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Joshua States

What did you do in your shop today?

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Did a little horse trading- and now My shop-monster has her own anvil... a little 35 pounder Cliff Carroll  to go with my new TFS 

 

-Now to get a stand built and her rocking the iron!

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Start'em young.  Cute!!!

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1 hour ago, Joël Mercier said:

Thank you gentlemen! 

 

I'm starting to get good at filing a nice and tight tang hole in the bolster. Now it's squeezed between the handle and the shoulders and the tang has been notched and drilled as a mechanical glue hold. I would normally use a pin but it's definitely not necessary imo...

 Joël, C'est magnifique!

Yeah cocobolo can be very diverse in coloration and grain. I have a block of 8/4 that I cut pieces off every once in a while. The colors change over time.

It's funny how that looks like it has this white line running down the belly and stopping just before the bird head.

 

 

Great idea @Kerri Duncan.

Edited by Joshua States

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Rewelded my riding lawn mower frame, replaced the drive belt...now I can catch up on my mowing; 3 weeks behind due to dodging a cyclone and being in a monsoonal trough for too long. Also made a machigane (little triangular bit of copper for bottom of habaki) and brazed up and fitted the habaki to the Japanese swrd restoration project i got from Geoff. Will post photos to the other thread later.

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Had a hour or two in my "cave" replaced a couple of rollers on the belt grinder, manufactured a new tensioner and made a tracking adjuster that actually works.! , the belt now runs true and no noise from the worn out bearing, peace at last, I can now hear the radio while I'm grinding and I bet my neighbours appreciate it too :D:D

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I spent about 4 hours sanding one side of a knife blade from 36 grit to 120 grit...............in one step!!!!!  At least the steps from here up to 600 are proportional!

 

Finally, after at least 9 months of searching, I bought a Lincoln 225amp welder...............in GREAT condition.  Rubber looked brand new and was plenty pliable.  Seller said the unit was around 35 years old but he seldom used it.  I believe it.  It's the old heavy copper coiled one.  Now I've got a lot of little projects in the shop I won't have to go "begging" to get done. 

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Nice Kerri! I wish I could get one of my lil' nephews into bladesmithing. 

 

@Chris Christenberry you wont be disappointed! I had an ancient one that belonged to my grandfather. My uncle decided he needed it more after he passed. I had stuff to weld, so I went to lowes and got a model that looks identical. Great little welders; those tombstones are! 

 

I figured out that the gain and drive on my amp for the gee-tor will only work if you push a button that makes a terrible noise when you push it and once its on the gain acts as a master volume and the drive starts to squeal all on it's own once it gets past 3. So I've got the gain on 8, drive on 3, and I use the knob on the guitar as a master volume.

 

I took it apart, and quickly realized I'm out of my league and hooked everything back up. Anyone got any idea as to what's wrong with it?

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On 1/21/2020 at 9:52 PM, Zeb Camper said:

 

I got strings on this thing! Still needs lots of work, but I got to hear its voice at least. I'm getting used to not having fret markers and getting used to the fat and wide neck. Managed to play just a short while before it was out of tune. I think the nut needs polished up or cut to a bigger size. 

 

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I really like the look of your guitar Zeb. I look forward to seeing it finished.

 

Here's something you'll find interesting if you haven;t already seen it:

 

 

 

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20200129_142219.jpgThanks, Don! I'll check that out later! Here's how it looks now. Still got some stuff to do to it but its coming along. 

Sorry, that picture was huge! 

 

Edited by Zeb Camper

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I believe the technical term for what I did in my shop yesterday is "faffing around" :ph34r:

 

@Kerri Duncan you have the most heart-melting cutest little princess I've seen in a while, how do you say no to that!?!?!?!? :D

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Geoff Keyes posted a picture the other day in the beginners section of a kukri that I have the identical twin of. So I dug it out of the box in the shop and decided to try and copy it. I'm doing mine with a through tang though. more forging will be done tomorrow while working on some hammers.

 

Started as a BIG 52100 bearing

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I got another presentation box finished and this one will go off to Illinois to my agent to show, along with some of my sample knives, round the various outlets he attends. I just have to get the Malon Labe symbol etched on the disc inlet into the knife handle and the grip set. While this box is lined in green, I have sample pieces to go in  red, maroon and royal blue but the green went best with the ebony of this knife/grip set.

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I decided to cut the burl today so with the 9 1/2 inch makita "skill" saw I cut in from each side and finished up with the hand saw to start the breaking down process.

There was a bit of to and froing from "skill saw to bench planer to bench saw to get it done but in the end I have it cut into managable pieces to continue the drying process.

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I put the moisture meter into the fresh cut side and found it is still very wet so will have to be at least another year till it is ready to break down further and then possibly another year to full dry before it can be used for knife handles.

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Boy, Gary, that's a beast.  I don't get to see burls like that around here.  Mighty pretty.

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I have a maple tree in my front yard that has a root burl about that size. For the last year I've been debating on cutting it off and see if the tree survives.:P

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Somebody correct me if I'm wrong......................but I've seen people remove a limb from a tree and coat it with something black that looks like tar to keep the tree alive.  You might check into that.  Just keep in mind it takes at least 1 year per inch of thickness for wood to dry.  Cutting that burl like Gary did will sure speed up the time it takes, but the exposed surfaces need to be coated with a product called Anchor Seal to keep the moisture from escaping too quickly and cracking it.  Takes a lot of patience to "wait"' for wood to dry.................especially when it's something like a burl you are dying to see in usable wood.

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9 minutes ago, Chris Christenberry said:

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong......................but I've seen people remove a limb from a tree and coat it with something black that looks like tar to keep the tree alive.  You might check into that.  Just keep in mind it takes at least 1 year per inch of thickness for wood to dry.  Cutting that burl like Gary did will sure speed up the time it takes, but the exposed surfaces need to be coated with a product called Anchor Seal to keep the moisture from escaping too quickly and cracking it.  Takes a lot of patience to "wait"' for wood to dry.................especially when it's something like a burl you are dying to see in usable wood.

That used to be the "thing" to do, but it is no longer recommended. I remember reading about it, but I don't remember the reason for the change...

 

Edit to add a link:

 

https://pruningcuts.com/what-do-you-put-on-a-tree-after-cutting-off-the-limb/

Edited by Ron Benson

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Finally bit the bullet and got in an order from NJSB.  Also refreshed my file inventory.  Tomorrow morning I'm going to refill the propane tank.  All in all it's going to be an expensive week, but I'm excited to get started on my first proper damascus billet tomorrow using the "right" steel. 

20200131_171135(0).jpg

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Anxious to watch the process, Alex.  I'll work along with you, vicariously!  ;)

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Watching another smith work a couple of weeks ago made me realize just how bad my forging skills really are.  I decided I needed some practice, and grabbed some 1095 just to get some hammer time in.  These aren't great, but they show a lot of improvement over what I usually do.

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I also needed to get the propane tank refilled.  My propane guy is used to me rolling up in my old Z3 roadster, but he got a chuckle out of the new car.

 

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After working out what I wanted as handle material for a few carbon blades I got 3 sets of bolsters shaped and pined on and then hardened seven  12c27 blades that are in the tempering oven for their 2 hour cycle.

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Seeing as how I just got done cleaning up all of the grinding dust in my shop, I decided to postpone any more forging until I could come up with some sort of dust collector to keep the shop a little cleaner in the future.  Using pieces and parts I had in my collection,  I came up with this:

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I'm not 100% comfortable that it not just a giant fire hazard, but if I like how it works I'll probably rebuild the whole thing out of steel.  I was only able to do a little bit of test grinding, but I'd guess it catches 80-90%.  Much better than just a bucket of water, which seemed to let 80-90% go all over the place.

Edited by Alex Middleton

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That's pretty neat Alex. I watched a guy clean metal dust with a magnet in a paper coffee cup. Just hold it over a bucket and take the magnet out and the dust just falls straight down.

That might work for any your collector misses.

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I built a similar filter that hangs from my shop ceiling 20 years ago.  In a wood working shop, atmospheric dust is prevalent everywhere.  I have a ceiling fan and a wall fan that keep the dust from settling (pretty much) and as long as it's in the air, my dust collector clears the air.  It's so effective that when I forget to open the flue on my wood stove and come back to a smoke filled shop, all I have to do is turn on the dust collector and it clears the entire shop in about an hour.  Of course, the next day I've got to clean the filters.  You'll love the filter.

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I got the handles on 3 knives and helped my apprentice ( middle aged woman artist) to put a handle on a table knife for herself then decided to lay out and do the preliminary profiling for another rifle stock. This one is for a friend who inherited his late fathers rifle that had  a euro stock that he does not like and does not fit him so asked me to make an early English styled stalking stock. I dont have his barrelled action so will work from one of my actions with his bolt (to get the bolt handle notch sweep right), bottom metal and a barrel tracing so he will have to do the final barrel channel fitting himself but it is no longer viable to send firearms (barrelled actions) internationally. I have his trigger as this is the part that the action layout is measured from. The face of the trigger the action screws and to the curve of the pistol grip, then the center of the trigger to the end of the butt pad to determine length of pull. Other measurements are able to be plotted on the stock from this information.

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