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Silver Steel Puukko


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Hey there!

Here's a small puukko I forged for my soon to be wife.

The blade is Bohler k510 silver steel with a satin finish blade, I hand sanded that thing for ages. The handle is curly birch, with a locally harvested (uinta mountains UT) Elk antler and a thick brass bolster. Whatcha' think?

20150716-0S1A3604.jpg

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Dylan, I am digging the knife, She should be pleased as these are the best all-around everyday knives I think. You'll probably end up making one for yourself!

May I ask where you got the Bohler K510?

Thanks,

 

Gary T

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love puukkos, and you made a very nice one here.

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I dont know if outfitting your soon to be wife with a sharp knife is such a good idea :P Oh wait, youll be in the honeymoon stage for a couple of years. Take it away after the tenth year :D for your safety. HAHA just joking, but very nice knife and congradulations. Marriage is grand.

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Where abouts in Utah are you Dylan, I am out in Murray.

 

And that is a very nice puukko, I wish I could get the cross section of them right, I always end up with another blank destined to be a pairing knife when I try to get the diamond cross section...

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Love the puukko's, and your's no exception. Simple Beauty, that curly birch has just the right amount of "action"going on it it. Also a big fan of the forging finish as well.

I bet your soon to be wife will love it for years to come.

 

-Tim

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Hello, not bad at all. Well done.

However, I am pretty sure that my finnish brothers agrees, but I will not put the words in their mouths. But over here, marrow showing on the side of the handle is considered bad form. It might be something to think about for the next one :-)

//DQ

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Where abouts in Utah are you Dylan, I am out in Murray.

 

And that is a very nice puukko, I wish I could get the cross section of them right, I always end up with another blank destined to be a pairing knife when I try to get the diamond cross section...

Im actually in provo! glad to here of some other smiths in the area. The cross section is a pain, I generally forge in a pretty distinct line on the back side to give myself a guide.

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Hello, not bad at all. Well done.

 

However, I am pretty sure that my finnish brothers agrees, but I will not put the words in their mouths. But over here, marrow showing on the side of the handle is considered bad form. It might be something to think about for the next one :-)

 

//DQ

I know! I was actually pretty bummed about it, actually considered smashing off the handle and replacing it, but the lady likes it and it cuts just fine for her :)

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I hope no one minds, I am taking the liberty of expanding a little bit on what Daniel Q said (not in a critical way at all, though. Daniel is a good guy, and has helped me a lot with information and critique).

 

It is not bad form to show marrow, in those cases where it is obvious that showing marrow was your intention. See this from Roger Bergh, that shows marrow from a new bone, and also fossilized marrow (I think).

 

It can be done, with confidence, when the piece of bone or antler (I guess it is not really marrow in an antler) is oriented properly.

 

http://www.rogerbergh.com/index.php?view=detail&id=267&option=com_joomgallery&Itemid=4

 

take care,

kc

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I hope no one minds, I am taking the liberty of expanding a little bit on what Daniel Q said (not in a critical way at all, though. Daniel is a good guy, and has helped me a lot with information and critique).

 

It is not bad form to show marrow, in those cases where it is obvious that showing marrow was your intention. See this from Roger Bergh, that shows marrow from a new bone, and also fossilized marrow (I think).

 

It can be done, with confidence, when the piece of bone or antler (I guess it is not really marrow in an antler) is oriented properly.

 

http://www.rogerbergh.com/index.php?view=detail&id=267&option=com_joomgallery&Itemid=4

 

take care,

kc

 

Hello Kevin! Hope everything is good with you.

 

Thank you for the comment, yes, you have a point and thank you for it! But, I stand by my words, I will however, elaborate them a bit more. Again, my english is not the best and I might come across as.. Cross.. Or grumpy, but I assure you, that is not the case :-)

 

Showing marrow on the sides is considered to be bad form. When you are using for example a piece of reindeer or moose antler that you have situated in the same orientation as the one Mr Wanta made (marrow going direction of front to back) and the marrow starts to show on the sides as you grind it down, you have used a piece to small or with too much marrow on that knife, and thus planned it poorly. Marrow showing on the front or back piece of a antler knife is considered OK because that's the way antlers grow, but a nice detail if none is showing.

 

Showing marrow on for example fossilized walrus (like in the picture of Rogers knife) is quite a different story. Especially since it is so dense in comparison to the marrow in reindeer antlers. Different material, different "rules". :)

 

But I do admit that this is the traditional man in me talking... If someone makes knife with a crosscut piece of antler that has had it's pores filled and makes it look good. All the power to them, but if it doesn't look better than the way it's usually done... And I do realise that good quality antlers are not so easy to come by in all parts of the world, so a lot of knife makers have to adapt to that.

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I know! I was actually pretty bummed about it, actually considered smashing off the handle and replacing it, but the lady likes it and it cuts just fine for her :)

Hehe, I am sure she does, it is a nice knife :). I am rarely and advocate for smashing the handles and starting over. Better fill the poores with superglue, sand off and keep going :).

 

A small tip, when I use antler in my knives, I measure the radius of the marrow in the antler quite carefully, and when sanding, just before the actual marrow starts showing, there's a more whiteish layer, a bit softer than the regular antler but still not as porous as marrow. If I see it, I stop right away, seal it and usually doesn't show on the finished product. (This is on reindeer and moose, haven't used any other antler so can't be sure if it applies to all)

 

//DQ

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Daniel - I didn't at all think you were wrong. Just showing the options. Of course, you are right. Fossilized marrow is quite different.

thanks for all of the detailed information.

kc

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  • 1 month later...

Nice knife, Dylan!

 

I've found elk to be pithy stuff even with the largest antlers. You can get big marrow-free crowns but still the amount of material is small relative to other species, and even the 'marrow-free' sections are shadowy. Best to turn to reindeer or moose if you want to avoid marrow and want a purer color. However I think that there is a special appeal to a knife made with a locally harvested animal. I collect Washington state elk antler, and especially Olympic elk (sub-species) whenever I can and use it in my knives whenever I can.

Edited by Phil Ullrich
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