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Hi Murch,

I harden my blades by quenching in a 475 degree low temp salt bath from 1500 degrees Fahrenheit. I then reduce the stress in the hardened blade by triple tempering at between 475 and 500 degrees for three cycles of 1 hour each. By using a low temperature salt pot, I am able to Marquench my blades producing very tough hardenned steel. before quenching I do a triple normalization on long blades to reduce the hardenability a bit and create a fine homoginous grain structure. This process creates really tough springy blades, I do a bunch of test cutting with each blade after heat treating to make sure its sound. the pople trees around hear are always nervous when I'm around...

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i think this is from a museum in Denmark, one of the scandinavian guys on the ancient weapons forum of sworforum posted it a while ago and I saved it. these are bog finds.

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It is thinking about being.

Edited by J.Arthur Loose
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That is a beautiful piece.

I remember when Scott Langton was commissioned to forge a replica of the Sutton Hoo sword.

I had just taught myself to make Damascus steel, but when I saw that sword Scott made I knew I had to try one,, or two.

Here is my first attempt at an interrupted twist sword blade.

They are a lot of work, but worth it.

I have another one with a 22" blade in progress right now.

It will hopefully have a ladder pattern edge when it's done.

This pic is of my first attempt.

IMGA0493.jpg

 

This pic is the cores of my second Sutton Hoo pattern sword.

SuttonHoocore2.jpg

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I am finally able to get back to this piece... billets are bound and ready for welding...

 

The Lankton Sutton Hoo is a real benchmark, and my inspiration in college to pursue Migration pattern welding.

 

Keep at it!

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It will allow itself to be birthed when it is damn good and ready.

 

Some want to be born quick, and some want to be born later.

 

I no longer force the issue.

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It will allow itself to be birthed when it is damn good and ready.

 

Some want to be born quick, and some want to be born later.

 

I no longer force the issue.

 

 

I know exactly where you're coming from.

The bottom Bowie in this pic fought me every step of the way.

Towards the end I noticed a slight kink in the blade tip, so I put it in the oven for an hour, then ran out to my shop the straighten it.

The hot blade found a hole in my oven mitt and the next thing I knew it was diving point first towards my cement shop floor.

It seemed to happen in slow motion too and the tip actually stuck into the concrete before it fell over.

There was no damage, and I did tweak the tip OK, but some blades are sure a struggle.

I actually stopped working on it for a week to get even.

 

Done001.jpg

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I am sure, gentlemen, that when it's done, it will be well-publicized and nobody will have to ask. Until then, pestering tends to diminish enthusiasm for finishing promised work... this is something I've learned after taking a couple too many custom orders.

 

I will be happy to see it when it's ready to be seen.

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School's out in just a couple weeks...

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Finishing? HA ha. Truth is, the customer didn't want that piece. The blade I made in this thread was featured in David Darom's book and went on to sell at Mastersmith's in NYC, for what it's worth.

 

I might revisit the concept this Summer, who knows? Maybe. Maybe not. I teach a damascus class at Peter's Valley in about a week and then have 7 weeks of relatively free time. I have smelting projects to do and a bouzouki to make, some beekeeping, finishing a chicken coop, rebuilding a drywell and cutting some serious firewood. That and planning for my Fall jewelry and metalsmithing classes. I'm getting blacksmithing up and running at the school, so I gotta scrounge some materials and make a forge.

 

There will be some blades for sure this Summer though, as I have to have something to show for Ashokan, right?

~

Now go to bed, Grettir thread!

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Wait. You keep bee's, Yul? That's awesome! We need to talk when I brew my next batch requiring honey. More than happy to pay for it. I just prefer to use as much all natural ingredients as possible...tastes better!

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