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Clay Spencer Inline treadle build?


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Anybody built this hammer before? I've got the main construction done, hammer and anvil and guide is in place, most of the small linkage parts are done, just about ready to start on the flat spring and turnbuckle.

 

I have a couple of questions, mainly the springs. The coil springs Clay list, the plans say "Bend spring into a "U" and heat a spot on the center coil with a torch until it separates. Bend out a 2 turn loop, cold on each end" Am I overthinking things, or just bend in a "U" and heat the middle and grab a couple loops with some pliers and pull them out?

 

The other question I have is about the flat spring. Clay calls for butt welding a pipe with a 1/2" ID to the flat spring. I have a longer than needed piece of 5160 and plan on forging it over with a 1/2" drift to make the eye. Why would a welded pipe be better pivot for a flexible piece like this, and there's no mention of what temper the flat spring should be. I'm assuming a spring temper is what I should heat treat it to, I've got

a Paragon oven that it will fit in so that's no issue.

 

Thanks

 

 

Edited by will52100
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I'm personally familiar with the design, however, I built a #50 mechanical hammer in 2000, on a Champion style Dayton Toggle. We took the ends of the springs (old car leaf springs) and rolled them hot around the wrist pins and left them, no heat treat at all. That hammer get plenty of use and those rolled ends have not moved at all. You may not need to heat treat yours, or go to the trouble of forging the 5160.

 

BTW, if you were thinking of welding the 5160 to itself, 5160 does not self weld very well (if at all) because of the chromium content.

 

Geoff

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Thanks, wasn't planing on forge welding, just rolling the end around a mandrel and then after heat treat truing up with with a 1/2" drill bit. The reason I was thinking of heat treat is the 5160 I've got is in the annealed state. It would save some time and effort if I didn't have to quench and temper. Not hard mind you, just time consuming.

 

One trick for forge welding 5160 or other high chrome steels is to put a thin slip of 1084 or 1095 between them when welding, though I've managed it without, just have to make sure everything is rite.

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I suspect that you are over thinking the whole thing. Clay is a good builder and fabricator, if he says schd 40 is good enough, then it probably is.

 

BTW, I don't know if you've seen this, but it got some interesting ideas in it.

 

Boy, do I miss Grant.

 

Geoff

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Your probably rite, but I wonder at butt welding the pipe on for a pivot. Butt welds are notorious for cracking under stress and it's a high carbon chrome steel that mild steel is welded to. I'm a welder and would still prefer to forge it around a mandrel. I haven't heard of any issues with the weld cracking there, but it's only a mater of time as it's a weak point. Of course I've no idea how much flex the piece takes, so it could be a very long time before it fails.

 

I looked at that hammer a while back, but I've got a power hammer and hydraulic press. What I need is a striker. I do get good use out of the hammer and press, but wanted something to use with hand tooling and to make certain jobs easier, hence the in line vs. the swing arm. I know I'll loose a little efficiency, but for large reduction I'll use the hammer or press.

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