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What did you do in your shop today?


Joshua States

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Gary: Nice!

 

Jerrod: Thanks!  Now then, what are your thoughts on 52100 and temper embrittlement? I have done a lot with O-1, 1095, and 1075 in the "blue brittle" range for springs with only a couple of failures.  That chart makes it look as though the correct folder spring temper for the stuff is right at the top end of that.  Also, yay me for estimating the number by extrapolating the curve. B)

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For more on temper embrittlement, people should definitely check out the pinned thread on the topic.  Alan, I know you read it, you pinned it!  I just want to ensure others reading this thread know of its existence.  

 

In general, the more I see on the topic, the more I think it is becoming less of a concern.  It seems to be an issue with tramp elements (primarily Sb, Sn, P, and As), and good modern steels are clean enough to have it be a very minor issue.  Though, not all modern steels are good, so buyer beware.  

 

For springs, I'd recommend trying to form bainite, if at all possible.  Otherwise, avoid the 500-800F range for tempering martensite, being sure to cool rapidly through that range if you go hotter (e.g. quench it after tempering at 1000F).  

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@Jerrod Miller, thanks for renewing this thread Jerrod, I remember it now and had  saved it somewhere?! The charts add more depth to what Alan alluded to.

Much appreciated sir.

Now I’ll need to learn more about temper embrittlement!

Gary LT

Edited by Gary LT
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"I Never Met A Knife I Didn't Like", (Will Rogers)

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Wow, Jaro, that whole piece is fantastic! What's that handle wood?

 

Yesterday I got the blades and springs last seen on the grinder chuck ground, polished to 400, and ready for HT.  If my co-conspirator can make it I intend to HT next Saturday.

 

Today I built a rather large firepit.

 

20240324_143557.jpg

 

Doesn't look that big here, I just wanted to show Spring has sprung what with the mulberry tree in full bloom...

 

It's about 3.5 feet by 6 feet, or 1.1m x 1.9m rectangular.

 

20240324_143532.jpg

 

It's also in need of three more bricks because I miscounted somehow. :wacko:  The idea with the higher walls on the left and lower on the right is to use the left half as a general bonfire area and the right side for cooking. Next step is to make a tall tripod to hang a 28" diameter (~70cm) schwenker-type grill to be forged from heavy steel. It'll be heavy enough to support a griddle or a stewpot, with a trammel up top to adjust the height above the coals.  Not as groovy as a Chilean or Argentinian asador, but easier to make by forging and with my minimal stick-welding skills.:lol:

 

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Over the weekend I did some finish sanding on the K-tip.After surfacing to get it straight,

 

Finish Sanding (2).jpg

 

the hamon started showing around 220 grit.

 

220 Grit.jpg

 

I took it up to 1000 grit and will probably get to etching it today.

 

1000 Grit (2).jpg

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“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

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K-tip etched this morning

 

Etched (1).jpg

 

Etched (2).jpg

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“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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@Joshua States, Wow.. that’s a keeper, very very nice! I like the dark highlights under the clayed area compliment the lighter cutting area of the edge. (Make sense?) I tried fruitlessly to get such detail as I don’t want a darkened edge but rather have the contrasting action above the cutting edge area.

It was the same steel and clay process as the other recent etched blade?

Gary LT

 

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"I Never Met A Knife I Didn't Like", (Will Rogers)

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18 minutes ago, Gary LT said:

was the same steel and clay process as the other recent etched blade?

Yes. Straight 1095 from Admiral Steel. I forgot to take a photo of the clayed blade. This is the second one I made as the first one blew itself apart in the quench and I was pressed for time making another one.

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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Thanks Joshua. I used to buy 1084 in 6 foot lengths years ago at great prices from them. It wouldn’t hurt to check them out again.

Damn nice work!

Gary LT

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"I Never Met A Knife I Didn't Like", (Will Rogers)

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I got a commission knife ground and hardened over the weekend, and through its first tempering cycle this morning!

BEAR KITCHEN HARDENED.jpg

 

only to discover a very large crack running down the spine!:blink::wacko:

BEAR KITCHEN CRACK.jpg

 

I didn't see or hear the "PING" yesterday during hardening, but it doesn't mean it wasn't there....I also got impatient this morning wanting to grab it out of the temper to take with me and show the customer so I ran it under water after 10minutes in still air thinking that would be cool enough...

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5 hours ago, Jaron Martindale said:

I got a commission knife ground and hardened over the weekend, and through its first tempering cycle this morning!

only to discover a very large crack running down the spine!:blink::wacko:

 

I didn't see or hear the "PING" yesterday during hardening, but it doesn't mean it wasn't there....

Why did you wait to do the first temper? Overnight is a long time for the steel to be in its highest state of stress.   It probably happened overnight.  Some steels are more prone to this than others.

 

Most smiths I know recommend at least a 1-hour "snap" temper at least 200F immediately after quenching to avoid this.  Some folks use a pot of boiling water for this.

Edited by billyO
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RIP Bear....be free!

 

as always

peace and love

billyO

 

 

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6 minutes ago, billyO said:

Why did you wait to do the first temper?

Lots of excuses that really are no excuse, lol! Next time I'll be sure to be more diligent about giving a quick temper directly after quenching.:ph34r:

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22 hours ago, Jaron Martindale said:

I also got impatient this morning wanting to grab it out of the temper to take with me and show the customer so I ran it under water after 10minutes in still air thinking that would be cool enough...

billyO covered the main bit, but I just wanted to point out that the post temper quench definitely is not the problem.  Water quenching right out of temper is fine.  

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Did a few things over the weekend, including finding two new problems to fix!  Still working up folders, and one of the blades took a nasty warp for some reason, probably got into the seam of the foil pouch and got pressed unevenly during the quench.  It's in the oven trying to correct said warp.

 

20240401_134605.jpg

 

This amount of bend didn't help much, so it's back in the oven with a thicker spacer to push the tip down more.

 

I also learned that the 1/8" bone scales I ordered from Guitar Parts & more (great place for other stuff!) were bleached with something that made them WAY too brittle.  When I drilled the holes for the scale rivets and mainspring pin I used all the precautions: New sharp bits, masking tape, clamped hard to a piece of flat wood, very light intermittent pressure on the drill bit, and every hole blew out so completely it looked as though I shot them in with a .22 rifle.  Now, I have been using Loctite AA330 speedbonder for these scales, because it's ready to go in five minutes and it's resistant to everything.  Heat, pressure, bending, prying, most solvents, the stuff is pretty much indestructible.  And now I had to remove it or trash the liners I spend all day working on, including dovetailed bolsters.  Well, turns out that if you let it soak in lacquer thinner for 24 hours and then patiently pry with an exacto blade, it'll let go.  No pics of the aftermath, I set fire to the little can of solvent with the scales still in it (saved the liners!). Turns out that dry bone soaked in lacquer thinner will burn to bone ash.  Another learning experience!   

 

 

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I started another dirk. Howard Clark gave me this blade to mount many years ago, but I could never quite figure out what to do with it. As it was made from a broken katana blade, I knew I wanted some Japanese influences in the mounting, particularly in terms of some figurative design in the metal fittings. My initial idea was a hound and hare hunting motif, but last month the two most important dogs in my life died within a few days of each other, so that's turned into Abe and Rosie chasing each other (and possibly a rabbit) around the ferrule, and probably both of them napping on the pommel. We'll see how it goes...

hc dirk 2.jpg

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Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

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"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

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"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

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Interesting, sorry to hear the loss of your dogs. The polish turned out quite nice. I haven't seen a broken katana blade prepared this way before, but I like how it turned out. I assume you put a new heat treat on it, which is sensible. Otherwise the tip would probably be of softened metal! Traditionally on Japanese blades, the hardened part of the blade is presented pointing up. 

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