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J.S.Voutilainen

Kuras

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New puukko

 

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"Kuras" is archaic Finnish and simply means "a knife".

 

This one has a 95mm long blade (115 CrV3), edge hardened to about 62 (+/-1) Rc hardness. Edge angle 20, no secondary bevel. Cuts really nice. The handle is curly birch with brass bolsters and 100mm long. The sheath is wet formed 2mm tanned leather, with a wooden insert. It secures the knife with a satisfying "click".

 

Any comments appreciated!

 

P.S. sorry about the poor images (bad jpg compression).

Edited by J.S.Voutilainen

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Aptly named, it is the essence of what a knife should be. Simple but perfect. Your level of fit is impressive! :ph34r:

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I second Alan's comment, the fit is beautiful I also really love the lines

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Both the choice of the materials and tecniques,and the level of mastery of their execution,are simply impeccable,AND ideally balanced relative each other to boot.

 

I'm sure that i've never seen a knife even closer to perfection than this,thank you for posting this.

 

A question:Is a knife like this never to have a secondary bevel,and is meant to be sharpened along the entire bevel planes each time?

Or does the user create a secondary of their choice,eventually(or according to usage,et c.)?

 

Thanks in advance,(and apologies if the answer is somehow self-evident...).

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Nicely done, love the textures!

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oh yeah... that is sweet. I really like the work with the brass, too.

that is a great piece, with nothing to hide behind.

 

You left the grinder marks on the cutting bevel, correct? Is this because the knife is due for use?

I really like the texture and fit of that bolster.

 

kc

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I echo what the other have said, this is really amazingly clean and thoughtful work. Awesome fit and finish!

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Thank you all! Very encouraging to receive positive comments like this. And thank you Tim, I tried my best to put some thought into those lines. Thank you forum members for the inspiration and energy!



Alan


Obviously I’m getting better at hiding my mistakes!



Jake


Good questions.



Yes, when sharpening you grind the entire bevel and then polish just the cutting edge. Technically, the polish does create a ”micro bevel”. I use a leather strop with some polishing compound for this.



Puukkos like this are typically meant for cutting relatively soft materials like pine, birch, fish, bread... finger nails, sausages etc. :P . That is why there is often ”no need” for a secondary bevel. Also, a broad single bevel is relatively easy to maintain, because you don’t need any special tools to set the precise edge angle when sharpening/stropping. The flat surface of the bevel acts as a quide.



Many people (at least finns) appreciate raw cutting power and I always explain the limitations that come with this choice of geometry, combined with hardness. Obviously this is a compromise and sometimes, but, according to my experience, rarely, it is necessary to create a more pronounced secondary bevel. Depending on the task.



Hope that makes sense.



Kevin


Correct, this one is most definitely meant to be used. There are some puukko-makers who prefer to polish the blades, and some even say that blades showing these marks are ”incomplete”. I think that is a touch harsh. Personally I don’t mind the grinding marks, as they mask inevitable scratches from use. Furthermore, after one sharpening the blade is not going to look polished. I do, however, try to make the grinding marks as uniform and perpendicular (?) as I possibly can.


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Thanks so much for such detailed explanation.

 

I'm guessing that the (traditional for puukot?) laminate,it's softer jacket steel,fosters such technology as well...

 

Magical knives,these...

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I'm definitely no expert, but I don't think laminate blades are traditional for puukkos.

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what a beautifull piece of work!awesome!

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