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Kris Lipinski

Pattern welded seax

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Hi All!

Recently I had a great pleasure to forge a seax. Actually I love this technique and the patterns, so I'm happy to share the result of this work :)

Some more details and pictures showing all stages of work you can see on my blog.

http://lipinskimetalart.blogspot.com/2015/10/dziwerowany-saks-pattern-welded-seax.html

 

 

Pattern welded seax knife 18.jpg

Pattern welded seax knife 8.jpg

Pattern welded seax knife 10.jpg

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Beautiful blade, and I like the way it is constructed... I've used a similar method with a spear-pointed broadsax, but it never occurred to me it would look so nice on a type IV. Thanks for documenting your process.

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Thenks :-)

You mean the spin embracing the core? I prefer this construction, seems to be stronger than just cut blade. And I like the strips/lines in the tip part of the blade. I hope in the next couple od weeks I'll forge some more welded knives.

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Nice!!
Looks like a more historically practical construction, not having to cut off any extra material. This has me wondering the original artifacts were constructed this way?

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Beautiful blade, Has that "Mosaic" look using a few simple twists. Elegant and easy. Hats of to you man.

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Thank you for appreciating my efforts :-)

 

It's hard to say how historical blades were constructed. I have never held in my hands an oryginal artifact. I bet there were plenty of solutions, as I've seen in museums ordinary knives, smaller. Most of them had just welded hard blades to soft "fibrous" spins and that's it. No twists, no strip spins. The only picture that seems to show the spin going to the end of the tip is here, but I'm not sure.

http://collections.museumoflondon.org.uk/Online/object.aspx?objectID=object-146014&start=0&rows=1

 

Colin, I agree, probably the ancient balcksmith wouldn't waste material by just cutting off.

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I love that blade. Personally, in my own experience making seaxes, I found it helpful to look at Owen's work, Petr Florianek's, and the information about seaxes that Jeroen was nice enough to provide for us.

 

I realized, sadly fairly recently, that there were very few truly straight lines on the blades. Everything, especially on the belly side and past the clip, is a smooth curve on most blades.

 

Not to say that yours should or should not have more belly or anything. Just saying that I recognized the belly thing only about a year ago.

 

Again, that is one cool blade.

kc

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great work!

I have examined a few that were clipped on the points and then forged, it didn't make and sense to me as well , I couldn't understand why they would waste material. Then I had a thought, if it was a long bar of patternwelded stock, that was then cut in half, on and angle, one side used to form the tip of the knife and the other to form the tang of a second knife that would explain it. others seem to have been welded in such a way that each successive bar is shorter than the last (this shows in the layer compression) my thought is one would be done this way with excess clipped off and the tang forged out and a second blade forges from the cut off. cutting on an angle to preserve the pattern at the point I don't think I have seen or examined any examples with the frame on the point like you have done, but i will be sure to look for it now, that treatment looks amazing and I could totally see it being done in period.

MP

Edited by Matthew Parkinson

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What Matt said. Cool blade!

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I think you all are right. As during ages and across many countries there were at least thousands of blacksmiths and same as nowadays every craftsman do his items in slightly different way.

 

Anyway. I was not doing a copy of an atifact. I did a seax wich is my interpretation :)

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I think you all are right. As during ages and across many countries there were at least thousands of blacksmiths and same as nowadays every craftsman do his items in slightly different way.

 

Anyway. I was not doing a copy of an atifact. I did a seax wich is my interpretation :)

And did it quite well!

I might need to steal the idea for this treatment of the point.. I hope you don't mind.

MP

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Feel free to use it. I have not registered this solution :lol: I'm even proud I could add something from myself, because I learnt a lot reading and watching this forum.

 

regards

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Hi All.

And my next seax :)

Brief description:

Blade lenght: 245mm / 10in

Handle lenght: 114mm / 4,5 in

Overall lenght: 368mm / 15in

Blade width: 31,5mm / 1,28in

Blade thickness: 4,8mm / 0,2in

 

Handle: brass, leather, cherry wood, leather, pear wood, leather.

 

 

Pattern welded seax composite handle 2.jpg

Pattern welded seax composite handle 3.jpg

Pattern welded seax composite handle 4.jpg

Pattern welded seax composite handle 5.jpg

Pattern welded seax composite handle 6.jpg

Pattern welded seax composite handle 7.jpg

Pattern welded seax composite handle 8.jpg

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