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Joshua States

What did you do in your shop today?

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On 12/31/2018 at 1:11 PM, Jeremy Blohm said:

Man what a difference this makes. 

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This is a great picture showing how carbon steel sparks look.

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Posted (edited)

Finally happy with how my hamon's are coming out.

Got another one finished yesterday.....and quenched and did a quick test etch on this other blade.

It appears I have tons of activity.....cant wait to try and polish this one out.

 

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Edited by Kreg Whitehead
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On 12/31/2018 at 1:09 PM, Randy Griffin said:

 keep an eye on the bearings in the other wheels. They will be running around 7000 rpm.

I found an 8 inch drive wheel I'm thinking about ordering. It will bring me up to 7200 sfm. But the 2 inch idler wheels will be running 13800 rpm. Do I get the best bearings I can get or get bigger idlers. If I have to get bigger idler wheels I might not be able to make it work.

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12 minutes ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

I found an 8 inch drive wheel I'm thinking about ordering. It will bring me up to 7200 sfm. But the 2 inch idler wheels will be running 13800 rpm. Do I get the best bearings I can get or get bigger idlers. If I have to get bigger idler wheels I might not be able to make it work.

You're getting close to the max speed there. Depending on type, size and lubrication, 15-20,000 RPM is max on smaller bearings. Less on larger bearings.

Can you see the bearings well enough to get a part number off them?

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1 hour ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

I found an 8 inch drive wheel I'm thinking about ordering. It will bring me up to 7200 sfm. But the 2 inch idler wheels will be running 13800 rpm. Do I get the best bearings I can get or get bigger idlers. If I have to get bigger idler wheels I might not be able to make it work.

I think you may be getting near the point of diminishing returns on your gear. Not being snarky here just my usual dumb self, but I'd quit fiddling with it, get the best bearings you can and set them back and just start using the thing to make knives. When the bearings you have give out stop and put the new ones in. You can drive yourself nuts trying to optimize every thing. You've done a great job building up the grinder. Remember the old saying,

"If it ain't broke then fix it until it is.".

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I agree. If I want something to go that fast I'm going to buy a bader grinder. They are rated up to 9000 sfm. The tool shop I worked for has 2 of them in the back room and he is willing to part with one. I'm thinking about saving up and approaching him with a wad of cash....

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5 hours ago, Kreg Whitehead said:

Finally happy with how my hamon's are coming out

Nice one! You kept trying and it paid off nicely.

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So far, I got the scales cut to length and width, I still have to sand them.  I also got the holes drilled out in the wood as well.  Along with the brass pins cut to size.  I'm not sure if they are too small but I guess I'll find out when I go to fit everything up.  Still too early yet to start running the belt sander, I don't really want to do that until about 11.  But I plan on starting the inital removal of the baked on oil and cleaning up the blade as well this morning.  I'm hoping I can finish everything off today.  Id like to at least so I can mix up the epoxy tonight and get everything glued together.  At least that's the goal but I don't know if it will pan out.  I do plan on shaping the scales before I glue things together this time so I'm going to see how that goes.  I want more of a rounded handle this time since it will be a smaller handle.  So hopefully things work out.  I just hope my power doesn't go out tonight  GAH.

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Received the correct drive wheel for my second grinder today, spent the afternoon assembling the new grinder.

I used to swap between the wheel and the platten on the first grinder so there were compromises, also took the opportunity to optimize where the belts run on the drive and idler wheel.

Still need to build a stand for the second grinder and setup an enclosure for the VFD's

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My camera died right before Christmas, so I had to borrow one to get a shot of the finished candle holder.

Otherwise, not much going on.  Work is work, and all the production forging doesn't leave me with much energy to do things for fun.  :(

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That candle holder is freakin' cool man!

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Hey Vaughn, nice to see you over here, too! That candle holder is gorgeous!

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I forged out a drawknife from a piece of 1095.

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Nice!  How are you going to quench it?

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1 hour ago, Alan Longmire said:

Nice!  How are you going to quench it?

Carefully. :)

I hadn't really gotten that far in the thought process.  I'm either going to use a shallow pan and quench/temper the entire blade area but leave the handles to air cool, or I will treat it like most of my knives and quench/temper the whole piece and then draw back the tangs. What do you suggest?

Edited by Joshua States

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We had a long discussion about that at my local guild last spring.  Not that we ever did it (we were planning a class on making drawknives), but the general consensus was a tray with notches in the ends to fit the tangs for an edge quench, leaving the spine out of the oil. Another thought was to bend the tangs up backwards to be out of the way, then with some careful torch work, bend them back the right way after HT.  Still a third idea was to leave the tangs straight and do a vertical quench, then bend them.  Or even a spine-first quench with the tangs done, then draw the temper way back on them.  We were going to use 1084 or 5160 to add a safety margin for the time to get it from the forge to the quench.

After typing all that, it does seem the most straightforward way to do it with 1095 would be a spine-first quench, then draw the tangs way back.

Good luck with it!

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Might be of interest to some, Peter Ross has a video on forging the draw knife.  The welding and forging of the performance edge is quite clever.

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7 hours ago, Gerald Boggs said:

Might be of interest to some, Peter Ross has a video on forging the draw knife.  The welding and forging of the performance edge is quite clever.

Currently unavailable on Amazon unfortunately, but you can download it from Popular Woodworking for $24.99

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/product/blacksmithing-for-woodworkers-forge-a-drawknife-video-download/

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Torbjorn Ahman has a video forging one on U tube, and a lot of other good forging vids.....

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2 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Currently unavailable on Amazon unfortunately, but you can download it from Popular Woodworking for $24.99

That's too bad, I've got all of his videos, great stuff.  One of my favorite teachers.

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I scored around 50 pounds of dry black walnut already cut 2" thick. Some have nice figures. Those were cutoffs from some very expensive stairway. 

25$ ^_^

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I used up the last bit of coal I had and the last bit of steel time to get some coal and make a steel order lol.  Learning is expensive.  Oh well lol.

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I got my order of files from Production Tool today.  What a difference quality tools make over the Harbor Freight junk I had before.  Instead of taking hours to flatten out imperfections from the grinder using hard backed sandpaper, 10 minutes drawfiling with a 14" bastard and everything is flat and true.  Talk about a game changer!

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