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Retro geometry lesson: 3 points define a plane

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The geometry is the easy part.  My only soldering experience is sweating copper pipes together.  I've never tried sticking two flat faces to each other.  I need to look up Brian Dougherty's thread on how he does his bolsters a reread it a couple of dozen times.

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Bolsters and scales are roughed out.

20191013_171058.jpg

 

The blade survived heat treat and is ready for hand sanding.  It picked up a slight wobble in the edge which is going to be a royal pain to sand out, but it should clean up.  The edge may just end up a bit thinner than intended.

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10 hours ago, Alex Middleton said:

The geometry is the easy part.  My only soldering experience is sweating copper pipes together.  I've never tried sticking two flat faces to each other.  I need to look up Brian Dougherty's thread on how he does his bolsters a reread it a couple of dozen times.

I was referring to the pins holding the bolsters. Whether the bolsters are soldered or peen-pinned, 3 pins should be used.

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That's a fair point.  I thought you were referring to shimming the tang to keep the holes perpendicular to the center axis.  I can see how three pins would have some advantages over two, especially if the surfaces don't mate perfectly.

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I managed to finally get the blade finished, as well as drill the bolsters and do a bit more profiling on them.20191020_131540.jpg

 

Now I just need to decide at what point to solder them on.  I think I may pin the bolster and scales on to the blade to finish shaping them so I can do most of the finish work on the bolsters before soldering.

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It's starting to look like a knife.20191026_064807.jpg

I still have a ways to go though.

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Doing great stuff Alex!

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There is only one thing I can think of in retrospect that you missed which may cause you some trouble. 

That is the front edge of the bolsters.

You rolled the bolsters down the front rather than beveling them. I bevel them because it allows me to finish the front faces off the knife.

Once those are soldered, or pinned, in place, you can never get back to the front faces of the bolsters without jacking up the blade finish.

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I've been trying to think of a way around that.  I realized that was going to be a problem about 5 seconds after I got done roughing them out.  It's one of the reasons that I haven't soldered them on yet.  I'm thinking it's going to take some creative taping on the blade to protect it while I do the final finishing on the bolsters.  Next time I'll remember the beveling idea,  seems like it would be much simpler.

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If you haven't soldered them on yet, can you just make a new set?

Edited by Joshua States

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18 hours ago, Alex Middleton said:

I've been trying to think of a way around that.  I realized that was going to be a problem about 5 seconds after I got done roughing them out.  It's one of the reasons that I haven't soldered them on yet.  I'm thinking it's going to take some creative taping on the blade to protect it while I do the final finishing on the bolsters.  Next time I'll remember the beveling idea,  seems like it would be much simpler.

If you haven't soldered them on yet, can you just make a new set?

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I could.  The only problem is that I'm far to stubborn to waste the time and materials when all it will cost me to use what I have is extra time and patience.  Especially when I dont have enough Blackwood on hand to redo the scales.

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On 10/29/2019 at 3:37 PM, Alex Middleton said:

I could.  The only problem is that I'm far to stubborn to waste the time and materials when all it will cost me to use what I have is extra time and patience.  Especially when I dont have enough Blackwood on hand to redo the scales.

Why would you have to redo the scales?

1. Cut two pieces of bolster stock and super glue them to each other.

2. Square them up together so they are the same size and bevel the outside faces to match the bevel on the existing  bolsters/scales.

3. Take them apart (heat with a propane torch) and super glue 1 onto the knife up against the scale. Drill the 3 holes. Remove (tap on edge with small hammer) and repeat for the other side.

4. Glue them back together with the drilled faces touching each other and make the front bevels match.

 

Same amount of time and less patience needed.

 

DOC110119-11012019140024.png

 

Edited by Joshua States

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I've spent the last two weekends getting the barn cleaned out and ready for winter so there hasn't been a whole lot of time to play with this.  This morning I was finally able to get the bolsters soldered in place.  I decided to try the white out as a solder block trick.

 

20191109_080807.jpg

 

It seemed to work pretty well.

 

20191109_082723.jpg

 

There wasn't any bleed through from the solder.  I glued the scales on and it's currently clamped up waiting for the epoxy to cure.

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I was able to make enough time to finish this up this afternoon. 20191109_165116.jpg20191109_165148.jpg20191109_165130.jpg

 

 

There are a couple of small gaps on one side that I'm not too happy about, but the solder took so I'm going with it.  Other than a couple of other minor issues it turned out pretty good.

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Nice job Alex.

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Thanks.  I'm not sure if this one really fit the challenge that you put out there, but I know I learned a lot while I was doing it.  I do want to thank you for proposing these projects though.  I think it's a great way to help guys like me to open ourselves up to different techniques and try new things that we otherwise might not do.

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On 10/29/2019 at 3:37 PM, Alex Middleton said:

the only problem is that I'm far to stubborn to waste the time and materials

Were we separated at birth? 

I do this too, and justify it as all I'm doing is learning different techniques....

 

Good job on the knife.  Looks pretty, comfortable, and functional (sounds like my ideal girl...).  What more could a guy want? 

Edited by billyO
speling

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Lol, Thanks! 

I think I view it more as self punishment for missing something obvious, or doing something dumb when I knew it was a bad idea in the first place.  My hope is that someday, when I'm sick enough of forcing myself to do things the hard way, I'll learn to do it the easy way from the beginning. :D

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Nice work Alex.  Joshua's projects are good learning exercises and it seems you took this one to heart.

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Well done!!! I got so into smashing things with my new power hammer I havent made time to get my surface grinder wired up yet and the VFD programmed. I really wanna do this one justice. Maybe this weekend I will get started.

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