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Brian Dougherty

An Indiana Puukko

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This is my first attempt at a puukko, and I didn’t really know much about them when I started. My research lead me to conclude that a lot of variability is allowed, so I took a few ‘Liberties’ with the style. I hope this holds up to the KITH standards. I haven’t made many knives yet, and learn a lot with each one. (This is #6)

 

Puukko%201%20A_zpsfn9i9ekv.jpg

 

I added a bit of file-work at the base of the spine. I didn’t want to detract from the interesting diamond geometry, but I felt that 1” of textured surface would be an advantage for a utility knife born in a seafaring culture.

 

I also played with the pommel shape a bit to try to create something that would be easier to draw from a tight fitting sheath. I’m not sure this idea was a win. What is that adage about not tinkering with proven knife designs?

 

Puukko%201%20C_zpsxg7pihxg.jpg

 

The blade is made from 5/8” round W1 that has been differentially quenched in brine and tempered at 400F. This was my first time forging W1. I had hoped for more activity with the hamon, but I’ll keep at it.

 

The bolster is the only piece of mokume gane that I have made so far. It was a trial piece I made back in December, and was sitting on the bench staring at me when I was trying to design the handle for this knife.

 

Puukko%201%20B_zpsm1hnqkss.jpg

 

The handle wood is a piece of redwood burl. I figured a North American puukko should have a wood that is as distinctive to the place of origin as the Baltic Birch of its ancestors J

 

The sheath was also a first for me. I have never tried to stitch the leather around a wood core. I guess it turned out OK.

 

I hope the recipient is happy with this knife. I’m sure I’ll look back one day and think it looks rather amateurish Thanks!

 

Puukko%201%20D_zpsyjx3v1mp.jpg

Edited by Brian Dougherty
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Oh yes, that is one sweet puukko!

 

I think the choices you made where you departed from "tradition" are all great. Beautiful blade & lines and spot on material choices. We can add a new maakuntapuukko to the list B). Maakunta = county.

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Thank you gentlemen.

 

J.S. I can think of no higher honor than your approval. I followed your tutorial for the forging. I found it very helpful.

Kiitos.Olen kunnia.

Edited by Brian Dougherty

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Here is a pic of the back side of the sheath. The suspension ring is made from 1/8" brass. I wrapped it around a 3/4" rod to make a ring, and then flattened a section to make it "D" shapped. the ends were soldered together once I attached it to the sheath.

 

Puukko%201%20E_zps0dssm7bd.jpg

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Good job! I've seen many experienced makers who can't - or choose not to, for some reason - do it that well. And this is your first...

 

:ph34r:

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Dude!

 

Pat your self on the back!

This is complete... soup to nuts. A lot of professionals have problems learning how to finish that last 10%.

Grats!

 

-Gabriel

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