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I was able to make enough time to finish this up this afternoon.      There are a couple of small gaps on one side that I'm not too happy about, but the solder took so I'm going with it

Challenge project is in the clamps. Dun Dun Dunnnnnnnn. Had to add an osage wood spacer to account for drilling my holes too large in the 2nd brass piece learned a few things i should have done differ

It's starting to look like a knife. I still have a ways to go though.

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So it wasn't until Gabriel James linked to this post/thread in another forum that I realized I left it hanging without another challenge project.

Here is is guys: Hidden/stub tang with sculpted guard and spacer. Solid one piece handle and single set pin. Materials choice is yours. The object here is to achieve the curve and flow from wood through the spacer and guard to create the index finger pocket.

This one has an O-1 blade, nickel-silver guard and spacer, black paper spacer and ironwood handle.

Stub Hunter (7)-opt (1).jpg

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Excuse the ignorance Joshua but I have seen paper spacers mentioned a fair bit. I assume there is more to it than simply putting a piece of paper into the handle. What is the material, please? Thanks

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What we refer to as paper spacers are actually vulcanized paper which is actually a cellulose based plastic fibre board. So it's kind of paper, but more plastic really with higher heat tolerance and durability

 

Edited by Timothy Artymko
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I would suggest switching that for G10.
Paper will shrink over time and you will get a gap in the transition between guard and second spacer.
I'm in,
Might take me a little bit but I will get to one.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Challenge project is in the clamps. Dun Dun Dunnnnnnnn. Had to add an osage wood spacer to account for drilling my holes too large in the 2nd brass piece learned a few things i should have done differently.. Like that i need to make more knives with ricasso's. My ricasso is a smidge big- as is the tang (height wise) 20495727_10154513636430146_1383260468_o.jpg

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How are you able to get the stainless steel guard ground so smoothly transitioning to the wood without accidently biting into the wood as you grind??

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3 hours ago, JeffM said:

How are you able to get the stainless steel guard ground so smoothly transitioning to the wood without accidently biting into the wood as you grind??

What are you using to grind? 

I typically shape handles and guards together using an 80 grit belt on a hard platen.  As long as you are careful not to dig the edges the belt in, you should be able to grind on both and keep them uniform.  

In the above knife, I would imagine that Josh ground them a single unit being careful not to dig to hard into the wood.  As you move up in the grits, the ability remove lots of material diminishes so the chances of significant changes to the handle are smaller.

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I was struggling with that as well. Basically i worked backwards i epoxy and JB weld the guard on, after it cured i epoxied the spacer and the 2nd brass piece in. then as a unit i sculpted them mostly to shape before adding my spacer (because the gap was too large- oops) and the rest of the handle. The handle is completed on mine i just need to go back and repolish the blade thanks to some flash rush and epoxy everywhere /sigh. My handle came out just a tad on the small side, due to shaping the guard first, it forced my handle to be a little slimmer than i wanted.

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Hi Wes

For heavy material removal I used a hard wheel grinder....then when I get close to the shape I want I have been stepping into my belt grinder starting at 80 grit and working my way up....based on the descriptions from yourself and Gabriel I'm of the opinion that I'm putting too much pressure on hence the digging into the softer material at the edges....

As for the Brass guards I press them on with a 20 ton press brake with flattening dies...I've never used epoxy on the guards...only place I use it is on the handle material along with either pins or cutlery rivets

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On 8/7/2017 at 3:00 PM, JeffM said:

How are you able to get the stainless steel guard ground so smoothly transitioning to the wood without accidently biting into the wood as you grind??

I do this one of two ways:

1. I get the whole thing assembled and very tight, but not glued up. I use blind alignment pins to hold the spacer to the wood and a dummy pin to hold the tang into the wood. The guard and spacer are fit tight to the tang with no wobble or play. The handle pin is also very tight and there is no play or wobble there either. Then I wrap the blade in a blue paper shop towel and put it point down into my post vice. Shaping is done with rasps and files and then hand sanded with paper on a rubber block.Once it is totally done except for 3-stage buffing, I remove the dummy pin and glue it all together with a long pin so I can dome the heads afterward. This method allows for final finishing of the guard face and blade before final assembly.

2. Finish the blade and face of the guard 100% because you will never get back to them later. Rough shape the guard, spacer and handle and glue the whole thing up. Work it with rasps, files and hand sanding until complete. The pin in the handle ends up with flush finish (not domed heads) Buff the handle out.

There might be a little slack belt work involved in both methods as well, but be very careful! It is so easy to slip on a slack belt and cut a nasty bit into the blade. On a knife like this, it is best to leave the machines out of the picture. Slow down a little and use hand tools. It is much more precise and you are less likely to screw up.

Edited by Joshua States
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Ok heres my finished project. Alot of firsts in this one for me. There are some glaring issues but its a fully functional knife-- just needs to key tweaks here and there... maybe a different process. Interestingly enough I had started a cable damascus billet like a year ago and .. i thought i had cut the billet into 3rds and restacked it. I got busy and never got around to it.. COme to find out! I actually set it up with a 1018 jacket instead.. SO i lucked up and actually kept the core in the middle and fairly even.... sigh.. anyway without further adue (sp?)

 

20793605_10154542378510146_1085240140_o.jpg20746762_10154542378595146_710929920_o.jpg20747740_10154542378500146_166925850_o.jpg20771932_10154542378540146_1060662171_o.jpg20773712_10154542378570146_507225176_o.jpg

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  • 2 years later...

Well, we can all see that Gabriel James took this thread very seriously, and look at him now.

There's another crop of beginners on the forum and I thought I'd throw another challenge project up. The full tang design. Frankly, most beginners start out making  this style of knife, but they often just glue two slabs to the sides and call it good. The challenge here is putting metal bolsters on the blade and getting a nice smooth finger pocket.

There are several WIP threads on this style of knife already on the forum, so you all have plenty of resources to learn how to do it.

This knife has 416 stainless steel bolsters on a 5160 blade and micarta scales. Materials and blade steel are maker's choice. These bolsters are pinned on with through pins that are invisible to the naked eye. If you really want a challenge, taper the tang so it gets thinner at the heel.

Original (1).jpg

Original (2).jpg

Edited by Joshua States
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I'm trying a sub-hilt handle for the first time, 60 knives in I've done most of the variations but only in brass and copper.  For the sub-hilt I'm thinking brass and rosewood.

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5 hours ago, Gerhard Gerber said:

I'm trying a sub-hilt handle

I need to do one of those

Edited by Joshua States
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Fired up the forge today and got started.  Since I scrapped the integral that I was working on, this one will be a good replacement for it (if I can pull it off :D).

20191005_193043.jpg

I may end up shortening the blade, time will tell.  I did decide to go all out and forged the beginnings of a taper into the tang.

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I will accept the challenge. My wife needs a good hunting knife so this will be it. I have to have it finished before November 15th so she has it before opening day of rifle season.

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On 10/5/2019 at 5:35 PM, Alex Middleton said:

I may end up shortening the blade, time will tell.  I did decide to go all out and forged the beginnings of a taper into the tang.

Shortening the blade was my first thought. Other than that, it looks like a great start.

 

21 hours ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

I will accept the challenge. My wife needs a good hunting knife so this will be it. I have to have it finished before November 15th so she has it before opening day of rifle season.

Sounds like a plan. You should be able to do it.

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Got it ready for heat treat today. 

20191012_204353.jpg

 

Theres a .040" taper to the tang overall, so I had to shim it up .020" while drilling the pin holes.20191012_203726.jpg

 

Hopefully I can get it heat treated tomorrow and then start trying to figure out the whole bolster thing.

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