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What did you do in your shop today?


Joshua States
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4 minutes ago, Brian Dougherty said:

 

You should see the stock adjustments on my 10m air rifle!

 

Yeah, but can you replicate those in a fixed stock once you have it where it suits you?  :P And no dropped forends, that's cheating...;)

A customer of mine collects old safari rifles, and once let me play with some of the aforementioned English greats.  Just handle, no shooting.  Which, since one was a Holland & Holland double in .600 nitro express with a checkered steel buttplate, doesn't bother me!  I'll keep my shoulder, thanks. 

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56 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

 

Yeah, but can you replicate those in a fixed stock once you have it where it suits you?  :P And no dropped forends, that's cheating...;)

A customer of mine collects old safari rifles, and once let me play with some of the aforementioned English greats.  Just handle, no shooting.  Which, since one was a Holland & Holland double in .600 nitro express with a checkered steel buttplate, doesn't bother me!  I'll keep my shoulder, thanks. 

Both barrels in .600?  A lot of those had the big game bore and then something smaller.  (You know, like .470 NE :D)  Neat old rifles.

 

I understand stock making and in-letting very well, and grew up in my dad's woodworking shop, but even with a strong woodworking background, I don't think I would take on what Garry does.  It's very intimidating.

 

 

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-Brian

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5 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

The bespoke shops in London like Purdey, H&H, etc. used a "try stock" on which everything was adjustible. Length of pull, cast off (or cast on), drop, cheekpiece, and so on. The result is a true tailor-made fit.

You can find shops in the US that do the same. 

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7 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Garry, is there any cast off to that stock?  When I was doing flintlocks I liked to add a fat 1/4" of cast off to help line up the sights automatically when shouldered. 

For those who don't stock rifles, etc, cast off is offsetting the center of the buttplate away from the shooter. Think of having a pivot pin at the trigger that allows the butt to swivel. It makes the difference between just "nice" and a true custom fit to the shooter.  The bespoke shops in London like Purdey, H&H, etc. used a "try stock" on which everything was adjustible. Length of pull, cast off (or cast on), drop, cheekpiece, and so on. The result is a true tailor-made fit.

No cast Alan. I go through the full measurment list with a customer but this was his choice. 

 For myself I do an 3/16 of cast and add another 1/16 of cant with 2 degree of negative pitch This was the butt layout of the 6.5x57 I built for myself

Photo2908.jpg

 

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Von Gruff

http://www.vongruffknives.com/

The ability to do comes with doing.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Gerald Boggs said:

You can find shops in the US that do the same. 

I dont have a try stock Gerald as often my customers are a long way from here but I do go through an indepth discussion with them and in general when someone gets to the stage of wanting a custom stock made they know what they want or rathe know what they need to ake the stock work for them.

Von Gruff

http://www.vongruffknives.com/

The ability to do comes with doing.

 

 

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Well, I'm kind of embarrassed to mention what I did in the shop today after all that, Garry!!!!!

 

I welded a "hammering pad" on the top blade of my fullering jig, so now it's finished and ready to put to work.  Off and on today I kept applying moisture to the KOL30 repair job on the ceiling of my forge.  Then made a wall rack to hang my 2x72 belts.  I received an order of 8 different belts today and used them to decide how far apart to make the hanging pegs and what size PVC pipe to put on the stubs to keep from damaging the belts.   I'm going to put the rack high up on my 12' wall because floor and wall space is so precious in my shop.  I'll get the belts down with a shepherd's crook.  Finished up profiling 7 blades for my little wood carving knives.  Also took the connector box apart on my 2hp, 3-PH motor to wire it up like Jose recommends.  Turns out it was already wired the way he instructed.    ef51fd136b9e359549ceef3673b0dc31.jpg   Now all I'll have to do is to connect it to the VR and the VR to the 220V outlet.

 

I don't want to bother Jose.............I want him to keep his nose to the grindstone making those belt grinders.  But does anyone have any idea typically how long it takes him to deliver a grinder after it being ordered.  I think I read somewhere it was 4 to 6 weeks.................was that correct?

 

 

Edited by Chris Christenberry
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Chris

 

www.chrischristenberry.com

WHEW!!!  If I could only know now what I "thought" I knew back then....................

 

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I decided I wanted my forging area cemented so I can make proper anvil stands that sit flat on the ground instead of under rocks on the dirt. So me and my dad have been digging out a small area roughly 15x10ft to pour cement onto. Little did I know how long it would take to clear out all the rocks/gravel. This is Saturday’s progress 

391222C5-E079-415D-9911-472CB012FC93.jpeg

And this is today’s progress 5FD6ABA0-64CB-42D4-B70A-E5574CF1CDED.jpeg

Edited by Conner Michaux
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You know, I actually think you'll want gravel... I think its standard procedure to pour on top of tamped gravel isnt it? I would look into that. 

 

Edit: I stand corrected. Looks like that's something only some people do.... 

 

Good luck! 

Edited by Zeb Camper
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15 hours ago, billyO said:

Those look gorgeous...The mohair turned out better than I thought is would.

Thanks Billy, it does look good but I think the texture is its best feature.

I would think a bit of grip there would be good, but I've seen the opposite opinion from people who are more experienced....not massively grippy but you can feel it.....

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10 hours ago, Chris Christenberry said:

I'll get the belts down with a shepherd's crook.


Okay but you’ll be missing the perfect opportunity to make a remote controlled belt-rack lowering device (possibly for a garage door opener) :)

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"The way we win matters" (Ender Wiggins) Orson Scott Card

 

Nos, qui libertate donati sumus, nes cimus quid constet.

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On 4/20/2020 at 4:32 PM, Chris Christenberry said:

I'm going to put the rack high up on my 12' wall because floor and wall space is so precious in my shop. 

I made a circular belt rack and hung it from the ceiling over the bench that my grinder sits on. You can see a couple of photos on page 35 of this thread.

On second thought, I'll just post a couple here as well.

 

 

Belt Rack 1.jpg

Belt Rack 2.jpg

Belt rack 3.jpg

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“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

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On 4/20/2020 at 6:36 PM, Zeb Camper said:

You know, I actually think you'll want gravel... I think its standard procedure to pour on top of tamped gravel isnt it? I would look into that. 

 

Edit: I stand corrected. Looks like that's something only some people do.... 

 

Good luck! 

It really depends on how stable and firm the subgrade is. Soft ground will compress over time and lead to cracked concrete a  lot faster than concrete poured over what we call "ABC" which is three sizes of gravel mixed. The benefit of using the gravel is the seepage of cement into the gravel and boding it ever so slightly enough to create a very firm base.

From the photos @Conner Michaux posted, it looks like he has plenty of gravel handy, laying around the yard...….just sayin'.

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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Like that rack, Josh.  Too complicated for my welding skills.  But I bet having all your belts right there at hand comes in real handy.

Chris

 

www.chrischristenberry.com

WHEW!!!  If I could only know now what I "thought" I knew back then....................

 

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On 4/20/2020 at 3:04 PM, Garry Keown said:

I dont have a try stock Gerald as often my customers are a long way from here but I do go through an indepth discussion with them and in general when someone gets to the stage of wanting a custom stock made they know what they want or rathe know what they need to ake the stock work for them.

It's all new to me, I've never even seen one.  But I'm shifting my focus over to shotgun and found there's a whole world of stuff that rifle guys don't do. 

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32 minutes ago, Gerald Boggs said:

It's all new to me, I've never even seen one.  But I'm shifting my focus over to shotgun and found there's a whole world of stuff that rifle guys don't do. 

Yes that is a whole nuther world as far as "FIT: is concerned. It was what started the rifle fitting in England and led to the rise of the quality custom rifle stock.

Von Gruff

http://www.vongruffknives.com/

The ability to do comes with doing.

 

 

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Just finished this second ever forged oner.  5 1/2 x 1 3/16 1095 with stainless and gabon ebony furniture

I do like the forging process but this is proving to me why I need to build a helm hammer. Will get to the steel yard next week when we are able to move about again as our restriction ease down a level

 

IMG_20200423_143751.jpg

 

IMG_20200423_143522.jpg

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Von Gruff

http://www.vongruffknives.com/

The ability to do comes with doing.

 

 

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Nice forged blade there @Garry Keown

@Gerald Boggs how big are those Mjolnir? Are they like neck pendants?

 

As a side note, I was gifted these by a friend and coworker the other day. Spike crowns are the perfect size for knife handles.

 

Antlers V2.jpg

Edited by Joshua States
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“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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On 4/22/2020 at 6:03 AM, Chris Christenberry said:

Like that rack, Josh.  Too complicated for my welding skills. 

BTW, this is all held together by small tack welds. The only substantial weld in the whole thing is the one that holds the circle closed.

Even that is bolstered by the tubes being tacked across the seam.

Edited by Joshua States
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“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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Well, it's a good looking rack.  If mine turns out to be inefficient, I might give your idea a try.  Thanks.

Chris

 

www.chrischristenberry.com

WHEW!!!  If I could only know now what I "thought" I knew back then....................

 

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1 hour ago, Joshua States said:

how big are those Mjolnir? Are they like neck pendants?

These are about 1 1/4" wide.  I try to come out the same each time, but as it's all eyeball, I seldom do :-)  Yep, pendants. 

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I discovered I nailed the the HT on a folder blade I'm working on.  It's a large and substantial knife, fully assembled at this point (pics after it's fully complete), and while I was doing some filing on the rear bolsters about half an hour ago it popped out of the vise and bounced off the concrete floor point-first, as knives always seem to do when you drop them. :blink:

 

Chipped the concrete.  Did not bend, chip, or even scratch the blade.  B)

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