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What did you do in your shop today?


Joshua States

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New charcoal has arrived. Fortunately professional cooks demand consistent quality charcoal of known wood types. That will give more certainty that if it's good, I'll have a reliable source for casting I can depend on. And it's not a lot more expensive fortunately.

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Jeroen Zuiderwijk

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/barbarianmetalworking

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Not that cold here yet, but yeah, it's possible for it to be too cold to be in the shop.  

 

I spent this afternoon with Matt Walker and Co. watching them forge titanium hammers from 2" square bars of Ti-6Al-4V, also known as Grade 5 Titanium.  Tough stuff.  Gentle drawing dies on the 60-ton press were required.

 

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It is also subject to surface tearing if forged below a near white heat.  We don't think it's a problem, and they're going to cut the peen at the tear anyway, but it was interesting to see.

 

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Very interesting stuff!

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Is there any benefit to making a titanium hammer? except for the coolness factor of course.

 

I used to forge titanium bottle openers and it was a real effort to stay within the working range, too cold be even a slight bit and it would just stop moving under the hammer.

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For me it's just the cool factor, because you can't beat physics.  That said, this grade of Ti has roughly a third again higher rebound than steel, and when used on small wrought or mild steel stock it really does feel like it's moving things with less effort, and much easier on the elbow.

 

On a tough steel like 6150 I personally don't find it as effective as a steel hammer, it just bounces off without leaving as deep a mark.  

 

But when you get down to it, how cool is it to have a ~1000 gram 6Al4V Titanium hammer?  Pretty darned cool, especially if you anodize it in shades of electric blue.  I won't know, these are all spoken for, but if I did have one I'd use it when I wanted a little flash. B)

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I made a hat! Two actually. They are reproductions of bronze age woolen hats from Guldhoj, Denmark, dating to around 1500-1300BC. It's been quite a search to find the correct fabric: natural brown wool, plain weave, single ply and this is even handwoven too. The hat consists of a tubular piece and a round piece sewn together, which together have to form a nice round hat, to which I discovered the trick yesterday (fulling to take all the wrinkels out). I used to have a whole set of bronze age clothing for living history, and I'm recreating that again. Not sure if and when I'll be doing bronze age living history again, but I just want to have the option.

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Jeroen Zuiderwijk

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/barbarianmetalworking

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It may be a bronze age cap, but you look like you stepped out of a 17th century painting!

 

Last week I forged and rough ground a tomahawk from some really gnarly 1830s wrought iron.  Kept trying to split on me, there's a flaw rolled down the length of the bar.  But it ought to have better grain than the newer wrought I've used for the last few hawks.

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Today was lathe day, once I got the shop up to a reasonable temperature. It was 9 degrees F / -13 C outside, 22F/-5C in the shop at 8:30 AM.  I fired up the two-burner propane heater and the Warm Morning #400A coal stove at full blast, and by 10 AM it was 58 F / 14 C, so I got to work.  By the end of the session at 4 PM it was 62 F / 17 C.  I reloaded the stove and locked it down for the night, ought to be enough embers in the morning to start a new fire without kindling.  

 

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What am I turning on the lathe?

 

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The bowl for that hawk head.  Same wrought, same flaw, thought it was going to tear out one side of the bowl.  The steel thingy is an adaptor I made for these things.  I thread the bowls 3/8-24, and it's hard to hold these things in the chuck after threading without squashing the thread, especially in wrought.  The adaptor is hollow, threaded 3/8-24 and necked down to 1/2" at the small end where the bowl threads in.  Very handy for getting into those little corners!

 

The bowl itself was turned freehand using the etch-a-sketch method of working both feed wheels at the same time with a 60-degree threading cutter, then cleaned up with files on the lathe followed by the belt grinder with 1/2" wide belts.  The adaptor provides a safe way to hold onto the thing.  

 

If tomorrow goes according to plan, it's filework day once the shop warms back up.  Predicted low tonight is 3 F / -16 C. Todays fire and the overnight load in the stove ought to keep it above freezing in the shop.

 

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Me too!  

 

Today I started the filework, making the transition between blade and eye.  Once that's filed in, the blade is drawfiled to re-level it.  I did both sides and added another element along the bottom edge after I took this shot.  

 

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Basically created a step at the line and filed bevels.  Then forgot to take a picture.  Been a while since I did serious filework with the big files, I'm out of shape! :rolleyes:

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That looks like a lot of drawfiling!

 

On my side, I've started hand sanding the 63hrc 12" blade. One side done at 320 grit. This is going to require a lot of patience...

Edited by Joël Mercier
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I managed to get this moved from rural Ohio back to the shop through the different snow storms. Cant wait to start rebuilding it even though it really only needs a drive and a tread spring plus safety shield, but I want my own confirmation on all the oil, grease and parts so I don't have any early surprises.

 

Getting paid to travel for work is fun until you want to do something at home.

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Started grinding on one of the titanium hammers. More resistant to grinding than steel and the sparks are bright enough to  require shaded lenses and it's stinky. I wore a paint respirator.  The piece on top is one of the biscuits from punching the eye, color is natural. 

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Matt Walker                https://www.youtube.com/@onedamascusmaker/videos

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3 hours ago, Eric Estlund said:

I might be preaching to the choir, but be careful with ti dust/ chips/ swarf. Can turn into a wicked fire.

Thanks Eric, Dirt floor shop, but I'll rake clean under the grinder. Those sparks are really hot. I'll get a photo when one of the other guys come to grind their hammer. The water jet place sent me a video of the cut and it was white sparks in the presence of water.

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Matt Walker                https://www.youtube.com/@onedamascusmaker/videos

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On 1/13/2024 at 5:18 AM, Bob Bryenton said:

What does any else do for ventilation when its this cold?

We move to a warmer climate. :rolleyes:

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“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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