Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
J.Arthur Loose

Finished smelter

Recommended Posts

smelterdone.jpg

 

Here she is all finished & drying... it's 11" x 27" interior. I may add a few more inches to the top...

 

Now for making some Viking pit-charcoal...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool Jon, can't wait to see that baby smoking! What do you have in the way of local ore to use?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's AWESOME!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks good! what design is that? it looks like its basically a chimney with an opening on the side.

csc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yo, I can't wait to fire it up either! I've got a tarp over it and I guess I'm going to have to wait a few weeks for it to dry before I give it a dry-fire to help cure it. I made it with local clay & local horse dung. I test fired some crucibles up to 1800 F in my kiln and it bisqued nicely without cracking. I've got loads of local ore, Guy. Vermont used to have a huge iron industry. There's a great book called 200 Years of Soot & Sweat, with maps to all of Vermont's old charcoal kilns, smelters & ore fields. There's still a bunch just sitting in the woods. I'm probably going to go to an ore field on Lake Champlain, aside from checking the bog in my back yard. The design is based on the shaft furnace common to the Viking Age, it was visually inspired by this one from Shetland.

Edited by J.Arthur Loose

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

right on !

 

this bloom making stuff is really catching on... ... I like the stone work on the structure.... makes the furnace look like it belongs.. :)

 

make sure to get some pics when you fire it up... woo woo

 

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Loooovely! I could just crawl in there and curl up its so pretty. that is gonna be wicked when she's fired up! I can't wait to see what you get out off it. I wanna build one now! possibly not economically viable at the moment. i'll just watch yours and drool. B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just finished another smelt at my shop this weekend. A good learning experience. Wayne Potratz and Mary Johnson of the Univ of MN were here and completed their first time forge welding some of their tamahagane. The bloom from that June workshop last year was absolutely marvelous. I'll get a few pix up soon.

 

That fire looks like it's going to be a good one. The clay kodai in Japan get fired about the time they look like that. They don't seem to care much about cracking and just fill the holes if they develop, even tie rope around them to keep them together. Start a series of small fires and see what happens. It may cure faster and then you can feed everyone's curiosity sooner. Hint.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah yeah yeah, lets go man, get some fire in there....looks cool....

 

:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Loooovely!  I could just crawl in there and curl up its so pretty.  that is gonna be wicked when she's fired up!  I can't wait to see what you get out off it.  I wanna build one now!  possibly not economically viable at the moment.  i'll just watch yours and drool. B)

26937[/snapback]

 

 

Well, Jake, I figure I'm not *that* far away. ;) Perhaps if you're attending Ashokan this year... Tell you what, get to Montreal or Portland and I'll pick you up, put you up and pay for travel to the conference. In the meantime we'll make you some iron.

 

 

Mike & Randall, I sure wish I had some academic backing... I've got a bunch of stuff on inter-library loan searches coming my way, but I'm winging the whole thing on book smarts...

 

I'll fire it up in a week or two to cure it. It's been pretty humid here. The crucibles I test fired were pretty dry when I did so. They're rock hard & reflect heat well. ...But I expect some great night-time fire photos. B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> I'm winging the whole thing on book smarts...

I was at the Age of Iron at Hancock Shaker Village in Western Ma a couple of weeks ago and there were some guys from the NEB group doing a smelt. They were very knowledgeable and successful, and they were mostly from eastern NY. That's not that far from you.

 

This was the first smelter in operation I had seen. The NEB guys were trying to improve their proccess and were measuring and timing the addition of ore and charcoal. Their ore was about the size of pea stone or a little smaller. They had spent considerable time cutting the charcoal to about 3/4" - 1" to make it feed uniformly in the furnace. The smelter was based on a 3 foot piece of 8" or 9" flu liner covered and supported with clay. For air they had a large blower feeding in through a 4" pipe.

 

A very interesting demo they did,

Dave Suitor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lovely work as always JAL. I ran mine again a couple weeks ago with some different yet interesting non-iron results; I'll try to post some pics here soon if I can get a moment to spare. If I have time for a third run before I have to move to FL next month, I think I'll finally be able to get some iron made.

 

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...