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Dan O'Connor

Lost Year and New Doors.

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I am officially calling this my lost year regarding blade smithing but also a celebration. A year ago this month I walked into an emergency room in Houston with a ruptured appendix. I had walked around with it for a couple of days. I was basically a toxic waste site by the time they opened me up. It was a near thing. Obviously I recovered.

 

So, I have gotten a few things accomplished in my forge but I have turned some of my attention to my long neglected other long term project-the building of my house.

 

I am moving my office downstairs and adding some space to the shop.

 

I am not sure anymore if it is a blessing or a curse knowing how to make stuff. I am easily disgusted with price and/or quality of available products. In the end, it is that most precious of commodities-Time- that I am spending. Be that as it may, these are new doors for a new office and shop expansion. Knotty alder bought straight lined but otherwise rough-a 12" wood planer is a beautiful thing.

 

My Little 10" portable Bosch saw is a trooper.

40lb buckets of crushed, and sorted magnetite in the background. Soon my pretties -soon

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Bits and pieces milled out.

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Home made drill jig.

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Oak dowels and heavy screw

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Laying in the planks

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Coming together

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Two down, one to go. Yes, they are upside down.
Note to self-don't hang them that way.

 

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Nice job! Glad you have recovered and are making headway. It is amazing how easy it is to get diverted on the path by many time-consuming things, as i have in the course of trying to get my place built. Carry on!

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Good to see you back, Dan! Nice doors.

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Holy Cow, Dan. I had no idea. Peritonitis is nothing to mess with. I'm glad to hear

you're on the mend. My ex-wifes husband died from peritonitis. He tried to stubborn

his way through and by the time the pain was too great, he was too weak for surgery.

He died 2 days later.

 

Welcome back!

 

Bill

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Those doors make me happy.

 

My dad is a woodworker, and I got my love of making things with my hands from growing up in his shop watching and later helping him make everything from tables, to bookcases, to doors for our house in Cordova, Alaska.

 

I sometime get the urge to work wood, but find that a blade shop--with it's constant black dust, and tools designed for grinding rather than cutting or planing--is not a good place to attempt this. Also, scale is a problem (not forging scale, but size/proportions). Even if you work on swords, we tend to make small bits. In a woodworking shop you deal with feet rather than inches or thousandths of an inch and I find our bladesmithing tools ill suited to the task.

 

When I visit my father's house I sometimes use his shop and envy the nice, clean sawdust and wood shavings, and how you can enjoy the smell of freshly cut cedar rather than try to keep the toxic metal dust you are producing from killing you.

 

Very nice job on these. Thanks for sharing. I look forward to you return to bladesmithing!

 

Dave

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I was curious about what happened to you. I always love your posts, and I miss Texas very much. I had a similar issue, only I was 14. Probably rebounded a lot faster.

 

Glad to see you back.

 

oh yeah, nice woodworking. I never chose to focus much time on woodworking, for the reasons you stated above. Can only learn and do so much.

kc

Edited by Kevin (The Professor)

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Holy Cow, Dan. I had no idea. Peritonitis is nothing to mess with. I'm glad to hear

you're on the mend. My ex-wifes husband died from peritonitis. He tried to stubborn

his way through and by the time the pain was too great, he was too weak for surgery.

He died 2 days later.

 

Welcome back!

 

Bill

LALALALA! I CAN'T HEAR YOU!!!!

 

Yeah. I did the same. The surgeon said he was scooping me out. It never occurred to me though that it would not all work out. Had a really funny nurse and once I was more or less up and running again she said "Ya know, we have never had someone this bad not die on us. We are all pretty proud of ourselves." Mighty damn proud of them myself. :)

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Those doors make me happy.

 

My dad is a woodworker, and I got my love of making things with my hands from growing up in his shop watching and later helping him make everything from tables, to bookcases, to doors for our house in Cordova, Alaska.

 

I sometime get the urge to work wood, but find that a blade shop--with it's constant black dust, and tools designed for grinding rather than cutting or planing--is not a good place to attempt this. Also, scale is a problem (not forging scale, but size/proportions). Even if you work on swords, we tend to make small bits. In a woodworking shop you deal with feet rather than inches or thousandths of an inch and I find our bladesmithing tools ill suited to the task.

 

When I visit my father's house I sometimes use his shop and envy the nice, clean sawdust and wood shavings, and how you can enjoy the smell of freshly cut cedar rather than try to keep the toxic metal dust you are producing from killing you.

 

Very nice job on these. Thanks for sharing. I look forward to you return to bladesmithing!

 

Dave

Thank Dave,

 

Yep -space is a problem. My current covered open air space 16'x24' is our future outdoor kitchen. My wife is tired of the future part. Hence the current construction project(s). :)

 

I started out working wood-making bolt action rifle gunstocks, carpentry apprentice etc.Then about 1974 I picked up a good quality handmade knife and the stage was set. Somehow this led into the machinist trade which got me comfortable with precise tolerances. I go back and forth now. You are right working wood is a nice break from sometimes intractable steel. However I tend to use dial calipers (non-digital) as well as a tape measure. :)

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I was curious about what happened to you. I always love your posts, and I miss Texas very much. I had a similar issue, only I was 14. Probably rebounded a lot faster.

 

Glad to see you back.

 

oh yeah, nice woodworking. I never chose to focus much time on woodworking, for the reasons you stated above. Can only learn and do so much.

kc

Thanks Kevin.

 

Closest I ever came to maiming myself was with a table saw. Luckily just nicked the top of my fingernail. I don't count the time I Zigged when I should have Zagged on a big grinder and threw a 200lb piece of steel over my head and into a wall 20 feet away. There would have been no maiming on that one.

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You are one lucky SOB. With great medical help. Now, dammit pay attention to pain.

It's your body telling you something's wrong. God bless and stay well. Hope to see

you at F&B next year.

 

Bill

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You are one lucky SOB. With great medical help. Now, dammit pay attention to pain.

It's your body telling you something's wrong. God bless and stay well. Hope to see

you at F&B next year.

 

Bill

Yeah Buddy on the great care.

 

Memorial Hermann Northeast in the Houston area was the place to do it. Fabulous people. Not a single bad experience while I was there.

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Stained and waiting to dry.

 

Oh yeah! And actually finish building the openings to hang them. :)

 

 

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