Jump to content

What did you do in your shop today?


Recommended Posts

Went to a vintage Tractor show at the weekend, picked up a stunning wallnut plank just under 6ft and an inch thick  for just £30

 Had to cut off 2ft to make a new chopping board for the wife, she wanted the best bit of wood though. 

The whole plank had been pre oiled so I had to remove that before using a food safe oil on the chopping board 

IMG_20210823_191559256.jpg

IMG_20210823_191443523.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 4k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

A few weeks ago a kid (I say kid, college senior doing an honors thesis, probably 21 or so ) came to my local guild meeting to ask if anyone could help him with a sword. His honors thesis involves han

Finished another folder.  Little bitty bugger, 2.5" / 63mm closed, 4.5" / 112mm open.  O-1, brass liners, nickel silver bolsters and pins, ebony scales.  Still needs an edge and some cleanup, but it's

Forging a copper rose pommel for a misericorde I'm working on. Also going to try and make a couple of tiny ones for the ends of the quillions...    

Posted Images

This evening I picked up a boot dagger blank I had forged out a while ago. Started grinding the flats on it and the fresh 36 grit belt was having a hard time cutting. Finally got the ricasso on both sides flat and tried to scribe the center line only to have my carbide scribe skate over the surface. I then remembered the blank was from CruForgeV. I guess I didn’t normalize as well as I had thought :wacko:.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been playing with a light rescue knife as sugested with a nipple nose and got them done up to finish grind and stone wash last night. The flathead lever is just under 8 inches and I will do a para cord wrap on the handle. I made this one from a piece of leaf spring ground to a 1/4 inch thick but if there are orders I will make them from the 1/4 in 80CRV2 steel with the knife being from 1084 will have thin 1/4 inch micarta handles. May do them in combo sheath or seperate as preference dictates.

 

IMG_20210826_061845.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, yesterday anyway....I took the pieces parts from an accordion cut bar and arranged them for welding together.

 

6 Cutouts arranged.jpg

 

Cleaned them up and tacked them to each other

 

7 Ready to canoe.jpg

 

Built a canoe

 

8 Canoe.jpg

 

Filled the sides with 1095 powder

 

8 canoe filled.jpg

 

And welded the lid on the canoe

 

8 Canoe welded.jpg

 

Saturday is Liz's birthday, so maybe Sunday I can forge this up.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I madly dashed around buffing knives and jewelry, less than an hour before I had to leave for the local sheepherders rendezvous, where I am a vendor.

I glued the handle back on the edc and it survived three long falls unto the concrete floor. It made the handle a little shorter than I wanted it, but it passed inspection well enough to go on the table.

 

20210826_203933_HDR.jpg20210826_203810_HDR.jpg20210827_171955.jpg  

This is the first time I've ever had a table anywhere. It was fun for the first hour or so, but after three hours the novelty kinda wore off. Now I'm people watching, suddenly wondering if it's not normal to be facinated with all things sharp and shiny.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Faye said:

It was fun for the first hour or so, but after three hours the novelty kinda wore off.

Yeah. It's really tiring having to be nice to people......

 

3 hours ago, Faye said:

suddenly wondering if it's not normal to be facinated with all things sharp and shiny.

The trouble with "normal" is it always gets worse. Bruce Cockburn said that in a song.

People are a lot like crows really. They are easily drawn to shiny objects. Do not display the knives in the sheaths, Having the sheaths in a separate location on the table is the way to go. 

 

The pendants are cool. If you are going to keep making and selling them, make a tree to hang them from. It attracts more people when they see stuff hanging in display. Don't ask me why.

Good luck!

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Joshua States said:

It's really tiring having to be nice to people

Especially the guys who ask me where I buy my blades. 

Thank you for the advice, I will be sure to rearrange things a bit today.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Yeah. It's really tiring having to be nice to people......

 

45 minutes ago, Faye said:

Especially the guys who ask me where I buy my blades.

Isn't that the truth!  Part of the reason why I'm thinking about moving back to the Midwest and join another maker who really likes doing the market thing.  Maybe then I can just focus on making things and let someone else explain to the paying customer why my pattern welded stuff costs more than the $49.99 stuff you can find on the internet....

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Faye said:

Especially the guys who ask me where I buy my blades. 

Thank you for the advice, I will be sure to rearrange things a bit today.

 

Those guys are the worst! They ask me whose castings I use for my hawk heads. Half of them don't believe me when I say I don't use castings or off-the-shelf inlays. :rolleyes:  I should keep a rough-forged head around to show them...

 

Best of luck with your sales!

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Alan Longmire said:

 

Those guys are the worst! They ask me whose castings I use for my hawk heads. Half of them don't believe me when I say I don't use castings or off-the-shelf inlays. :rolleyes:  I should keep a rough-forged head around to show them...

That might be because using castings (made in China) is the default for most sellers at any show that isn't properly/strictly  juried.  Back when I still did shows, I did that with several of my products, works pretty good and is a nice conversation starter. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

When I did the Art show thing, I made a story board set of pieces showing the Damascus process. I also think this whole "where did you buy the..." is the primary reason Brut De Forge became popular with knife makers. The only trouble is, now the lay person thinks every forged knife or axe, or whatever, needs to have a portion of it rough or it isn't forged.......

Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of my knives are stock removal. It annoys me having to explain why it doesn't make any difference in quality and that even on my forged knives, most of the work is done post forging. 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool pattern Niels!

 

On my side, I am currently working on 3 knives. That's 2 more than my usual :lol:. The fillet blade is completed and the petty chef is nearly there. Also working on a copper bolster for a little blade @Zeb Camper sent me a while ago. I spend probably too much time on bolsters, but hey, I like that kind of precision work.

PXL_20210829_225552429~2.jpg

PXL_20210829_223545742.jpg

PXL_20210829_223603303.jpg

Edited by Joël Mercier
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Added a VFD to my grinder, which i am really looking forward to and organized my belt storage:

 

 

IMG_20210830_195054910.jpg

IMG_20210830_195101876.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Did a public demo for the Cades Cove Preservation Association this Saturday.

 

http://www.cadescovepreservation.com/

 

Negatives:

  • MAN! It was hot! Setting up and especially loading up at day's end had me soaking wet.
  • Light crowd. The folks that run the museum are great, but I think they struggle with publicity.
  • Worked my tail off to have plenty of flint&steel sets and heart pendants on display. Sold one flint&steel.

 

www1.jpg

 

Positives:

  • Sold one knife. Antler crown with poured pewter. Made me sad though that I didn't get a picture of it.
  • Got to see some folks I hadn't seen in years.
  • Met some new folks and had some great conversations about forge work and genealogy.
  • Gave away several of my cards.
  • Oh, and I got to share the space with my daughter and my 5 month old granddaughter. They sold a bunch of homemade soap and corn relish.  https://www.jandrfarmstn.com/

 

www2.jpg

 

www3.jpg

(sorry... obligatory Granddaddy picture)

 

So yeah, it was a good day.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Finished this one and got two more coming behind it. Experimenting in faster assembly.

GaryLT

B49DE0F4-8A2D-4710-9FE5-C363B869255B.jpeg

C33C252A-EEFE-4C2F-8425-72C05219A617.jpeg

96C70865-1149-4998-B79F-FF2134559D6E.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bladesmithing is temporarily paused while I work to afford it. So Into the realm of woodworking I go! first 2 of 5 cutting boards are almost done. all they need are juice grooves and finish sanding. 
Plenty more are on the way 

D4AA1B5B-9C78-479E-9DEE-07535F3C3F90.jpeg

Edited by Conner Michaux
  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm finally getting more efficient with folder blade grinding.  Today I managed to use the jig I talked about here:

 

and some new belts to produce the completely machine-finished to 400 grit blade shown here:

blade.jpg

 

in 15 minutes, including flipping it over on the jig and changing belts.  Not bragging, because let's face it, it's not great and still need a lot of hand finishing, BUT it used to take me about 1.5 hours to get to this point from a precision-ground blade blank.

 

I blame the jig for the even grind, and the belts for the speed.  And now I need your help:  A few months ago, like maybe around February, I was ordering some supplies and bought a new kind of belt recommended as good for stainless steels.  It's green, I think it is made by Sun abrasives, and the only marks on it are in the next pic:

belt.jpg

 

I usually get belts from Tru-Grit or Supergrit, but this might have been from USA Knifemaker.  I just don't know.  I got five of them, and they work as advertised.  They cut fast, run cool, and leave a great finish. Much faster on stainless than the Klingspor zirconiums I've been using.  Anyway, the blade above that took 15 minutes to grind used this belt, a 3M Trizact CF A45, then a Klingspor j-flex 400.  Maybe 1.5 minutes per side with the green mystery 120-grit belt, then one minute with the A45, then 45 seconds with the j-flex 400.  The rest of the 15 minutes was flipping the blade on the jig and changing/adjusting belts.  Any help ID-ing that green belt would be much appreciated.

 

Speaking of j-flex, did you know that USA Knifemaker had a custom run of j-weights made for them by Indasa Rynowet?  That's right, the same stuff that's widely agreed to be the best hand-finished paper is now in 2x72 belt form, only as a limited supply experiment to see if it's worth pursuing. https://usaknifemaker.com/shop-categories/rhynowet-jflex-2-x-72-belt.html

 

That's not a commercial, I haven't used them yet, I just found them while looking for the green R203 belts and thought y'all would be interested.  

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

I'm finally getting more efficient with folder blade grinding.  Today I managed to use the jig I talked about here:

 

and some new belts to produce the completely machine-finished to 400 grit blade shown here:

blade.jpg

belt.jpg

 

I usually get belts from Tru-Grit or Supergrit, but this might have been from USA Knifemaker.  I just don't know.  I got five of them, and they work as advertised.  They cut fast, run cool, and leave a great finish. Much faster on stainless than the Klingspor zirconiums I've been using.  Anyway, the blade above that took 15 minutes to grind used this belt, a 3M Trizact CF A45, then a Klingspor j-flex 400.  Maybe 1.5 minutes per side with the green mystery 120-grit belt, then one minute with the A45, then 45 seconds with the j-flex 400.  The rest of the 15 minutes was flipping the blade on the jig and changing/adjusting belts.  Any help ID-ing that green belt would be much appreciated. 

 


 

Could this be it?  https://www.preferredabrasives.com/prod-info/belt-mat-desc/

 

 

02E286F2-3A83-4468-98E9-AC126E9DF57D.png

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Eric Morgan said:

 

Ha!  The very one!  Thanks, Eric.  I need to get some in lower grits as well, I cannot emphasize enough how much I like them.  

 

Ceramics may hog better with a high-HP grinder, but my grinder is kind of wimpy and it loves these.  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I heat treated a big cleaver out of 15n20 that my brother in law has been bugging me for.  Biggest blade I've ever had in my forge by far.  Everything came out hard and straight which was a relief.

 

I also spent a couple of hours finishing up the hand sanding on this years KITH knife.  A while back I threw a light hearted jab at @Brian Doughertywhen he mentioned using his Optivisor during hand sanding.  Seeing that I respect his methods and work in general, I decided to give it a try.  I have to say that it really puts things in a different light.  It may not actually make a huge difference in the end, but it definitely feels like it does while you're doing it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...