dont sue me Owen, I have no intention of selling this)

 

No problem.

It is present in some historical seaxes, and isn't copywrited, or exclusive to Owen's seaxes, plenty of other smiths have done it as well. Owen is great at using it though, I love his seaxes.

“If you trust in yourself. . . believe in your dreams. . . and follow your star. . . you will still get beaten by the people who have spent their time working hard and learning things, the people who weren't so lazy.” ~ Terry Pratchett

 

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Aha, thank you, Collin. So is it called that in historical seaxes, or is it a particular style of Owens that I have copied without permission? (Please dont sue me Owen, I have no intention of selling this)

 

 

As I recall, Owen saw it on a little seax in the Museum of Ireland shortly before he made a large pile of them, and incorporated the notch. It's in a thread called "The Kentish Hoard" that had a few people guessing if he'd actually found an ancient seax hoard. Plus he lives in Kent and nobody had seen that particular feature, thus the term was born.

 

Since that time several other historic examples have come to light, but we still call it the Kentish Notch. Since forum also started the seax rennaissance, we can call things what we like. ;)

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As I recall, Owen saw it on a little seax in the Museum of Ireland shortly before he made a large pile of them, and incorporated the notch. It's in a thread called "The Kentish Hoard" that had a few people guessing if he'd actually found an ancient seax hoard. Plus he lives in Kent and nobody had seen that particular feature, thus the term was born.

 

Since that time several other historic examples have come to light, but we still call it the Kentish Notch. Since forum also started the seax rennaissance, we can call things what we like. ;)

I like it. :) And yeah, its this forum and in particular Owen's seaxes that made me fall in love with these knives. I hope one day to make one on the scale of the huge seax referred to as the "Little Bealings Seax". I've seen Peter Johnsson's version of it on this forum and thats one of the most stunning weapons I've seen.

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Excellent work! The wire wrapped grip goes well with a seax.

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


view some of my work

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I really like the shape of that blade.

 

Richard

 

 

Excellent work! The wire wrapped grip goes well with a seax.

 

 

very nice!!

Thanks guys. :)

 

George, I love wire grips, but boy are they a pain to make. This one has some flaws that need to be adressed.

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