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What did you do in your shop today?


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On 12/13/2020 at 11:03 AM, Gerald Boggs said:

Just a heads up, beware how much power you give it.  I know two shops that have build/bought presses with I-beams and both have quickly bent.  Both times, the I-beams were pretty massive and yet bend they did.

Thank you for the heads up. I'm only going to be running a 3 hp motor so fingers crossed should come out to under 24 ton. I'll be keeping a close eye on it.

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A few weeks ago a kid (I say kid, college senior doing an honors thesis, probably 21 or so ) came to my local guild meeting to ask if anyone could help him with a sword. His honors thesis involves han

Forging a copper rose pommel for a misericorde I'm working on. Also going to try and make a couple of tiny ones for the ends of the quillions...    

Finished another folder.  Little bitty bugger, 2.5" / 63mm closed, 4.5" / 112mm open.  O-1, brass liners, nickel silver bolsters and pins, ebony scales.  Still needs an edge and some cleanup, but it's

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Worked on setting up the press got it into location a little sketchy. Now as I assemble I can order hoses, buy all the electrical and build a foot pedal (mostly built already) and figure out the rest maybe something to catch scale, hose protection....

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23 hours ago, Gilbert McCann said:

Thank you for the heads up. I'm only going to be running a 3 hp motor so fingers crossed should come out to under 24 ton. I'll be keeping a close eye on it.

I haven't been on the forum lately, so sorry for the late comments.  It's not so much the horsepower of the motor your using, but the force output of your hydraulic cylinder, which is just the max. pressure output of your pump multiplied by the cylinder area.  The fact that you only have structure on one side of the cylinder means the force will be putting large bending moments into the I-beam.  Just something to look out for.

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Thank you @Rich Bostiga I plan on starting with my control valves factory relief setting of 1500 psi which should put me at 15 tons with my combination. I'm also using a pressure gauge to help monitor and use for adjusting. I'll definitely be paying close attention. 

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I got sick of looking around for my files, so I threw this together for a quick fix.  Mounted right below my Shelf of Shame to force me to look at it every time I reach for a new file.  It helps me to remember to slow down and be patient. 

 

 

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Caught up on the handsanding and sorting the variuous handle components for this lot today;

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This morning, as a Christmas present to myself, I booked a couple of 1-day classes with a MS that lives about an hour away from me.  I'm looking forward to finding out first hand just exactly how much I don't know! :D

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Alex, that's a great present. You must have been a good boy this year.

 

For Christmas, I've given myself a one-day hammer workshop in conjunction with next year's Texas Blacksmith's Conference happening in my county (Fayette). Now, I've not been that good a boy this year, but, hey, I have a little shop money, so.......

 

Looking forward to showing some great work here in the new year.

 

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A left handed "D" handle on the chinese vegetable knife with black lacewood over brass on the L6 HC blade and a Serbian chef knife with stabilised willow on the 1084 blade.
I learned a lesson with the serb knife in that a wide blade like this is a real chalenge to snad after hardening so in future I will do a pre HT hand sand and do an antio scale coating to make things less difficult and time consuming

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I've been tracking my time spent on the last few knives that I've made.  I spend more time, hands down, setting primary bevels and keeping them even and straight.  In an effort to speed that process, and not wanting to spring for a disc sander right now, I finally broke down and built myself a prototype of a bevel grinding jig.

 

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So far I'm liking it a lot.  I just got done grinding a fillet knife and only had to spend 5-10 minutes per side handsanding with 120 grit to clean them up.  By far a personal best.  This one will work well for now, eventually I'll rebuild it out of aluminum to shave some weight off of it.

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Have had this eucalyptus crown top under cover and off the ground since I got it in march but the log it came from had been down for over a year before that. Today was the day to get it broken down into handlable pieces.  The central join between tyhe three limbs was what I really wanted but the forks outside of that should have some interesting pieces in them as well.

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First of the batch of handles in the handle rack and ready for the finish but will get the rest up to this stage before starting that process.

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Today I took off of work and spent some time getting a crown replaced.....

After that, I did some embellishment on a new frame handle I'm working on.

Final clean up and blackening the bottoms of the cuts still to come.

 

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Not in the shop today but I figure you all would be interested in this. 
 

This is what we learned at my school today 

 

This buck was fresh roadkill from yesterday night and my teachers took it as an opportunity to demonstrate how to process the animal. Unfortunately the organs ruptured and a good portion of the meat is spoiled. But everything unspoiled will be harvested and used. 
 

We will be learning how to tan the hide for the leather shop. And then process the head of this buck into a European mount for the blacksmith shop 

 

The coolest thing is that so many of the really young kids were interested in learning how to do this and they weren’t afraid to hold the heart and lungs. 

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19 hours ago, Conner Michaux said:

This is what we learned at my school today

You have one cool school.

On a not so cool note, I added to my collection of horrible reminders today.

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Ouch!  I'm gaining a sizeable pile of "learning experiences" in my folder-making box, myself.  Every time I start a new one I pull them out and look at them to remind me not to do "that" again, whatever "that" was.  Usually a grinding issue, but on the most embarrassing one, a saw cut in the wrong place because the paper template had blurred the lines.  :rolleyes:

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5 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

paper template had blurred the lines.  :rolleyes:

Make the templates from 1/8" flat bar. Make the spring templates from spring tempered  HC steel. That way you can assemble the templates and know they will work.

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Well, I am a fundamentally lazy man. The most effort I will spend on anything, is figuring out the easiest way to do it.

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