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John Rosendahl

How in all that is holy/unholy was this made?

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It's mosaic damascus! I once saw an american flag pin made out of mosaic damascus, under a magnifying glass they could tell that there were all 50 stars all with 5 points on them. The sheer skill and time that knife probably took is mind boggling, that knife is probably worth a small fortune to the right collector.

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Yep, it's the highest development of pattern-welding. Done in a sealed tube with shim stock and powdered steel to male a bar of each elwment, then cut, tiled, and carefully welded into a bar to be ground into a blade. Each tube starts about 40 - 50mm square, then drawn down to the size you see under a press. There's only a handful of makers who are that good at it. I have seen it done, but I am far from able to do it!

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that almost looks like a Shane Taylor knife to me, here is one of his i am a huge fan of

 

 

Dragon_1_Large_Web_view.jpg

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Speaking of Holy Mosaic Damascus, ABS MS Ray Rybar does some stunning work with this method. A lot of his pieces (blades and other objects) have images, figures, or entire biblical verses worked into the steel. I know Ray and have had the privilege of handling many of his works. The text and images go straight through the bars and appear as a mirror image on the other side. I'm searching for some with the writing on them, but here is one of his swords.

http://www.americanbladesmith.com/ipboard/index.php?/gallery/image/416-king-of-kings-damascus-dagger-raymond-rybar-master-smith/

Edited by Joshua States

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Daryl is certainly one of the best at making steel and one of the first as well. [He got his start about the same time as Moran.] Something that makes this blade so ingenious is that he put the flag into the initial billet on an angle giving it a sense of depth. As you can see on the finished blade, the banner reads USA from both front & back so he had to San Mai the initial billet.

 

http://darylmeier.com/gallery/gallery-bushbowie.jpg

 

I never asked Daryl how he did this but a method for making a complex pattern like this that was sometimes used was to use acid with a sheet of resist in the shape of the finished design applied to the steel sheet and allow the acid to eat completely through the steel and then fill with a 2 or 4% nickel powder.

 

Today it can also be done by computerized water jet. Either way you must stack the thin pieces exactly on top of one another, fill with powder, and then put in the canister & weld. The real trick is to weld the can without distortion and that's difficult. (grin) Don't ask how I know. These blades have also been four-wayed & stacked making it that much more susceptible to distortion. (Blades like this are usually profiled & beveled by stock removal so as not to distort the pattern any more than necessary.) The only guys that I know of that are doing much of this are Raymond Rybar, Doug Ponzio & Don Hanson III but I'm sure there are others. I will occasionally use some powder in a can mosaic but can't come close to their abilities with it.

 

Gary

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Wow these are truly amazing works of art. I wonder what the material loss is on pieces like these.

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Material loss is huge, 60% or better depending on the pattern. It's just the cost of doing business.

 

Geoff

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Ray(mond) Rybar sell a DVD called "Scripture Damascus" where he explain how he do it.

Sure take time and work!!

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S.Cruse....I believe the dragon steel is made by Pierre Reveardy. He used a wire EDM to cut a two blocks of steel and then switched out the parts and welded them back together. This provided both a positive and a negative block

 

Daniel

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Ray Rybar's method is actually pretty slick. He showed me how he puts it together when I visited him just before he moved out to Camp Verde. He actually uses thin sheet that he puts a resist on and then etches through to lay out the words/patterns. Then he stacks up the cleaned sheet stock in a can and fills the voids with powder. It was kind of neat to see. :)

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some of the Swedish guys come close to this. They don't use images quite as much, but do all of the other stuff. Andre Anderssen, as an example (if I spelled his last name right0.

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Just in case anyone is still interested, I'm willing to bet quite a lot that the the blade showed in the original post was made by using damascus from Matthias Styrefors.

For mosaic damascus, Styrefors, Johan Gustafsson and above all, the legendary Conny Persson is the top blokes in Sweden. Unfortunatly Perssons and Styrefors webpages are not updated very well. but if anyone is interested, some high quality photos of their work is floating around the net.

 

//DAQ

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I'm with John on this one. I think I'll just go back to making guns. Damn!

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