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What did you do in your shop today?


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7 hours ago, Troels Saabye said:

Going to be in storage for the time till i can move..

Good luck!  Hopefully it's a short transition and the landing is ideal.

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Finished another folder.  Little bitty bugger, 2.5" / 63mm closed, 4.5" / 112mm open.  O-1, brass liners, nickel silver bolsters and pins, ebony scales.  Still needs an edge and some cleanup, but it's

Yesterday, and not my shop.

Finally got my bench cleared off and back on some knives. This one was fun, but glad to see it done.   My oldest grandson turned six this weekend and I promised to make him a box for his tre

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I hope so BillyO, hopefully i can get the shop setup fast... but sadly it is more likely 2 years :'( got a heck of a job at hand with renovating/redecorating the house when te current tenants move -.- I hate being dependent, but this time no more ! moving to a location where i can roam freely :P only limited by myself..

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I decided on some forge welding practice. I've only done it once before at all, so I need quite a bit of that still :)

 

The first one I made was just three pieces of 1/8 thick 1075. I didn't really get it hot enough at first, so it didn't weld very well, but I got it to the point it was knife shaped so I decided that some grinding and sanding practice wouldn't hurt.

 

knife1.jpg

 

I think it's going reasonably well, ignoring all the spots where there are "not quite welds" - but it's just practice...

knife.jpg

 

Then I took three more pieces of the 1075 and looked around for something to layer with them. I found a piece of 1/8 inch thick O1 that I had set aside as "too thick for kitchen knives, too thin for anything else" and took it. I guess that's sort of go mai (sp?) - 5 layers... This was not a good idea: It made the most fantastic noises as it cooled...

 

crack.jpg

 

And split in the middle, showing a big oxidized area. Oof.

 

pieces.jpg

 

It didn't stay welded very well at all. So my third go at forge welding was a bit of a flop.

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10 hours ago, Ted Stocksdale said:

my third go at forge welding was a bit of a flop.

Are you using any flux?

 

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I wouldn't be surprised if the O-1 split down the middle.  That's not uncommon in a mix of steels with incompatible heat treatment requirements, or even compatible ones if quenched too fast.  I've done that with a 1095 edge clad with wrought iron.  Water quenched, the 1095 hardens immediately, the iron does not harden but does continue to shrink after the 1095 is no longer able to move.  Tink!  O-1 will air harden enough to be brittle, 1075 will not.  

 

Or it could just be a failed weld.  

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Yes, I was using flux: 20-mule-team borax. I think a combination of not enough and I needed to add more again since that layer certainly isn't good. I didn't realize it was that dramatic the first go around, so I probably made it worse in trying to fix it on the second go.  I'll use more next time!

 

I do think the biggest problem was what Alan said: the two steels just weren't a good pairing. I really wasn't thinking - I just grabbed thin shiny bar and went for it. But O1 is marketed for it's "outstanding dimensional stability during heat treatment" and 1075 really isn't.  Outside of that section a lot of it is welded very nicely which makes me happy, but I bet it will rip apart if I heat it up again or try to do anything with it.

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I gave up on trying to incorporate O1 into my damascus last year for this very reason. 

I wanted the darkness from the Mn, and was successful on my first 3-4 billets, then had 4-5 billets in a row split just like yours.  I went through a bunch of gymnastics trying to figure out what I was suddenly doing wrong to cause failing welds.  After changing my whole routine for forge welding, I landed on the probability of incompatible steels, and my troubles suddenly vanished. )

Edited by billyO
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Soooooooo.  Apparently burnt up t-shirt makes really good char cloth.  Takes a grinder spark really well if it's still laying on the shop floor where you left it after it caught fire last weekend.  Good thing I refilled the slack bucket.........:unsure::blink:

Edited by Alex Middleton
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Sorry Alex. Glad you’re okay. That did make me chuckle though. Kind of thing I could easily have done.

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Lol. No problem.  Thankfully nothing was damaged this time other than my ego ( a firefighter really should know better).  It's one of those potentially serious, but admittedly still funny, things that can happen.  It just reinforces the reasons for keeping the shop clean and following some basic safety rules.

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I added a second roller tube to the arm of the small wheel on the grinder so I can use it to clean up between the underside of the handle and the beard on the bearded knives. Has made a difference in the effort and time it takes to work on this area as unlike on a standard knife handle the closness of these two elements of the bearded knife makes it more difficult to work on.IMG_20210312_101714.jpgIMG_20210120_145917 (2).jpg

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Alex, I did the same today, i was repairing a weather vain that had been damaged in a storm, I didn't notice the rag on the floor that I had used for wiping over a blade with solvent, after a week the sparks from the welded found the remaining solvent in the rag,

Won't be doing that again in a hurry! 

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On 3/6/2021 at 4:14 PM, Alex Middleton said:

Always pay attention to what's on your bench when MIG welding, and never blindly walk away without at least looking around first.

[...]

I'm really glad i looked up from the forge when i did and noticed the smoke pouring from the shop.

 

22 hours ago, Alex Middleton said:

Soooooooo.  Apparently burnt up t-shirt makes really good char cloth.  Takes a grinder spark really well if it's still laying on the shop floor where you left it after it caught fire last weekend.  Good thing I refilled the slack bucket.........:unsure::blink:

 

 

I'm really glad you caught that in time, both times!!

 

You know what else makes for really good char cloth? Buffing wheels.

 

A small 3" wheel fell through a gap between the wall and the back of one of my work benches 2 weeks ago, right by the welding area. I finished my welding and went to pour myself a refreshing drink, and came back just in time to catch smoke pouring out the garage door by the fan.

 

It was surprisingly hard to figure out where it came from, I was starting to suspect it was inside the walls. My partner was on the phone with the fire department giving our address when I finally found the smoldering wheel.

 

Lesson learned. I've since done an audit of all the nooks and crannies in the shop where flammable material could hide, and completely reorganized around the welding and power hammer areas for maximum visibility: only bare floor or metal allowed, and mandatory minimum 5 minutes sticking around in the shop after I'm done with any kind of welding. In hindsight, I figure I must have been repeatedly lucky before :(

 

Stay safe!

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Glad you're all ok - fires where they don't belong are just scary.

 

I didn't get a lot of time to forge this weekend, but I managed two things. First, I returned to the O1/1075 to see just how bad it was.  I cut out a section that looked to be completely welded, but it is every bit as useless as I thought: trying to shape it a tiny bit then letting it cool caused even more splits and some fantastic buckling.

 

BlownApart.jpg

 

That is just not a combination to use :D

 

Second, I revisited my "three layers of 1075" with the last thee pieces of that 1/8 thick bar. Did my best to clean it up, welded it all the way around to see how that goes, and did my best to get it hot before hitting it. 

 

GoodWeld.jpg

 

And this time, at last, I am very happy with the result.  Once I ground past the MIG, you'd never know it hadn't started out as a 3/8 thick bar. 

 

Edited by Ted Stocksdale
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I'm very quickly falling behind on a knife that I had more than enough time for, had serious plans for this weekend, and Friday night after a walk he got sick......3am I was mopping up the contents of his bowels from the floor of my bachelor pad living room floor......didn't sleep a wink and managed to make two pieces of micarta for the whole of Saturday:(

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Finally got my bench cleared off and back on some knives. This one was fun, but glad to see it done.

 

My oldest grandson turned six this weekend and I promised to make him a box for his treasures, so I decided to make this one as "piratey" as possible.

 

I planed down a very old oak board from my grandfather's barn loft for the wood. I did an eleven piece top and then used a leather pad and 80 grit to make the top round.

 

I was about to buy some sheet brass when I remembered an old rectangular planter I used to quench in, but I managed to open a crack in it and threw it in my scrap bin. I cut it up and fabricated all of my hardware out of it:

 

brass.jpg

 

I made the handle rings from 3/16 rod and brazed the joint shut.

 

I decided to finish the wood in iron acetate (steel wool dissolved in white vinegar). It worried me that it looked kinda dull when it dried, but a couple coats of Danish Oil made it pop.

 

front1.jpg

 

back.jpg

 

open.jpg

 

Etched a copper name plate for it and called it done:

 

front2.jpg

 

We'll see how it holds up. These boys are tough on equipment.

 

Here's the man of the hour mid-celebration. Notice the careful placement of the Red Rider in case of bears and such.

 

boys.jpg

Edited by Don Abbott
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On 3/16/2021 at 10:33 AM, Don Abbott said:

My oldest grandson turned six this weekend and I promised to make him a box for his treasures, so I decided to make this one as "piratey" as possible.

 

That looks really cool, love it! I bet he did too! :)

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Spent the day working on my truck, downloading and cutting up some free 1" mild round stock i was given, cutting up an old vw beam for the spring steel for a special blade, starting to build a wood bow rack for my nieces bow & arrows. Installed new band saw blades, organized my steel and generally picked up.

 

Good day.

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Today I made a habaki. Then I made another habaki. Tomorrow I'm making another habaki. Apparently I'm not very good at making habakis right. Good thing is I'll have several practice habakis for engraving before I commit to doing it on the real one.

 

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My elbows were acting up, so I decided to pick up a project for my daughter that I'd been thinking of just doing by stock removal.  There's a lot I found that I would much rather have forged than cut/ground/filed... but hammer was just not a good idea this week.

 

1.jpg

 

Basically, a cool looking if somewhat impractical fantasy dagger. I took one of my 3/16 bars of O1, put layout on it, and drew the outline out.

2.jpg

 

I cut the rounds out with a carbide bit, angle-grindered where I could, and then used files to clean it up and cut in the bevels.  I thought I took a picture before heat-treating, but I can't find it. 4x normalization and quench and 3x two-hour temper at 400 all went smoothly

 

3.jpg

 

4.jpg

 

 

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Hello all.  I finally decided to spend the money on a TIG setup for prepping pattern welded billets without adding any outside metals, so I had to teach myself how to use it.  Here's a picture of 5 pieces of 15N20 ready to forge weld into a solid billet.  

20210320_161924.jpg

Does anyone know if heat oxidation colors that are most likely in all the layers like the outside will prevent the welding of the layers?

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I have wanted a disc sander for a while. I had one I made for the bowl lathe I built ~ 40 years ago, but I need to rebuild the lathe - storage in an unheated barn for 30+ years was not kind to it.  ;)

 

Yesterday I remembered that I had my dear departed Dad's Makita planer blade sharpener. It's missing the water tank that keeps the stone wet, so I'm hesitant to use it with steel as I'm afraid the stone will glaze over. However, by removing the stone and replacing it with a 9" particle board disc, (two layers), I can add a 9" PSA sanding disc and use it for flattening. And I still have the parts to convert it back to a sharpener.

20210320_122002[1].jpg

20210322_164122[1].jpg

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