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Tang adjustment question


Tim Tracey

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Hi guys, so I've forged myself into a little problem.

So I got the bug to make a puukko, but as I was forging the tang I placed it in the top third of the blade instead of in the middle. Sorry I didn't take a picture, which would have helped.

 

So the question is this: is it possible to move the tang (stick tang) down to the middle from the current position? I'm afraid my first attempt at a puukko has been thwarted.

If it can't be adjusted, any suggestions for a remedy?

 

Thanks,

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You can.
Its a little tricky.
If you heat the piece in the forge or even better with a torch about a half inch on both sides of the tang junction and the blade.
Then put the tang flat on the anvil face and the shoulder of the blade flat on the side of the anvil.
Then do a half face blow so that the hammer strikes half on the shoulder and half over the anvil face which is also over the tang.
It should drive the tang up wards towards the center.
If as you say the tang is on the upper third then unfortunately you will be striking edge up and you will have to flatten out any wrinkles in the blade and then flatten out the tang because you are going to drive material into the tang making it thicker.
So its tricky.

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So if I'm getting this right. You forged to tang off center from the middle of the blade. I have done this as well, but on purpose. So you don't really have to do anything to the tang. What you have to do is offset where you place the slot for your handle so the blade is centered and in line with the handle.

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A drawing of what you have now, and how you want to move the steel would be helpful. I'm afraid I'm confused (not an uncommon condition for me!).

 

Grins,

 

Dave

-----------------------------------------------

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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You can.

Its a little tricky.

If you heat the piece in the forge or even better with a torch about a half inch on both sides of the tang junction and the blade.

Then put the tang flat on the anvil face and the shoulder of the blade flat on the side of the anvil.

Then do a half face blow so that the hammer strikes half on the shoulder and half over the anvil face which is also over the tang.

It should drive the tang up wards towards the center.

If as you say the tang is on the upper third then unfortunately you will be striking edge up and you will have to flatten out any wrinkles in the blade and then flatten out the tang because you are going to drive material into the tang making it thicker.

So its tricky.

 

 

this, use a piece of heavy wood to hit on the edge to lessen the wrinkles.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Exactly. The technical term for the large chunk of wood (I use a baseball bat) is a "schwocker" per Steve Schwartzer. ;)

 

To avoid this problem, set the bevels before you set the tang. A centered tang will always be off-center if you bevel afterwards. Alternatively you can set the tang off-center before forging the bevels and hope it self-centers, but that takes practice to know just how much to do.

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This is why I've taken to forging my tang as a taper from the where the shoulders are going to be and then file them in.
I make this and many other tang mistakes.
It gets a little old.
Alan thanks for the technical term.
Good point on the wood Sam.

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Wow guys thanks for all the suggestions! I tried to attach a photo but my new tablet is smarter than I am.
I tend to call a large stick, a "persuader". I've got several persuaders around to give it a go.

Alan, learned the hard way that the bevels being forged in REALLY move the tang. That's mostly why I'm in this pickle.

Dave, essentially picture a Japanese style blade with the tang at the spine of the blade. But the tang isn't quite at the top. Hope that helps.

 

The only concern I really have is because it's a stick tang the effort to move it will be the same process to re-move it. I think I'll give it a shot with a wooden persuader and if I can't center it, I'll just make a wooden handle to accommodate the goof. ;)

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The easiest way to remedy this is to cut the shoulders of your tang further up the blade, with a disk cutter or hacksaw. Take out two little triangles each side (as if you had "set" them with a butcher), then re-forge the tang out. It is going to look horrible after you cut, but will look fine after you forge out the tang.

 

Trying to remedy this by forging alone, as per jjSimon's suggestion is, in my view, a waste of time. You will still lose length, but you'll also be facing a lot of distortion of the edge, and more importantly the spine.

Edited by Dan P.
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Dan, Owen, evidently I've got some more to learn about puukko's.

 

At long last here is the picture, while Im sure everyone's imagination are great, this may help ;)

 

It sounds like I'm still good for authentic puukko, so good news there!

Unless I'm able to move the tang, the handle will need to be wood instead of the birch bark I planned on.

 

 

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With a tang that narrow there's not much steel left to even things up by grinding. Heat the tang to just above where it joins with the blade and drive the blade down as described above. You are also going to have to square off the heal of the blade but that can be done by grinding though you can turn the blade point up with the rounded heal resting on the anvil and striking on the point to upset the steel. Of course you will have to rework the point a bit after that. Just part of the fun of forging out a blade.

 

Doug

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Gary, very true It turns out that I didn't make make mistake, just wandered from the ideal a tad.

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