Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone,

 

With tax time coming in the near future I will have some money for a better anvil. Does anyone have any feedback about the Papa Rhino anvil since it's been made in the US (post 2012)? I have found several reviews around 2009-2011 when they were made in China but can't seem to find much feedback on them since they have been made in the US. The price is really very good and it looks nice. And I really like that it's made in the US. So it's at the top of my short list. Next question does anyone have any reviews of the 260 pound Big Blu anvil?

 

Thanks,

 

Kent

Edited by Kent Swedlund
Link to post
Share on other sites

No, right forum.

 

I'd just guess that no one who actually owns one has come across your post yet.

 

They are out of my current price range, but dang, they do look nice!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I work at a foundry in Spokane and made my own anvil there out of an air hardening alloy, and love mine. I know we don't make the Rhinos, so I sent an email to a buddy that works at another local foundry (about a quarter mile away from the Rhino folks) to see if they make them. Here are a few observations I had based on my anvil build and their website:

  1. Air hardening alloys, and thus through hardened anvils, are great.
  2. They aren't "just tempered", or at least they shouldn't be. They should be austenitized then fan cooled, then tempered at a pretty hot temperature, several hundred degrees up to about 1000F.
  3. My anvil is harder at about 55-56 HRC (vs 52 of theirs). Mine shows where an errant hammer strike occurs, but does not leave an actual indentation I can feel. A softer anvil may not be as forgiving.

Edited to add: I will report back when I hear back from my buddy to see what he says about them if they are the manufacturer.

Edited by Jerrod Miller
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Good news everyone! My buddy does indeed make those anvils and gave me a little info on them. Obviously I won't be sharing the chemistry, but it does look good, as does their process. Sounds like they only make a batch about once a year (this is just an interesting point, neither good nor bad). The 52 HRC is actually a minimum, and the max is about 56. While this may seem like a big spread, on something like an anvil it isn't. It is also a very good range to be in. Were I in need of an anvil I would certainly have this one in my top 2-3. Then again, since I could just swing by and pick it up on my way home from work (thus no shipping) it would probably be the strong favorite. This one would probably get as high of marks as I could give without actually using one. They are making some more at the foundry next month. Maybe I'll have to schedule a time to swing in and check them out.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

So, I now work at the foundry that makes these.  As we are about to "ship" (put them on our truck and drive about a block away to deliver them) a batch of these I did a bit of inspection.  They look pretty nice, and the rebound is excellent (85-90% on a ball-bearing drop test).  The biggest thing I am not thrilled about is that the horn doesn't really come to a point.  It looks like the tip broke off, but I have seen the pattern and can assure you that they are all like that and it is intentional.  Incandescent Ironworks does the last bit of grinding/polish on these, so maybe he does some more to it.  At any rate, these are indeed quality anvils.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...