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What did you do in your shop today?


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15 hours ago, Russ Evans said:

Now comes the scary dressing the edges of the anvil. It’s a bit daunting to take an angle grinder to this. 

 

Unless there is something so sharp you think it's going to chip (and it doesn't look like it from the photo) leave the edges alone until you have used it for a while.  Maybe at most do a couple strokes with a good file to "Break" any edge that is truly sharp.

 

You can always come back and dress the edges a bit more as you decide you need to, but you can't put the metal back on.  That anvil will last a couple hundred years or more.  No sense in rushing in on changing its shape.

 

 

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Finished another folder.  Little bitty bugger, 2.5" / 63mm closed, 4.5" / 112mm open.  O-1, brass liners, nickel silver bolsters and pins, ebony scales.  Still needs an edge and some cleanup, but it's

Best I can do for today! Needs more grind work, sanding, and heat treatment. I just couldn't resist getting an etch on it before shutting the shop up.     

I've been working on a second slip-joint, and decided to try a bit of filework on the spring Here is the blade for it...

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

No sense in rushing in on changing its shape.

I'll add/emphasize only:  Unless there are any truly sharp, 90 degree corners.  IMO, each corner (that might be used for forging) needs at least a 1/16" radius or else you're run a risk of forging in a cold-shut.  

It's a lot easier to turn a radius-ed corner into a sharp one (through forging or filing) than to turn a sharp corner into one with a radius.

Edited by billyO
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If I were you, I would ask @Gerald Boggs how to best do the corners. I have a feeling he has forgotten how many anvils he has dressed, but that's just a guess.

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Posted (edited)

The edges felt a bit sharp from running my finger over them. I used a fairly worn 80 grit flap disk and only smoothed the sharp edge on the sides. I can feel the difference but it is hard to see any changes. I agree that you can't put metal back so I was very cautious.

 

I will forge on it some today!!

Edited by Russ Evans
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30 minutes ago, Joshua States said:

If I were you, I would ask @Gerald Boggs how to best do the corners. I have a feeling he has forgotten how many anvils he has dressed, but that's just a guess.

I haven't dressed that many anvils :-), but I have dressed a few.  Russ, You didn't ask, but before you dress the anvil, ask yourself "What am I using it for"  I do a wide range of forging, so I start with 3/8-1/2 inch curve on the left and work back to a sharp edge on the right.  I do that on both far and near side.  I had the advantage of working in a shop as I learned the basics and that's how most of our anvils were dressed.  I would agree with just taking a little off at a time and see what feel right.  I would have suggested using a flapper disc if you weren't already.  

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and Went into the shop today fully intending to finish of the grinding of the damascus blade I'm making for a friend's sons birthday present, having just replaced a wind damaged fence the shop was in a state, tools all over the bench etc so I Cleaned them away and found a length of 1/4 inch thick 1075, when I picked it up it kinda spoke to me and I knew exactly what I was going to be doing with it, I've got the shape roughed out and the 4 bevels are 75% of the way there, I only stopped because the grinder motor started to get hot so I cut out some (black?) walnut for the scales and cut the guard from mild, 

 Never did get round even looking at the intended project, hey there's always tomorrow, or the next day, or the next. :rolleyes:

IMG_20200513_145754.jpg

IMG_20200513_145720.jpg

IMG_20200513_145701.jpg

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Martin, is the ridge in that blade not centered or is that a "lens distortion"?

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At the time I took the photos it wasn't level, when the grinder finally cooled down enough to continue I did get the bevels equal 

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Okay.  Good to know my eye isn't "off"!  :D

 

Okay, no for my day in the shop.  My 2x72 belt grinder is due to arrive tomorrow and even though I don't have a bench for it yet, I still needed to install a 220v outlet where I'm planning on using the grinder.   So I spent much of my day going out and around to buy supplies and install the line and outlet.  So that step is behind me.  Can't start building the bench until I have the grinder from which to take dimensions.  I plan on making the table top tilt 90 degrees to the left so the belt can be placed in a horizontal position.   I'm a little gun-shy about deciding on the height to make the bench, though.  I think there was a thread about it mentioning the majority of folks found the middle of the platen at level of the belly button made for a good reference............is that correct?

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I like mine so that the tooling arm is about an inch above the belly button, but then I'm blind and need it close.  But somewhere around your center of mass is good, because you'll be locking your elbows and leaning into it.

 

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Kind of what I thought.   I'll aim for that height with some sort of mock-up before committing to the bench construction.  Thanks, Alan.

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IMG_20200514_165413.jpg I got the first of the steels finished that will be offered with all my knives from now on. Most are 6 inches overall but will do the odd one at 5 1/2 inches for some of the shorter knives like the mini skinner.

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6 hours ago, Garry Keown said:

 I got the first of the steels finished that will be offered with all my knives from now on. 

Interesting idea.  I never thought about making a knife steel.  How hard do you make them?  I know the idea is to gently realign the edge, and not to remove material.  I assume it should still be near the hardness of the blade?

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Got this blade tempered, final ground and etched yesterday. It's a crushed W's billet that I laddered and then drew out widthwise. My friends and family have requested that I dub the pattern "Reaper Damascus". Materials are 1080 and 15N20; I'll be putting black paper micarta scales on the handle today.

20200512_144329.jpg

 

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4 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

Interesting idea.  I never thought about making a knife steel.  How hard do you make them?  I know the idea is to gently realign the edge, and not to remove material.  I assume it should still be near the hardness of the blade?

I tempered them to 425f and for me the main purpose of the steel is to clean the edge of the blade of the meat fiber/membrane that make the edge feel dull. Even a strop down your pant leg will bring back an edge to clean sharp and a blade that has been dulled by the hair or dirt in the hide is  going to need more than a steel to bring it back. If a blade edge is soft enough to need realigning then it really is too soft to use as a working knife in my opinion. A blade in the 60 R range is not going to be altered by wiping it down a short steel like this. A number of the commercial steels have roughened surfaces or a series of grooves running lengthwise but the I have ground a few of them dead smooth and they work so much better that way for good knives. 

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Posted (edited)
On 5/6/2020 at 7:43 AM, billyO said:

Yesterday was hand sanding:)....more hand sanding:mellow:....and more:(.....and.... etching:D!

Ready for handles.

Handle finished for the top one:20200514_160975a.jpg20200514_112101_012.jpg

 

 

Edited by billyO
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I spent 15 minutes looking for a 3/4" long 1/16" pin I dropped before I just made another one that I also dropped and spent 15 minutes looking for before I found it. Then I left the chuck key in my mill/drill, turned it on and it shot away into the twilight zone. After a half hour of looking, I just cleaned up and went inside.

On 5/14/2020 at 7:31 AM, Jacob Cashion said:

It's a crushed W's billet that I laddered and then drew out widthwise.

I love those patterns. It always looks like goblin faces to me.

 

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"Then I left the chuck key in my mill/drill, turned it on and it shot away into the twilight zone. After a half hour of looking, I just cleaned up and went inside"

 

Joshua I found a great solution for that. You know those little reels that people put key cards on so they can pull them out and let them snap back? I attached one to my drill press and attached my chuck key to the end. I just pull the key down, use it and let go. The reel pulls it out of the chuck and out of the way.

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Priorities....
My non-functional burners, after purchasing some plumbing, now costs more than my first forge, all in.
Spent the best part of Saturday morning trying to tune some life into one of the burners, gave up and started prepping 2 big chucks of 52100 for a project.

Winter is here so it was good sweating over the anvil a bit, but all my efforts left me with two questions:

-How do I fix those burners?

-Do I trust the piece of 52100 that jumped out of the tongs right into a bucket of water? :wacko:

Turned off the forge, took a shower, and for the next seven days life is about 3 days of camping and fishing at Torra Bay in the magical Skeleton Coast park.

Spent many childhood holidays at the coast, but I've never been to the two camps in the park.

Hoping to get rid of the corona-coma and catch some serious fish, a.k.a fush B)
:D 

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I worked on this thing today trying to get the museum fit set up, some detail shaping of the spacer package and getting rid of a gap between the spacer and guard. I'm going to try some carving for the first time on the guard and handle. I recently attended a class by Larry Fuegen he made it look easy it's not ,but what a great experience.

kH4Iw9Gl.jpg

 

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Well had some time to work on the Bowie today. First I layed out the leaf pattern for the handle,then did some final profiling on the guard. Then I started carving the guard here it is.

6sZZqgMl.jpg

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