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It has been a while since I've posted. Mostly because I've had my head down in the trenches mounting this blade as well as quite a bit of travel, my hammer-in and workshops. This blade started out as an octagonal profiled narrow rapier-style spatha based on Illerup Adal finds and is a two bar, low layer twisted core and fish-mouth welded piled 1095 laminate edge. My original ideas for the spatha did not work out aesthetically and I felt I had no choice but to abandon the idea. I then offered the bare blade to my customers as an opportunity. The result was this jian. I saw the potential for the jian and sort of pushed for that option.

 

This jian is a contemporary fusion of elements deriving from some of the famous Warring States bronze swords and the later period iron swords of the Qin dynasty. The guard and pommel are rough sand cast bronze (an alloy that I came up with using copper, tin and lead) that was engraved following casting. The wood is Lake Superior black oak and ebony. Decorative elements are from Warring States swords.

 

The blade is 24" and total weight is 1 pound 3 oz with a POB 3" from the guard. It is light and fast.


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I'm very excited about this sword and am very much looking forward to exploring more themes within Chinese swords.


Edited by Scott A. Roush
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Let me be the first to say well done Scott, as usual you don't disappoint!

the pattern is gorgeous and as far as the mounting is concerned I like the taper on the handle, very nice.

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Now THAT is nifty! :blink:

 

Seems like I remember Antonio Cejunior showing pictures of ancient Chinese pattern-welding on dao. And the earliest evidence for garnet cloisonne comes from what is now the edge of western China... While I realize this is a fantasy piece, it is well grounded in the could-have-been. Well done. B)

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Now THAT is nifty! :blink:

 

Seems like I remember Antonio Cejunior showing pictures of ancient Chinese pattern-welding on dao. And the earliest evidence for garnet cloisonne comes from what is now the edge of western China... While I realize this is a fantasy piece, it is well grounded in the could-have-been. Well done. B)

Thanks Alan. Yes.. the more I learned about the different swords through Chinese history.. it began dawning on me that I was making something that would fit in pretty well with Qin dynasty iron swords.. in terms of the relative sizes and shapes of the guard and pommel.

 

And I never even thought of this potential analog to cloissonne! The engraving you see in my guard would've had jade or some other stone embedded. I chose 'texture' due to present skill level. But now that I'm playing with this.. I'm curious about working with jade.

 

And yes.. I was very pleasantly surprised to see the existence of twisted composite patterns in Chinese swords.

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Wow, that is stunning - both in terms of design and craftsmanship.

 

I hesitate to ask this question because I don't want to pull the conversation away from how remarkable the piece is: Would you be willing to share the layer count and twist rate you used for the core?

 

I've been trying to figure out how these two variables affect the pattern but haven't found a lot of info on using lower layer counts to create big bold patterns like you did. In fact, I just bought some modeling clay I was going to experiment with tonight to see what happens. However, what you achieved is exactly what I am going after.

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Wow, that is stunning - both in terms of design and craftsmanship.

 

I hesitate to ask this question because I don't want to pull the conversation away from how remarkable the piece is: Would you be willing to share the layer count and twist rate you used for the core?

 

I've been trying to figure out how these two variables affect the pattern but haven't found a lot of info on using lower layer counts to create big bold patterns like you did. In fact, I just bought some modeling clay I was going to experiment with tonight to see what happens. However, what you achieved is exactly what I am going after.

Hi Brian... Thanks for the comments. And no.. I don't mind at all. This is fairly low layer count stuff for me. I've tended to go quite a bit higher in my past composite projects... but then I started seeing how nice and simple low layer can look for these twisted patterns. So the core bars are only 7 or 8 layers of 15n20/1084 with two thicker layers of mild steel on the outside of the billet. In general.. I love the potential of high layer pattern welding.. but simple and bold SOMETIMES works. Most of the time not... at least that is how I see it.

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That came out pretty darn awesome. The only aspect that I'm not a fan of is the pommel, but a bit of digging around on Google Images seems to turn up some that are of similar (though not exact) shape.

 

Would really love to have this thing in hand to feel its heft. Great work!

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That came out pretty darn awesome. The only aspect that I'm not a fan of is the pommel, but a bit of digging around on Google Images seems to turn up some that are of similar (though not exact) shape.

 

Would really love to have this thing in hand to feel its heft. Great work!

 

Yes I can see how the pommel isn't for everybody. Even though there are examples of discoid pommels on iron jian.. the intention of this grip was to represent the all-bronze grips on the Warring States bronze jian.. i.e. Sword of Goujian. The ebony risers in the grip and the discoid pommel recall this aspect...

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There are very few people that can go from Viking to Japanese to Chinese and make it work so beautifully. Awesome work, Scott! It's been a real treat seeing this come together and I'm impressed and humbled by the result! The pattern goes beautifully with the engaging on the pommel and guard, beautiful! :D

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This piece came out amazing, the warring states period bronze swords are some of my favorites and you've captured their spirit quite well. Scott, the range and versatility of your skills is very inspiring!

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Scott - well, you already know I love this one. I am glad to see it here, and done.

 

Yes - the Chinese swords give you a rich palette of materials and shapes to work with (is that proper English?). You know what I mean, anyway.

 

Great work. Now, I have to finish these simple knives and get back on my (Chinese) horse.

 

always a pleasure to see your work. This one really resonates with me, as you well know.

rock on, man!

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Holy crap, man. Out of the park on this one. I bet it makes you want to slide the point through something whenever you hold it.

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That really is something else Scott. I saw it earlier on FB on my phone, but big pictures certainly make a difference. I am totally excited to see where you go with Chinese inspired work since your first piece is a complete knockout. I am sure the future owner of this is nothing if not thrilled.

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A shame the original idea didn't pan out, but I to say you saved the project splendidly. Fantastic looking sword.

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