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Austin_Lyles

My life in Bastrop,TX (not knife related)

43 posts in this topic

 

Me too. My first major in college was physics, with the intention of becoming an astrophysicist. It never happened though because I was a stupid teenager. I still regret it to this day.

 

Me too! I was even the astronomy lab TA for a while. Then Differential Equations (second-year calculus, second semester) conquered my feeble brain and I remembered that archaeology doesn't involve math beyond geometry... I don't regret it, but I do miss the telescopes.

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Me too! I was even the astronomy lab TA for a while. Then Differential Equations (second-year calculus, second semester) conquered my feeble brain and I remembered that archaeology doesn't involve math beyond geometry... I don't regret it, but I do miss the telescopes.

Yeah, Diff E-Q (as we called it) killed many a science major.......

So, I switched to Theater! No math at all! And lots of flexible female dance majors in tight fitting clothes...

But I stray off topic. Excellent photos Austin. Someday I will ditch the City life and move out to the woods.

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Your photos are just simply awesome, Austin! Great job with the camera! Nice pic of the bull nose! Cool snakes, if there is such a thing. Your time lapse of the stars is excellent, as well as the Milky Way panorama. The Hill Country is beautiful, for sure, and you capture it well.

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yup, I was an over the road trucker for almost five years, had to come off the road when my wife got sick. Texas is a great state for truckers, very welcoming. I've been all over from the feeder lots in Dalhart all the way down to Laredo and Brownsville. and of course every inch of I-10, I-20 and I-40.

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Your pictures have a soul. Gorgeous job. And, thanks for sharing!

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Damn, but I planned to retire to that area. Maybe still will. Depends on family that I have up here now. I am, and will always be, Texan.

 

Lived in Trinity, Huntsville, Austin, and Tyler.

 

The Hill Country and the corridor between Austin and San Marcos is God's country. Some of my favorite camping has been on Lake Travis and Lake Bastrop.

 

good times, good place, and good people.

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A few from this past weekend. My roommates and I went out to their ranch for some camping while a cold front blew through, dropping temps below freezing... it was COLD!

hIBGSFQh.jpg

 

 

Unfortunately the brightest part of the Milky Way is hidden behind the sun this time of year.

ZA9yJ3jh.jpg

 

a7a8QwZh.jpg

Edited by Austin_Lyles
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Always a pleasure viewing your photos Austin.

Thanks for the scenery.

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Shot on a Pentax K1000

-SMC Pentax 50mm f/2

-Film was Kodak Tri-X 400

mhuP8z5h.jpg

 

 

 

Shot on a German Exa Ihagee Dresden

-Novoflex 35mm f/3.5

-Film was Kodax Tri-X 400

RSeZ6Ryh.jpg

 

 

So this is a whole new area for me! I developed my first two rolls of film late last night at the school's darkroom with one of my professors. Here's two decent shots that I like.

Edited by Austin_Lyles

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I remember getting to develop my own film when i was in school. There is something about seeing them come to life in the trays that you don't get with a digital camera. I will say though, that the pictures I took were garbage compared to yours.

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Thanks again Wes! It was a pretty interesting process. I was pleasantly surprised with the sharpness of the film compared to my digital camera.

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That's why when Digital came out they said it would never replace film. :rolleyes: You should see some of the 4x5 negatives I made with Ilford 100, and the color transparencies with Ektachrome Lumiere 100... no visible grain at 400x enlargement. But then you have to have a darkroom, and hauling around a 4x5 technical camera is a bit of a chore. ;) Those old K1000s are great cameras if you've got good glass for them. My film camera collection is a Minolta SRT-100, a Minolta X-700, and a Busch Pressman D with the lens off a Linhof Technica.

 

I miss a darkroom. :(

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Glad you are enjoying the delights of real film Austin. I had a small darkroom set up when I was back in high school. Made a mess in my bathroom, but I had a blast.

 

I'm old enough to remember getting a Brownie for my first camera. It was a hand-me-down from my father who I think kept it in a show box in the closet......it looked like this: http://www.brownie-camera.com/11.shtml

 

 

That's why when Digital came out they said it would never replace film. :rolleyes:

 

Yeah, it's truly amazing that the now bankrupt Kodak Corp. invented digital photography. What happened you ask?

Well, the management said exactly what Alan quoted, and they thought that nobody would ever be satisfied with the quality of photographs that could be taken on a phone.......so they sold the technology to Fuji (?) and the rest is history.

 

I read somewhere in business school that "in order to be truly innovative, you might have to stop doing what made you successful in the first place."

 

Good advice for anyone, even knife makers. :huh:

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Oh I know what the 4x5 medium formats can produce. The professor I was with was also developing negatives that night and we scanned his to the computer and my god... the resolution, clarity, sharpness was much better than my dslr currently (Nikon d7000). 35mm film is not as good, but damn near close when scanned. Easily usable.

 

On a more sentimental note, the old exa's I have (yes I have two!) And the Pentax were passed down to me by my grandmother. They were my grandfather's who used them quite a bit when they travelled the world. The cameras have been to Russia, Japan, China, Mexico, Dominican Republic, Italy, and more places. It means a lot to me to be using them again. Hopefully regularly, along with my digital now.

Edited by Austin_Lyles

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I miss the sound of a Hassleblad medium format shutter :(

 

I worked my way through college in a darkroom, but really only did B&W. When digital became prevalent, I gave my wife a point and shoot, and stopped taking pictures all together for about 8 years. Digital is mostly better, but film had its advantages not to mention soul. I could probably still dodge and burn better in a darkroom that I can with Photoshop. (Only because I can't seem to figure out how to use photoshop :rolleyes: )

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You guys are really bringing back some memories.

 

I started in print graphics in 1985 with a top-notch company in Knoxville, TN. We did a little printing but mostly pre-press for offset.

 

They had just moved from separation and screening cameras (like this):

 

nuARC.jpg

 

To digital scanners (like this):

 

Hellscanner.jpg

the company name was actually Hell Graphics (German)

 

 

Here's what cutting edge digital retouching looked like:

 

retouching-old-school.jpg

 

In these days Hassleblad was king and we scanned 35mm, 2 1/4, 4x5 and even 8x10 transparencies.

 

The color and detail was absolutely incredible. And we could do retouching work that was second to none.

 

Then came MacIntosh/Apple. That killed us before digital photography had the chance. Photoshop, Illustrator, Freehand, etc.

 

It couldn't touch us for quality, but the industry lowered its standards for the sake of cost.

 

That ship sailed for me in '97, but it was fun while it lasted.

 

 

 

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