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JeffFogleboch

First tanto

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hey guys this is the first time i have tried a traditional japanese style blade. It is made from 1075 steel from Aldo. Please tell me what you think and critique and give me suggestions so I can continue to improve! Also if anyone knows what to call this hamon that would be appreciated as well! Thanks.

 

-Jeff

 

IMG_6895.jpgIMG_6900.jpgIMG_6899.jpg

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I will try and post a picture of the whole blade once i figure out how to get a good picture of the hamon. I can get it in video but not from a still picture.

 

got it...

 

IMG_6903.jpgIMG_6904.jpgIMG_6905.jpg

 

Edited by JeffFogleboch

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Yes I used Walters forging DVD (which I highly recommend) along with the advice of others. How could you tell??? And thank you!

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Yes I used Walters forging DVD (which I highly recommend) along with the advice of others. How could you tell??? And thank you!

 

 

I honestly dont know how,just had a feeling.lol he does great work,this is a nice piece

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Well thanks again I appreciate the kind words! Let's hope I can make some decent fittings to compliment the blade.

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light it from one end or the other (or both). You will always notice that in photos of hamons by guys who do them a lot, there is a dark background (the Japanese use all black) and the light is coming in obliquely from the end. Think of a hamon as a litte-bitty mountain range, and you want to emphasize it by getting as many shadows and features as possible. A low angle light from the end works better than flat-on.

 

The ideal lighting for a hamon is not at all ideal for overall knife pics, and a lot of pros super-impose the hamon back over the pic of the knife with diffuse lighting.

 

great first tanto, by the way. What did you heat with, and what did you quench in?

 

thanks for sharing. I love hamons.

Edited by Kevin (The Professor)

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Thankyou Kevin! I will try and use these techniques to take better pics. I hear treated with a propane forge and a quench in water for 3 seconds and then onto oil. I made sure to normalize and thermal cycle to get a nice fine grain and a nice hamon

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WELL DONE!!

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That came out great, nicely done. As to what to call the hamon style, to me it looks like a reversed sanbonsugi (three cedars) style.

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excellent, thanks for the info. I use that same interrupted quench quite often.

kc

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