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Twist Damascus bowie


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I apologize, humbly, for posting after such a long absence.

I just scheduled myself in one of Ric Furrer's Wootz classes and realized I had not been here in quite some time.

It's not often I get some really nice photography done and hoped you wouldn't mind if I shared one here.

This is a recent Bowie I made for the Blade Show and had Caleb Royer do some of his magic for me.

The blade is a 324 layer single twist of 1095 and 15N20. The Bowie is a take-down with stainless fittings and Desert Ironwood.

I will also show the steel bar as-twisted.

It's pretty tight and i didn't even work up a sweat. (I used my pipe threader twister. B) Made it so easy I felt like I was cheating.

 

CBBW-1_zps1vdok3sv.jpg

 

MTa-1_zpsr5opjsu9.jpg

 

MTb-1_zpsp2aqmjzs.jpg

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Good lord, that is a tight twist! The knife turned out beautifully. I love the pattern and the Desert Ironwood has some awesome figure.

I hope you take to posting more often Karl; I would love to see more.

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Great looking knife!!

Next time, try welding extensions onto the ends of your billet and twist the entire bar, sacrificing none of your pattern welded material to the vise, and/or whatever secures the ends while twisting.
Just from what I see in your vise, this method would've added 30% more twisted material to your net yield.

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Beautiful, but then all your knives are. I love the pics of the twisted billet.

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Wow, that is stunning! Are the fittings 416 stainless?

 

This is a very timely post for me because I am working up my first twist billet now. Looking at your twisted bar, and the final pattern makes me realize how little I really understand about how this pattern develops. It's given me much food for thought, and I'm thankful you posted the pic of the twisted bar.

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WOW, i'm finally getting to see this on a bigger screen than my phone. it is just stunning

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that twist looks great (so is the photography). Hard to believe how young Caleb is.

I like the fittings, especially the butt cap/final thingy.

nice all around.

kc

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JD - you are correct.

That said - I just don't trust my welds. By the time the twisting arrives, we've got so much invested in the billet, I just don't want to risk unwanted problems.

So, I only consider one end wasted. The other end is used for the tang. I should then take the cut off and squish it down end-ways for fittings.

Or, make a bigger billet!!

Great looking knife!!

Next time, try welding extensions onto the ends of your billet and twist the entire bar, sacrificing none of your pattern welded material to the vise, and/or whatever secures the ends while twisting.
Just from what I see in your vise, this method would've added 30% more twisted material to your net yield.

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Yes, there is a chance. Not any time really soon, however.

My old wooden computer - XP - just can't handle my movie editing programs any more. After I get upgraded I'll be able to use my new Go Pro and I promise I will get some action shots.

Beautiful knife Karl, any chance of seeing your pipe threader twister in action?

Cheers Rex

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Kris, it is done at a welding heat.

Great attention is paid during the layering process to do everything possible to ensure all welds are consistent and secure.

Done properly, when it comes time to twist, we are not twisting a bunch of independent layers, but we are twisting ONE! piece of steel with alternating properties.

 

 

 

How do you manage to twist so tight avoiding snapping the bar? That seems impossible to me.

Edited by Karl B. Andersen
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Thanks for answer. Do you use a torch? As I can only heat the bar in a forge, catch with a vise and twist a little bit. By the time the material cools down, then I heat again, and again... :-)

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No sir - no torch used on this one.

I just heated in the forge.

Keep in mind that from the time I pull it from the forge until it is completely twisted in less than one minute.

And it's over an inch in diameter, so it holds its heat for that long with no problem.

 

Thanks for answer. Do you use a torch? As I can only heat the bar in a forge, catch with a vise and twist a little bit. By the time the material cools down, then I heat again, and again... :-)

Edited by Karl B. Andersen
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Hope you get your video editing/production hooked up. I'd love to see a bar like that twist up in under 60 seconds!!

Edited by andrew zimba
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  • 2 weeks later...

Hope you get your video editing/production hooked up. I'd love to see a bar like that twist up in under 60 seconds!!

 

I just did another one nearly like it, but just a little LARGER diameter.

I gave it 14 twists.

My twister runs 28 RPM. So, 30 seconds.

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That's incredibly impressive. Would you mind showing your twisting tool? I know what first popped in my mind probably isn't what you're using so I won't even ask if that's it or not. :)

 

 

It's a Rigid Pipe threader.

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