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Spear Point Camp Knife


Wes Detrick
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Here you go. Hand rubbed Satin Finished W2, with some Cocobolo and copper. It's forward weighted for chopping but fast in the hand.

 

Blade is ~7 in long with a total knife length of 12 inches.

 

*Note, that even though it looks it, there is no gap between steel and wood. The wood and steel were both chamfered on the inner edge, to allow for movement in the wood, and for comfort.

 

Please let me know what you think. Your opinions are always valued.

 

-wes

 

 

knife3.jpg

 

closeup2.jpg

 

Peened.jpg

 

sheathed.jpg

 

 

 

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“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer."  -Albert Camus

http://www.krakenforge.net/

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Wow, that must be the nicest satin finish I've ever seen!

what grit is this/how did you do this?

 

I actually like the chamfered edges, they give a very smooth look

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Wes love the blade shape and fit and finish looks great I like the chamfering , I struggle with that transition on almost every full tang knife. Pins look great too very even. Only feed back I would give is changing the angles of the scales at the bolster and maybe a swell or outward curve to the pommell end could have made the knife flow a bit more. Chris

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Hi Wes, nailed it, I'd say. The blade shape and finish, handle contours, plunges/ricassso, damn. With these edges chamfered, did you apply epoxy? And how did you keep it from contaminating the scales edges. Also copper pins with the hammer marks......?

I did a camp for myself with a similar blade shape and the weight forward does help.

 

Gary LT

Edited by Gary LT

"I Never Met A Knife I Didn't Like", (Will Rogers)

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Thanks for the compliments everyone; It is always humbling :) Glad that you all like it. I do, and I am not normally a full tang guy, but that is what the customer wanted so that is what he got.

 

 

Wes love the blade shape and fit and finish looks great I like the chamfering , I struggle with that transition on almost every full tang knife. Pins look great too very even. Only feed back I would give is changing the angles of the scales at the bolster and maybe a swell or outward curve to the pommell end could have made the knife flow a bit more. Chris

 

Actually there is swell on the pommel. The handle is an elongated hour glass shape, and fits nicely in your hand. Chalk it up to my crappy photography that you can't see it. I have attached another crappy picture to the post so you can see. Unfortunately, the picture still doesn't do it justice, but you get the idea :) You can always see the tapered tang in the picture as well.

I would give the chamfering a try, it works out pretty well and looks better in person. Just go easy and take a little off at a time.

 

 

Hi Wes, nailed it, I'd say. The blade shape and finish, handle contours, plunges/ricassso, damn. With these edges chamfered, did you apply epoxy? And how did you keep it from contaminating the scales edges. Also copper pins with the hammer marks......?
I did a camp for myself with a similar blade shape and the weight forward does help.

Gary LT

 

I did apply epoxy. The tang was was hollow ground right in the center and down the length of the tang on both sides, so there are large recesses for the epoxy to sit in. The wood was also roughed up with a dremel bit too. Plus, there are holes drilled so it creates an epoxy "bridge" for what that's worth. When I am gluing it up, there is epoxy leaking out around the edge, but I am there with q-tips and some acetone to get any that seeps out. I can get most, but some still makes it out. So, once the epoxy is set, I have this brass needle that I made from 1/8th inch brass rod. One end comes to a point, and the other end has a rounded chisel point. Both have been sanded out to like 2000 grit and then buffed with some rouge, so they are mirrored. I use those very carefully to pick out any glue boogers that are left over. Let me know if that is unclear, and I will PM you a picture of the brass needle.

As for the pins, they are just peened with a super small ball peen hammer. Very carefully, so the wood doesnt split, and you don't mush the wood with the peen of the hammer. Regardless I always manage to miss at least once, and wind up sanding it out afterwords much to my unhappiness. Hope that helps with your questions. Thanks!

 

 

taper.jpg

“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer."  -Albert Camus

http://www.krakenforge.net/

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go with what the customer wants, for sure. That came out looking good. Great job on finish, too.

kc

please visit my website http://www.professorsforge.com/

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs

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Thanks Kevin and Wade! I am glad you both like it.

 

@kevin - I offered that hidden tang knives are just as capable, but did not push it. He likes what he likes, and who am I to dispute that.

“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer."  -Albert Camus

http://www.krakenforge.net/

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I really like that one.

 

Speak a little bit about how you shape those contoured handles... tools & method.

 

It looks like it would feel great in the hand.

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That is a very pleasing shape, all of the lines flow beautifully in and out of each other in great harmony! I also like what you did with the chamfered wood and steel for the handle, it makes the blade seem more three dimensional in the last photo with the sheath. What grit did you finish up to? I really really like this one! and it looks like it may have some autohamon?

 

I cannot say enough good things about this blade, you really killed it my friend! :D

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I really like that one.

 

Speak a little bit about how you shape those contoured handles... tools & method.

 

It looks like it would feel great in the hand.

 

Thanks Don, i'm glad you like it! The handle is very comfortable I am happy to say.

As for their construction... I cut my scales from a block and then finished the insides of them first so they would be completely flat and give me a good point to do the rest from. I clamped one scale to the knife and then drilled the holes for the pins. Then I taped both scales together and drilled the second scale's holes, using the first scale as pilot holes. I then used temp pins and tape to hold the blocks together and squared them away on the belt grinder.

I had drawn out the profile of the scales and the contours of the scales before I started, and then made templates out of thin cardboard.

I got the profile roughed in on both, attached the scales to the knife using the temp pins, and then evened this up on my belt grinder and by hand. I would attach them frequently to the blade using those pins to make sure that my lines were good.

Once the profiling was done, I took the contour template and laid it on top edge of the scales and traced it out. I used the same template for both so they would be as identical as possible. I then roughed them out on the grinder. I was constantly attaching the scales together with the temp pins during the process so I could examine them and make sure that they were as close to identical I could get. Once they were roughed in, I knocked the corners off with the top wheel of my grinder. Once the basic shape was done, then I just worked my way up in grit by hand with sandpaper. It was at this point that I put the chamfer in on the scales and evened things out with low grit paper. I did the chamfer using 200 grit sand paper, and just made sure it was even all the way around. I finished the scales out to 600 grit and then buffed them out with wax on the buffing wheel.

Sorry for running away at the mouth, but I hope that was explained well. Let me know if it wasn't, or a part of it wasn't or if there is anything else that I can poorly explain :)

 

 

 

That is a very pleasing shape, all of the lines flow beautifully in and out of each other in great harmony! I also like what you did with the chamfered wood and steel for the handle, it makes the blade seem more three dimensional in the last photo with the sheath. What grit did you finish up to? I really really like this one! and it looks like it may have some autohamon?

 

I cannot say enough good things about this blade, you really killed it my friend! :D

 

That's very high praise Emiliano, and very much appreciated. Thank you :)

The blade was sanded out to 800 grit and then I used a grey Ultrafine Scotchbrite pad to go over it to satiny it up a little more.

And damn if you don't have a good eye! Yes, there was some auto-hamon going on. I did a very very short (like 20 seconds) etch to bring it out. It was enough to etch the steel so that when I sanded what little oxides were there off, it left behind the hamon. You don't see it very much in regular light, but under the right light, you can see it very well. Didn't think anyone would see that.

“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer."  -Albert Camus

http://www.krakenforge.net/

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Wow, that must be the nicest satin finish I've ever seen!

what grit is this/how did you do this?

 

I actually like the chamfered edges, they give a very smooth look

 

I totally missed your question! Sorry about that.

 

I handed sanded it starting from about 400 grit. Before that was belt. I did the whole alternating directions with different grits to make sure I got rid of the previous scratches. I sanded up to 800 grit. The last bit of sanding was done in one direction only, pulling the sandpaper back from the plunge to the tip. Once that was all done, I took an Ultrafine Scotchbrite pad and did the same kind of strokes down the length. It produces a really uniform finish. Don't get me wrong, it is not perfect because if you fart on it wrong a small scratch appears, but you can only see those in the brightest of lights.

“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer."  -Albert Camus

http://www.krakenforge.net/

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Damn nice knife, Wes!

-----------------------------------------------

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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Don't get me wrong, it is not perfect because if you fart on it wrong a small scratch appears, but you can only see those in the brightest of lights.

 

Best quote of recent memory! :lol: Right up there with Dan P. saying "onanistic feats of herculean vigour."

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