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Joshua States

What did you do in your shop today?

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On 8/31/2018 at 9:04 PM, Joshua States said:

@Gerhard I am loving those colors. What is that?

Homebrew micarta, the dark green is wool cloth, the neon green is a synthetic......and the blue is denim thickness but not denim....no real idea :D

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First taste of this years maple syrup wine!20180913_210611.jpg

It's a little on the sweet side, but not too bad overall.

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managed to put up 3 new LED lights in the workshop. now i can see what im doing :D

also acquired a drill press. small little guy, but a massive improvement to everything i do

IMG_20180830_180331[1].jpg

Edited by Ross Vosloo

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10 hours ago, Alex Middleton said:

First taste of this years maple syrup wine!20180913_210611.jpg

It's a little on the sweet side, but not too bad overall.

Tell me more of this maple syrup wine you speak of....  is it traditional?  How is it made?  Inquiring minds (and their wives who love anything maple) want to know!

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I didn't know dandelion would make for good wine :) or spirits for that matter , could make for an interesting experiment

 

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Definitely not traditional.  I started playing around with it a few years ago when I was attempting to "condense" some maple syrup into vodka.  The vodka didn't work out well, (with limited free time I need to pick my hobbies and being good at "condensing" alcohol bearing liquid is an art form that I'm not willing to dedicate the time to mastering) but I found that I somewhat enjoyed the taste of the pre-finished product.  Ever since then I mix up a batch or two each year with different syrup/water concentrations and different yeasts in an effort to refine the finished product.

As far as a process goes, I'm a pretty simple guy.  Syrup, water, and yeast, mix, and let sit with a bubbler.  I started this batch back in April/May and honestly forgot about it until I found it while I was cleaning the barn last weekend.  This batch was 1.75 gallons of syrup to 3.25 gallons of water, with a turbo distilling yeast.  I have yet to open the other bucket, but it was made with the same syrup/water ratio and a champagne yeast.  I'm somewhat eager to see what the difference in flavor will be between the two.

I wouldn't say that it's "good" wine, and I'm sure a sommelier would probably puke if he drank some, but I like it well enough and it makes your head spin after a glass or two.  Besides, we usually have more syrup than we know what to do with every year so it's kind of fun to play around with it.  I'm going to cut the ratio back to 1.25/3.75 on the next batch and see if I can dry it out a little bit.

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Thanks!  If the turbo yeast didn't dry it I don't know what would.  Although turbo is also known for producing off-flavors in stuff that isn't triple-distilled.  I think the champagne yeast ought to taste better.  It will go up to around 16% ABV (as opposed to 20% for the turbo), so it won't be dry at that ratio.  I like the flavor profile of Red Star Montrachet yeast (now renamed something like "classic cru" for no apparent reason), and it'll go to 14% easy.  

Of course, down here we don't have a lot of maple syrup for cheap.  A gallon would run me in the $60-120 range...:ph34r:  I only have one sugar maple tree, so making it in quantity is not an option.  But I bet I can brew up a wicked gallon of wine (or hooch, anyway) from a couple pints of syrup in a gallon of water...ooh, I bet a mead yeast would do extra good!  For that matter, I bet a blend of sourwood honey and maple syrup would make a killer brew, probably in every sense of the word given my experience with meads! :lol:

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32 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

  For that matter, I bet a blend of sourwood honey and maple syrup would make a killer brew, probably in every sense of the word given my experience with meads! :lol:

That would definitely do it! Mead and I have had a couple of long nights together.

I tried the turbo yeast on this batch to see how high I could get the alcohol content.  I don't think that it was worth the trade off in flavors.  I'll give that Red Star yeast a try on the next batch and see how it comes out.  I really should start doing 1 gallon batches instead of 5.  At the rate I'm going it'll take me 20 years to get a recipe that I'm really happy with. :D

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Thanks for reminding me of home hooch, the Elder berrys are in full  ripeness now and I

love to make cordials out of it..........................B)

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Wheew!  I just tried the other batch.  I don't think my tastebuds will forgive me for a while!:wacko::blink:

Anybody need 5 gallons of maple vinegar?:lol:

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On ‎9‎/‎14‎/‎2018 at 6:49 PM, Alex Middleton said:

Wheew!  I just tried the other batch.  I don't think my tastebuds will forgive me for a while!:wacko::blink:

Anybody need 5 gallons of maple vinegar?:lol:

Try using it to etch a hamon and see how well it works? 

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It wasn't today, it was yesyerday, but I got some forging done! I had to wait until after 5 PM so the shop had started to cool down (it was 111*F in there).

Started forging (3).JPG

That's two San-mai kitchen knives with the initial tapers put in.

Started forging (1).JPG

And two pieces of 1 inch O-1 drill rod forged down to 1"'x3/8" flat bars.

Started forging (2).JPG

 

Edited by Joshua States

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Made a set of power hammer dies with half 3/8" (9.525mm) fuller / round, for my blacksmithing mentor.  Used 2" 1040 

 

IMG_0977.JPG

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Last weekend really but I’ve been a bit busy. Melted 170g of beeswax out of honeycomb. Now I just have to dig around the site for a cutler’s resin recipe.

EA593643-63A9-4F0B-8A74-5080E74B87B1.jpeg

Edit: This is good:

 

Edited by Charles du Preez

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I bought a Dayton dual arbor grinder mounted on a piece of C channel with a pipe welded to a spare tire a couple of years ago; the assembly was wobbly. I cut the pipe off the spare tire and remounted it to a track brake drum, and remounted the grinder. I had a drill sharpening fixture from Craftsman that i bought used 12 years ago but have never used, mounted it to the new setup, and sharpened a bunch of dull drill bits that have been lurking in the shop for far too long. Excellent!.

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I have a question for the people who make kitchen knives or thin ones that flex alot. How do you grind the tips with them flexing so much? I have a grizzly 2x72 and grind free hand because that's most comfortable for me. However, I can't apply enough pressure to effectively take off material because it heats up to fast, maybe in a second, and burns my thumbs. Do you have a jig that backs the blade and prevents flexing or slower speed or just do it even slower by hand?

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18 minutes ago, Mike Ward said:

I have a question for the people who make kitchen knives or thin ones that flex alot. How do you grind the tips with them flexing so much? I have a grizzly 2x72 and grind free hand because that's most comfortable for me. However, I can't apply enough pressure to effectively take off material because it heats up to fast, maybe in a second, and burns my thumbs. Do you have a jig that backs the blade and prevents flexing or slower speed or just do it even slower by hand?

I use a tool rest and a push stick, fresh belt, and grinder speed appropriate to the task (fast when I'm hogging, slowed down when getting closer to the final grind). Cool the blade between passes. Lots of patience too. 

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I have a question for the people who make kitchen knives or thin ones that flex alot. How do you grind the tips with them flexing so much? I have a grizzly 2x72 and grind free hand because that's most comfortable for me. However, I can't apply enough pressure to effectively take off material because it heats up to fast, maybe in a second, and burns my thumbs. Do you have a jig that backs the blade and prevents flexing or slower speed or just do it even slower by hand?

For the fillet knives I've made I'll take a thin board and cut it to the profile of the blade, then use two spring clamps to hold the blade to it when grinding (and sanding for that matter).  I'll move the clamps around so they're not in the way too much.  This gives a good solid backing when grinding and sanding. 

As far as dealing with the heat... I only use fresh belts when grinding thin stuff, they don't build up heat as fast as a dull belt will.  Dunk often... I do 90% of my grinding before the blade is heat-treated so it doesn't really matter if I get it hot while hogging.  When I quench I'll keep the blade in the quenchant until it drops past the pearlite nose (around 800°) then I clamp it between two thick steel plates, which hold it nice and flat as it cools.  I can avoid most warping this way.

Edited by GEzell

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I did a demo for the Athens chapter of the Alabama Forge Council yesterday, these blades are the result.  29 layer 4 bar composites, I should have twisted tighter but overall not bad... 1084 and 15n20.

IMG_20180922_161733229.jpg

IMG_20180922_163402269.jpg

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Thanks guys, I like that backing idea GEzell, I'll try it. I also do most for the grinding before heat treatment and clamp it between two pieces of wood for the same reason. I'll keep fresh belts in mind too.

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Had to turn the shop into a meat processing station today.  My son and I both managed to fill tags yesterday during our early doe season.

20180922_090959.jpg

He got to shoot first, and his was a beast, mine was just a 1.5 year old that wasn't smart enough to run after he shot. :D

3 hours of cutting later:

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50 lbs of meat heading to the grinder, and there's another 20 that we'll be smoking into jerky next weekend.  Busy weekend!

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Congrats I'm hoping I will be able to hunt this year. My wife already bought her tags but I'm holding off until I'm sure I can make it into the woods. No sense in donating all that money if I cant use them.

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No doubt man.  They definitely don't give tags away anymore.  Hopefully you'll be getting around well enough by Nov. 15th to be able to make it out.

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Took a bit of a blade break recently. My/our jet boat club hosted the lake powell chalenge/poker run a couple weeks ago for the 4th year.

This year the event raised a mind blowing 632k.  Antelope marina gives us a free houseboat for a week....and all we have to do is cook burgers and dogs for a few hours.

Performance boating has been my main hobby for forever....but I have to say I spent way more time behind the grinder this summer than the wheel of my boat.

Managed to get the handle on my bowie last weekend. I did get one little grinder kiss on the bottom left of the guard.

Which was pure stupidity on my part....I had the front/sides of the handle fitted perfect before epoxying them on.

Much to my surprise I did manage to get a stainless aeb-l good and hard. It skates a file just like my carbon steel blades.

The other two blades I made a while back before I knew how to make a blade sharp.

They had real crappy saber grinds....so I decided to try and free hand them sharp.

I am pretty pleased at how they came out.....at least they are sharp AF now.

stainless1.jpg

stainless2.jpg

poker118.jpg

poker318.jpg

poker418.jpg

Edited by Kreg

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Forged a petty out of my first weld ever. An 8 layer 1095/15n20 twist. This is fun! 

Also finishing another petty in W2 and bocotte with 416 bolster.

IMG_20180919_212204_1.jpg

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