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Joshua States

What did you do in your shop today?

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Spent a good 3 hours yesterday wrestling a 30 year old rubber truck tire off a nice metal rim.  Worth the effort.   So today I put it to use for my new anvil like object.   4 inch solid round axle of some sort as main base ,  welded on fork lift tine,  with my new wheel rim as a stabilizer base. Ignore the chain.   About 250 lbs total weight.   Got it set high, mostly gonna use it to help flatten and straighten long blades,  but also hope to use it for a main anvil for a treadle hammer of some sort.

anvil4.JPG

Found this guy at a swap meet a while back for like $30.   Dunno what steel but it has a real nice rebound and seems hard enough...   So I'm gonna mount it on my old anvil stump and see how it works.  4x4x10 "

anvil3.JPG

 

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Nice

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Got to working on that square block today,  cut out a square about 2 inches  deep in that old stump.  Don't know what kind of wood it is, maybe pine?  Didn't get a pic of the cut because when I went in to do a test fit the block slid right in and was a tight fit, so I just pounded it the rest of the way in.   It's in there solid now, not coming out easily. Looks like I totally scored on that block because it IS hardened.   Took me forever just to polish it up as much as you see, and that was with an angle grinder.   Has more center mass than my heavier real anvil and I think it will work out well.  If you look real close,  you can see how close I got my fit on the first try,  not bad for my rusty noob woodworking skills...

Anvil5.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nice job! Not get something hot and hit it hard!

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Not my shop, but I forged out half of the "hearth iron" (melted wire bloom) I made into a bar. Ran out of coal before I could work the other half down. Pretty exciting for me. It means that you don't have to be well practiced in sorcery to do this stuff after all. 

 After I get my low carbon all welded together and refined I feel confident enough to try for high carbon and attempt to pattern weld with it. 

20190220_171138.jpg

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I had a rather unpleasant experience yesterday.....a first for me.

I'm busy with 3 cleavers, forged from 5160, did the normalization and HT with a big hoo-haa on Wednesday afternoon/evening, soaked them in vinegar overnight and I was about 5 minutes into clean-up grinding when I spotted the cracks :angry:

Not shifting blame, but the blacksmith that helped me (alternating holding and striking) forge out the blades tends to hit cold steel at times.  The crack on the edge is circular, and on a photo it seems there's a weakness completing the circle.

The other two look fine so far.

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Ht'ed 3 blades yesterday. The twins on the left are gifts in 80CrV2. The right one is the second knife of a commission in W2 with hamon. Also did the final grind on the later, the hamon was already poping just with the x65 belt :rolleyes:

IMG_20190221_095213.jpg

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Ive got a quick question for you all, There someone about 20 minutes away form where i live selling a fully functional hand crank Champion forge blower 400 for 75$  

Ive seen these on ebay go for three times that, Im thinking thats a good deal but I just want to check with you guys first. 

Should I grab it?

The description says working Blacksmith forge. no cracks welds or damage,

Edited by Conner Michaux

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I would if I were you, 75 dollars is a good deal but make sure the thing works before you fork over 75 dollars that's a lot of money for someone who normally doesn't have that kind of cash.

Edited by AndrewB

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As long as it works, go for it!  I love my hand crank.

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I have one just like it. Mine makes at least one full revolution after you stop cranking it. If it stops fairly quickly i wouldn't buy it. 

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My son bought a one similar to that last summer. He paid 200 for it, but it included the actual forge as well. It didn't turn very well at the beginning, but he took the whole thing apart and cleaned out the dead spider and rust, oiled it up and now it spins 3-4 revolutions after you let it go. 

 

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You should take off the top cover and inspect the bronze gear.  Since it's much softer than the worm it mates with, and there is lots of sliding between the mating teeth, and the worm will wear first.  The first 400 I bought had severely worn teeth, and the worm was badly pitted.  The oiler cup was missing and the blower must have been left outside, and water got in and rusted the worm.  I figured I can use it for parts and only paid $20 for it.

 

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Oh snap! Dropped on concrete. 375°f was perhaps a bit low for W2. 425°f should give around 61hrc and will be safer. Better now than after the sale! 

IMG_20190223_115945.jpg

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Dont feel too bad about it! I know a guy that used to be a chef. Said every one of his his best Japanese blades was "tipped". He said he loved how long they stayed sharp though. I'm sure some of them where in hitachi white (Perty much W2).  I don't think he was impressed enough by me to let me regrind the spines a bit :lol:

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Yeah, i'll just grind around 3/16" off. I re-tempered the blade higher though, I don't want this happening I'm my customer's kitchen.

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Been working on this little hidden tang neck knife. Had a little piece leftover from an experimental billet. It's not San Mai as you can tell since it continues through the ricasso and tang. 

20190224_152536_crop_604x756.jpg

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@Cody Killgore

That's a Cool looking blade. What kind of steel is it made up of?

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@Cody Killgore That's a good looking combo right there. I'll have to remember that

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Interesting looking little blade howd you get the gray color in the edge of the spine like that?  Unless that's just the natural metal color.

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3 hours ago, Cody Killgore said:

It's CruForge V at the edge. 4140 at the spine with a piece of nickel in between

I really like that. The CruForge V really comes out dark doesn't it!

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Handle weekend mostly.

I was busy shaping one of the most unique handles I've made so far, when I noticed this small delamination....

The handle is rolled dark green wool and apple green cotton twill micarta, I struggled a bit drilling the hole for the tang, and turns out while shaping I ran into a void.

I've had several mistakes.....setbacks & disappointments recently, I solidly attribute that to the stress I'm under and my general mental state.

Knife making is my medicine, but the illness affects the medicine unfortunately.....

I hope I can fix this one, the handle is just too pretty to discard. 

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Posted (edited)

Had this project on the back burner for a while.  Finally got around to it.   Here is my new forging vise:  A little bit overkill...

NewVise3.JPG

Made from remnants of a forklift tine for one jaw, and a 2 inch square trailer axle  cut in two on the other side.  1 inch bolt for the pivot.  1.25 inch acme threaded rod.  Old hitch ball for the end of the screw.   All stuff I had laying around.   The Vise is Loosely based on the Snediker Post Vise.   https://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/a2/60/8b/fa6ce135662175/US699585-drawings-page-1.png       

As always, I veered off spec.  

Built this to replace my old Wilton, which is set too high for forge work, and I always felt bad hitting it with a sledge.

OldVise.JPG

 

Here is is holding whats left of the fork lift tine.   This stuff usually 4140 or similar ?  Any creative idea's on what to do with this last piece ?

NewVise2.JPG

 

And finally, here is the new vise holding a 3.5 inch x 18 inch solid round.  That will be the hammer head for my treadle project.  Weighs about 50 lbs.   

NewVise1.JPG

Hoping it will work out well once I get it anchored to the floor.

Edited by Bruno
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