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What did you do in your shop today?


Joshua States

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Finished this one in AEB-L core with wrought over. I like this steel AEB-L. Stag antler (Chital/Axis), very solid, good weight but not gnarly as other species. Kokemäki Style and a pain to burn in the tang which extends almost to the pommel end.

I like the simplicity..

The sheath (a first as such) is decorated, 2 serpents intertwined with random background dotting.

Comments are welcomed 

Gary LT

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"I Never Met A Knife I Didn't Like", (Will Rogers)

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I like it!  How was welding the wrought to the AEB-L?  Did you have to seal it around the edges?  And that antler could pass for walrus ivory.  

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Hey Alan, yes I did seal it first on all sides, although my welding isn’t great, it kept it sealed and workable. I did a plate quench slanting the plates to stay in contact with the AEB-L. Edge is hard as woodpecker lips, and holding!
The antler was a shed and has some fine lines, character, etc. I have a few more pieces to use. (Weather has gotten warmer!)

Thanks!

Gary LT

Edited by Gary LT

"I Never Met A Knife I Didn't Like", (Will Rogers)

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That antler is really pretty. The blade is looking great.

 

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

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Appreciated, thanks Joshua!

Gary LT

"I Never Met A Knife I Didn't Like", (Will Rogers)

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I liked the design of the scabbard, the deer antler handle was just the right size. Here in Brazil we use ox horns, but deer horns look much more elegant on the knife. Congratulations

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On 1/1/2022 at 9:21 PM, Gary LT said:

Have this one put together just need final sanding/polishing/touché mark. Dang, stout, heavy folder, suppose to be a pocket knife but it’ll pull your pants down!

GT

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The model was magnificent, I'm going to use this format to develop a piece for myself.
Congratulations, I really liked it.

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Thanks Don and Feltran..

I know Brazil leads the world in cattle production but I am sure deer are available as well or maybe more plentiful in other countries in SA.?

You’re most welcome to copy the folding knife. Keeps us posted.

Gary LT

 

"I Never Met A Knife I Didn't Like", (Will Rogers)

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16 minutes ago, Eric Estlund said:

Who's got two thumbs and sanded right through both (and a finger) plate sanding? 

 

Been there too often! :lol:

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Jack Repair....Not a knife but it is made of O1 ...... I needed to use the jack and of course a part fails just at the worse  time..... But we are smiths and can make our own repair parts....

jack repair.jpeg 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I was cutting some weird things on a scabbard today but it was getting frustrating with my lack of proper lighting insideIMG_20240208_160725.jpg

 

So I took a break and went out to the shop to create dust

 

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just roughing in one side has my back killing me so will take the other side one panel at a time.

 

If you ever get that passing idea that trying out a cinquedea might be fun ignore it :lol:

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10 hours ago, Bjorn Gylfason said:

If you ever get that passing idea that trying out a cinquedea might be fun ignore it :lol:

 

I really look forward to seeing that when it's done. Reproductions of cinquedeas are basically nonexistent.

 

A cinquedea has been on my "to-make" list for a long, long time. What makes me keep putting it off was when I did a CAD model of one and realized that to do those fullers that tapered only on one side (the side touching the bevel) and still touched the other fullers on a crisp ridge with no flats in between them, they had to be at an angle relative to the centerline of the blade, and they had to get deeper as they went down the blade. The thought of doing both of those keeps giving me a headache. Of course that's assuming:

1. The fullers are one continuous radius and don't have a flat bottom anywhere.

2. The blade has "normal" distal taper compared with other swords of similar length.

 

I think point 1. is very debatable if not outright incorrect, but I'm fairly confident in point 2.

 

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2 hours ago, AJ Chalifoux said:

 

I really look forward to seeing that when it's done. Reproductions of cinquedeas are basically nonexistent.

 

A cinquedea has been on my "to-make" list for a long, long time. What makes me keep putting it off was when I did a CAD model of one and realized that to do those fullers that tapered only on one side (the side touching the bevel) and still touched the other fullers on a crisp ridge with no flats in between them, they had to be at an angle relative to the centerline of the blade, and they had to get deeper as they went down the blade. The thought of doing both of those keeps giving me a headache. Of course that's assuming:

1. The fullers are one continuous radius and don't have a flat bottom anywhere.

2. The blade has "normal" distal taper compared with other swords of similar length.

 

I think point 1. is very debatable if not outright incorrect, but I'm fairly confident in point 2.

 

 

We'll see if my plan of attack works out.

 

As you can seem I'm roughing the fullers in while it is still flat stock so it's easy to mark lines and clamp down securely.

 

Then I'm going to grind the bevels in and give the whole blade a lenticular cross section. And then go over the fullers again to fill in the lines that washed out.

 

If you look at good pictures of originals the fullers do vary in diameter and often have slight flat spots where the have been filling out the lines.

 

The few cinquedeas I've been able to ogle at with bare eyes seem to have minimal distal taper. Profile taper and fullers taking care of most of it

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Rare commision for me, the clip shape will be ground little more later, its O1 sandwiched in plain iron and 8 mm thick (intend to be 7 mm after grinding).  The super long rat tail is fishtail welded plain iron.image000001.jpgimage000002.jpgimage000000.jpg

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Finally got around to trying that inlay....

..

......

.....all I can say is it was my first time.....lol!:P:lol:

first inlay.jpg

 

I need to step back and re-assess what kind of clean up and polishing I can do to save this turd, after which I will call it and move on

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Also, files and stones. Gesswein makes very good ones. Some of their stones are suitable for soft non ferrous metals, and can be used to bring back a background to a perfectly smooth surface after the inlay work, if you have the patience. Some are so soft that they will quickly take on the shape of what you are polishing, which is quite useful for curved surfaces. You can also shape the stones to reach into tight spots.

 

If you don't have the desire or the patience to go all the way to a smooth background, you can stop halfway and give deliberate and consistent texture, though that can also have its challenges.

 

This is a good first try, and you can make it even better :)

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