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One for the s(crap) bin


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Well here's something frustrating. I was working on this little dagger I made out of some of the end cuts left over from the PW bars I'm using for the Arctic Fire 2016 sword, and I didn't notice this until after etching.

 

1-012.JPG

 

See how the center bar weld line bulges outside the fuller? Here's a shot that illustrates it better.

 

2-013.JPG

 

It looks even worse in person. (;

 

So, now we try again.

 

I only post this because I thought the center bars came out pretty good and I wanted to share a failure. I think it's important to share failures for lots of reasons. As a mostly solitary craft, bladesmithing can make one feel as if you're the only one that screws up. This is especially true when your main source of data on other's work is the internet, where it seems as if marvelous, perfect work flows effortlessly from other smiths.

 

Cheers!

 

Dave

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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It's a shame about that bulge! Other than that its a beautiful blade!

 

I was wondering, is Arctic fire a public event?

"Behold, I have created the smith who blows the fire of coals and produces a weapon for its purpose. I have also created the ravager to destroy;"-Isaiah 54:16

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It's a shame about that bulge! Other than that its a beautiful blade!

 

I was wondering, is Arctic fire a public event?

 

Daniel,

 

AF is free for everyone to watch on-line. While it started as a kind of "hammer in," AF has evolved into a sort of informal organization. It is basically the same core group of six guys that get together in Alaska every so often to collaborate, demonstrate, philosophize and drink beer.

 

Thanks for asking.

Dave

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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Pobody's nerfect all the time, flaws give it character IMHO....... ^_^

Edited by Clifford Brewer

If ya can't be good don't git caught  !!                                        People who say stuff can't be done need to

                                                                                                        git the hell outta the way of people who do stuff   !!!

Show me a man who is called an expert by his peers         

And I will show you a good man to listen to ......

Show me a man who calls himself an expert

and I will show you an egotistical asshole...............!!

 

                             

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Before you toss that away, I'd love to finish it up as a practice piece. Just for fun, no plans for re-sell etc. :)

I have always thought that one man of tolerable abilities may work great changes, and accomplish great affairs among mankind, if he first forms a good plan....

- Benjamin Franklin

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Second here. Don't toss in in the trash. I would make jewelery out of this. Make little pieces and put some silver and gold around.

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I'd grind and polish the edge, without etching, so the pattern outside the fuller does not show up.

That's exactly what I was going to say.

 

 

 

Daniel,

 

AF is free for everyone to watch on-line. While it started as a kind of "hammer in," AF has evolved into a sort of informal organization. It is basically the same core group of six guys that get together in Alaska every so often to collaborate, demonstrate, philosophize and drink beer.

 

Thanks for asking.

Dave

 

What is it that the beer drinking group of Alaskan philosophers are collaborating on this time? Probably secret squirrel stuff that you're not going to talk about yet... haha :ph34r:

“If you trust in yourself. . . believe in your dreams. . . and follow your star. . . you will still get beaten by the people who have spent their time working hard and learning things, the people who weren't so lazy.” ~ Terry Pratchett

 

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I'd grind and polish the edge, without etching, so the pattern outside the fuller does not show up.

 

Jeroen,

 

I thought of this, and J. Arthur Loose suggested the same thing, however two things prevent it from being a good solution.

 

1: The distortion is such that the center line of the two twist bars "leans" so dramatically at the tip that even with only the fuller etched, it would still throw the lines of the piece off dramatically.

 

2: I hate this blade now. Owen Bush once cautioned me about "falling in love" with a piece before you know it can be finished successfully. The flip side of that caution is that if you begin to hate a piece, you just have to let it go.

 

Thanks for the suggestion!

 

Dave

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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That's exactly what I was going to say.

 

 

 

What is it that the beer drinking group of Alaskan philosophers are collaborating on this time? Probably secret squirrel stuff that you're not going to talk about yet... haha :ph34r:

 

We'll be announcing the theme of this year's project very soon. Actually, it's not a secret, so others in the group may already be sharing their projects before the "official" trailer comes out.

 

We'll all be making an individual piece this year instead of a frantic collaboration like 2013. But the pieces will be along a theme. A really cool theme. We did a lot of discussion in Germany and Sweden this month when we all linked up in Europe. It's gonna be cool.

 

Each smith will give a streamed lecture on their piece, the concept behind it, and show WIP photos/video of the making of it. Also, there will be a demo of some technique used in making each piece.

 

Like I said: It's gonna be friggin' cool. More soon.

 

Dave

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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Before you toss that away, I'd love to finish it up as a practice piece. Just for fun, no plans for re-sell etc. :)

 

Thanks Phil and Melf:

 

Actually, I have a bit of a "wall of shame" in my shop on which I put failed pieces of a certain level of completion. This blade will be joining many other pieces. It's my way of reminding myself to approach the craft with humility.

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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2: I hate this blade now. Owen Bush once cautioned me about "falling in love" with a piece before you know it can be finished successfully. The flip side of that caution is that if you begin to hate a piece, you just have to let it go.

 

 

I am so feeling you on this one. It makes you so mad and every time you look at it, it just makes you ill, and feel that hate all over again. I keep my failures too. They are good reminders like you said. They are good to look at from time to time.

“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer."  -Albert Camus

http://www.krakenforge.net/

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I feel your pain, Dave. I can just see me staring down at that (if I were capable of forging something like that) and realizing that there's just nothing that I can do with it. That takes a lot of honesty but it still doesn't make it feel any better.

 

Doug

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Thanks for posting this, somehow comforting to know other people and even really skilled smiths run into problems as well for sure. Gives a means of encouragement when I mess up to know I'm not alone. That pattern is awesome!

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2: I hate this blade now. Owen Bush once cautioned me about "falling in love" with a piece before you know it can be finished successfully. The flip side of that caution is that if you begin to hate a piece, you just have to let it go.

 

Yeah, but at the same time, remind yourself that as an artist, loving your own work once it's done is the hardest thing to do. Striving for perfection helps honing your skills, but working with the flaws that turn up also make a better piece. If you look at the original blades, the torsion bars often waved allover the place. But f.e. in the case of saxes, they fullered the torsion bar, so they could do selective etching and polishing, so you get a well defined pattern despite the torsion bar being anything but straight. They even emphasized it by adding additional grooves next to the fullers, just to make it stand out more. And that made the blade actually look better then if they'd just aimed for a perfectly straight torsion bar, did a flat grind and just etched the whole thing.

Jeroen Zuiderwijk

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/barbarianmetalworking

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well, you already know this, and it makes us all feel better, eventually, "It happens to all of us." I had a couple of months into a dao, only to find a slag inclusion IN THE VERY MIDDLE, at the EDGE. It only showed up when I but the final bevel on the blade.

 

Good for you, for showing the result. It goes a long way to demonstrate to others, earlier along the path of development, how the definition of, "good," evolves. Chasing the receding horizon is what we do. You have done a wonderful job of this through the years.

 

I have a friend who periodically sorts through the stuff I throw under my forge (where I put thwe scrap that I may want to reuse as stock later). He takes a piece or two a year, and reforges them into something for himself. Usually, he makes them into something shorter and bowie-shaped. He gets a lot of pattern welded blades that way. I can't stand to work with them again. I always think I will, but I never do.

 

take care. Thanks for organizing the Artic Fire stuff, and the general esprit de core.

Edited by Kevin (The Professor)

please visit my website http://www.professorsforge.com/

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs

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The blade is beautiful anyway. If you watch original pattern welded swords many of them had waves on pattern welded core. There are a few exemplars with relatively straight lines, but I think they were forged by masters, who had forged plenty of "miss-lined" blades to achieve their prefection.

 

Btw. I don't know if it makes you feel better, but once I forged a billet with pw core and reinforcing steel for the spine and high carbon steel for the cutting edge. When I forged the blade I realized I did it the opposite way :lol: A good lesson must cost, as my dad says :excl:

Edited by Kris Lipinski

lipinskimetalart.blogspot.com

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