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What did you do in your shop today?


Joshua States
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Unloaded 1000 lbs (454 Kg) of coal.  In 50lb bags.  I am sore.  But the shop will be warm this winter!  It was stove coal, not forge coal.  I have around 500 lbs of that, which will also last the winter at the rate I'm using the coal forge these days.

 

 

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Being that was only 20 bags, might be your body telling you that you're living too easy and you need some physical activity.  Try moving the bags from one side of the shop to the other every two days until the soreness is gone :-)

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I think I may have found a meteorite. I dont have a good magnet but I'm trying to find one. Anyone have any experience identifying meteorites?

 

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Can't help you identify it Jeremy, but I'm excited for you if it does turn out to be one.

 

I've been spending too much time on Marketplace lately (according to my wife anyway:D).  I picked up this little unit this morning for $400.

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She's completely manual, but for my needs itll work just fine.  A little TLC got everything up a turning properly.  Quick question for those with more experience with vintage equipment.  It has several oiling points at all the critical spots.  What weight oil is best to use for something like this?  I got everything freed up and running using WD40, but that's obviously not the proper solution for sustained use.

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3 hours ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

I think I may have found a meteorite. I dont have a good magnet but I'm trying to find one. Anyone have any experience identifying meteorites?

 

20211113_140148.jpg

20211113_140141.jpg

20211113_140236.jpg

20211113_140242.jpg

20211113_140247.jpg

20211113_140252.jpg

 

Based on size, if its a meteorite, you have probably just found your pension funds.

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30 minutes ago, Jaro Petrina said:

 

Based on size, if its a meteorite, you have probably just found your pension funds.

I was going to say that based on its size, if it was a metorite, it would have been at the bottom of a big hole.....

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“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

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12 hours ago, Alex Middleton said:

Can't help you identify it Jeremy, but I'm excited for you if it does turn out to be one.

 

I've been spending too much time on Marketplace lately (according to my wife anyway:D).  I picked up this little unit this morning for $400.

20211113_174436.jpg

She's completely manual, but for my needs itll work just fine.  A little TLC got everything up a turning properly.  Quick question for those with more experience with vintage equipment.  It has several oiling points at all the critical spots.  What weight oil is best to use for something like this?  I got everything freed up and running using WD40, but that's obviously not the proper solution for sustained use.

 

Nice!  A light oil is good.  They make stuff called "way oil" to use on lathes and such, but it only seems to come in 5-gallon buckets.  I use either Zoom Spout (brand name, made for electric motors) or 0w-20 synthetic motor oil for things like that.

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Ran into a small issue.  The motor will only run for a couple minutes before tripping the thermal protection.  I thought maybe the belt was too tight, or the drive shaft wasn't spinning freely enough, so I took the motor off and ran it by itself and had the same problem.   I'm thinking the motor is toast, but I'm not sure.  Thoughts?

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10 minutes ago, Alex Middleton said:

Ran into a small issue.  The motor will only run for a couple minutes before tripping the thermal protection.  I thought maybe the belt was too tight, or the drive shaft wasn't spinning freely enough, so I took the motor off and ran it by itself and had the same problem.   I'm thinking the motor is toast, but I'm not sure.  Thoughts?

Probably, its a three phase or ?  Can you measure each coil separatelly?

 

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Is the motor getting physically hot? 

I had a similar problem with my saw bench thermal switch kept cutting in, but the motor was cool, striped the motor brushes out and replaced one that was sticking and its been OK since! 

I'm no electrician so please don't take this as gospel, 

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https://www.hunker.com/13408521/how-to-test-a-thermal-overload-switch

 

 Try this seems quite straight forward 

Could be a faulty switch 

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3 hours ago, Alex Middleton said:

 

 

It may also be wired for high voltage. I have seen 220 plug-ins that look like a normal 110. It would just be a matter of checking the wires that come out of the motor into the pecker.  

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promptly Cracked the Tanto I was working on today.

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I'm still learning water-quenching and working with this steel though, so I knew there was a high chance it wouldn't survive.

Notes were taken and next time we'll give it another go!
P.S. the stone lines perpendicular to the edge is post quench, they were parallel before I cracked it:rolleyes:

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Glued up the handles of a paring knife and 2 mini cleavers, rough shaped the knife and one cleaver's handle.

I'm thankful I can work again so soon after shoulder surgery, but I'm tired down to my bones and utterly done with this year, so I'm not getting the fix that making something normally gives me.

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19 hours ago, Alex Middleton said:

Currently has a 110 cord on it.  I guess I should pull the cover off and check the wiring, not that I would really know if it was wrong.

When I bought my air compressor (Craigslist many years ago) it had mismatched wiring in the motor and plug.  Took me longer than I'd like to admit to figure that out.  Ended up switching the wiring, testing it, then switching the wiring back and switching the plug so it could stay running on 220.  

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After talking with some of the maintenance guys here at work, that's actually going to be the first thing I check.  They also gave me an amp meter to bring home to check the draw if everything is wired correctly. We'll see what happens after that and go from there.

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4 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

What steel did you use? 

 

Also, you should break it and watch(and show us) the grain. 


Its shear steel from an antique leaf spring, so it also has the benefit of being salvage steel, lol!

Broke the blade this morning:

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 Dear goodness, I must have forgot to normalize the thing!:blink:  Excellent feedback for notes though.

Edited by Jaron Martindale
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